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Posted on 25-04-2017

Research for CULT Committee - Teaching Common Values in Europe

15-03-2017

Attention to the teaching of values has recently increased and is evident in the education policies of all EU Member States, also for the values of democracy and tolerance. Teaching Common Values (TCV) is fairly important in half of the EU Member States. However, TCV is often not very strongly implemented in education policy in terms of concrete curriculum instruments and in supporting measures. This results in practices that do not always give real attention to TCV.

Attention to the teaching of values has recently increased and is evident in the education policies of all EU Member States, also for the values of democracy and tolerance. Teaching Common Values (TCV) is fairly important in half of the EU Member States. However, TCV is often not very strongly implemented in education policy in terms of concrete curriculum instruments and in supporting measures. This results in practices that do not always give real attention to TCV.

External author

University of Humanistic Studies Utrecht: Wiel Veugelers, Isolde de Groot, Vincent Stolk ; Authors case studies: Antoine Bevort, Gert Biesta, Maria Rosa Buxarrais, Emilian Colceru, Isolde de Groot & Wiel Veugelers, Inken Heldt & Dirk Lange, Pavla Karba, Anastasia Kesidou, Barbara Malak-Minkiewicz & Jerzy Wiśniewski, Dana Moree, Heidi Paju, Kirsi Tirri

Minimum income policies in EU Member states

14-04-2017

This document was prepared by Policy Department A for the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs to feed into its own-initiative report on “Minimum income policies as a tool to tackle poverty”. It is an update of the previous two studies published in 2007 and in 2011. It provides updated facts and figures on minimum schemes across EU Member States since 2010, an overview of the evolution of poverty and social exclusion and a summary of recent debates across Europe.

This document was prepared by Policy Department A for the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs to feed into its own-initiative report on “Minimum income policies as a tool to tackle poverty”. It is an update of the previous two studies published in 2007 and in 2011. It provides updated facts and figures on minimum schemes across EU Member States since 2010, an overview of the evolution of poverty and social exclusion and a summary of recent debates across Europe.

External author

Chiara CREPALDI, Barbara DA ROIT, Claudio CASTEGNARO, Sergio PASQUINELLI

Research for REGI Committee - Building Blocks for a Future Cohesion Policy – First Reflections

14-04-2017

The reform of the EU budget and policy priorities in the post-2020 MFF comes at a difficult time for the EU with major internal and external challenges. The challenges for economic, social and territorial cohesion remain profound. However, there are also competing pressures on the EU budget, such as keeping net payers’ contributions within acceptable limits and striking the right balance between overarching EU goals and new challenges. Once again, Cohesion Policy is under pressure to justify its ...

The reform of the EU budget and policy priorities in the post-2020 MFF comes at a difficult time for the EU with major internal and external challenges. The challenges for economic, social and territorial cohesion remain profound. However, there are also competing pressures on the EU budget, such as keeping net payers’ contributions within acceptable limits and striking the right balance between overarching EU goals and new challenges. Once again, Cohesion Policy is under pressure to justify its value in relation to EU political objectives. This study discusses the main themes relating to post-2020 Cohesion Policy, the rationale and overall framework of the policy, current and future challenges, and the post-2020 delivery system.

External author

European Policies Research Centre, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow: John BACHTLER, Laura POLVERARI

Posted on 24-04-2017

The future of EU - ASEAN relations

20-04-2017

Marking the 40th anniversary of the start of their dialogue ASEAN and the EU have agreed to work towards establishing a strategic partnership. While trade has always been the cornerstone of the relationship - ASEAN is the EU’s third largest trade partner - the EU’s ambition to expand its role as a global actor demand increased engagement. Both sides face common challenges that can only be addressed through joint responses that involve all stakeholders. To be strategic the partnership must embrace ...

Marking the 40th anniversary of the start of their dialogue ASEAN and the EU have agreed to work towards establishing a strategic partnership. While trade has always been the cornerstone of the relationship - ASEAN is the EU’s third largest trade partner - the EU’s ambition to expand its role as a global actor demand increased engagement. Both sides face common challenges that can only be addressed through joint responses that involve all stakeholders. To be strategic the partnership must embrace all aspects, from trade to energy, from climate change to security issues, from human rights to sustainable development. Deepening and enhancing relations between one of the most dynamic region in the world and the largest and most affluent market will bring important benefits to both European and ASEAN citizens. The last years have seen an increase in contacts but the many challenges faced today by the EU, internally and in its close neighbourhood, risk to require all attention and put the EU-ASEAN relations at risk. Finally the study argues that strengthening the parliamentary dimension of the relationship would, besides supporting representative democracy in Southeast Asia, contribute to maintaining the momentum launched in 2012.

Rules on independence and responsibility regarding auditing, tax advice, accountancy, account certification services and legal services

14-04-2017

This study maps the rules on independence and responsibility that are applicable at national, EU, and international level that govern the service provision by intermediaries such as companies working in auditing, tax advice, accountancy and account certification or by legal advisors (attorneys, solicitors, legal consultants, in-house lawyers, etc.). The mapping forms the basis for policy recommendations to encourage intermediaries to deliver a positive contribution to combatting tax evasion, tax ...

This study maps the rules on independence and responsibility that are applicable at national, EU, and international level that govern the service provision by intermediaries such as companies working in auditing, tax advice, accountancy and account certification or by legal advisors (attorneys, solicitors, legal consultants, in-house lawyers, etc.). The mapping forms the basis for policy recommendations to encourage intermediaries to deliver a positive contribution to combatting tax evasion, tax avoidance and money laundering. This document was prepared for Policy Department A at the request of the Committee of Inquiry into Money Laundering, Tax Avoidance and Tax Evasion (PANA).

External author

Ian ROXAN (LSE), Saipriya KAMATH (LSE), Willem Pieter DE GROEN (CEPS) ; Research support: Katharina EHRHART (LSE Enterprise)

Role of advisors and intermediaries in the schemes revealed in the Panama Papers

14-04-2017

The use of offshore entities that facilitate money laundering, tax avoidance and tax evasion undermines the fair distribution of the tax burden in onshore jurisdictions. The Panama Papers shed some light on the activities that are usually conducted in secrecy, with the disclosure of information on 213,634 offshore entities in jurisdictions such as the British Virgin Islands, Panama and the Seychelles. This analysis assesses the role of advisors (tax experts, legal experts, administrators, investment ...

The use of offshore entities that facilitate money laundering, tax avoidance and tax evasion undermines the fair distribution of the tax burden in onshore jurisdictions. The Panama Papers shed some light on the activities that are usually conducted in secrecy, with the disclosure of information on 213,634 offshore entities in jurisdictions such as the British Virgin Islands, Panama and the Seychelles. This analysis assesses the role of advisors (tax experts, legal experts, administrators, investment advisors) and intermediaries (law firms, accounting firms, trust companies, banks, etc.) involved in the phases of the identified decision-making cycle (advice, creation, maintenance, enforcement). This document was prepared for Policy Department A at the request of the Committee of Inquiry into Money Laundering, Tax Avoidance and Tax Evasion (PANA).

External author

Willem Pieter DE GROEN (CEPS)

Posted on 20-04-2017

Tax evasion, money laundering and tax transparency in the EU Overseas Countries and Territories: Ex-Post Impact Assessment

20-04-2017

This study aims to present the legal, political and institutional framework governing offshore practices in the Overseas Countries and Territories (OCTs) of the European Union, which are under the sovereignty of four Member States: Denmark, France, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. The institutional arrangements of the OCTs with the relevant EU Member States directly affect the possibility to establish policies and adopt regulations, including on taxation and money laundering. Regardless of ...

This study aims to present the legal, political and institutional framework governing offshore practices in the Overseas Countries and Territories (OCTs) of the European Union, which are under the sovereignty of four Member States: Denmark, France, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. The institutional arrangements of the OCTs with the relevant EU Member States directly affect the possibility to establish policies and adopt regulations, including on taxation and money laundering. Regardless of the level of control of the EU Member States over their OCTs, implementation of the law by the local authorities is of concern in a number of the UK and Dutch OCTs, both in terms of structural weaknesses, but also because of limited financial and human resources. In the case of the French OCTs, suboptimal oversight controls and lack of information make it difficult to supervise financial activities. The opening analysis compares the French, Dutch and British cases in terms of combating tax evasion, money laundering and enhancing tax transparency; explores the case of Greenland; and draws conclusions on how the EU could better use its leverage in these overseas territories. The analysis is based on the detailed annexed contributions, written by external experts, which cover in detail the OCTs under French, Dutch, and British rule. This ex-post impact assessment has been produced by the European Parliamentary Research Service at the request of the European Parliament's Committee of Inquiry into Money Laundering, Tax Avoidance and Tax Evasion (PANA) to assist it in the context of its ongoing work.

External author

Prof. Alexandre Maitrot de la Motte of the University of Paris-Est Creteil, Prof. Dr H.E. Bröring, Prof. Dr O.O. Cherednychenko, Prof. Dr H.G. Hoogers and G. Karapetian LL.M. (Department of Constitutional Law, Administrative Law and Public Administration/Groningen Centre for European Financial Services Law (GCEFSL), University of Groningen), Dr Peter Clegg of the University of the West of England

Shrinking space for civil society: the EU response

12-04-2017

The EU has developed an impressive range of policy tools for pushing back against restrictions on civil society across the world. It has gradually improved the way it deploys these instruments and has helped protect many activists at risk. Notwithstanding this, the EU needs to sharpen its ‘shrinking space’ strategy. This study suggests a range of precise policy changes it should contemplate to this end. It advocates a number of strategic guidelines that could help make the EU’s responses more proactive ...

The EU has developed an impressive range of policy tools for pushing back against restrictions on civil society across the world. It has gradually improved the way it deploys these instruments and has helped protect many activists at risk. Notwithstanding this, the EU needs to sharpen its ‘shrinking space’ strategy. This study suggests a range of precise policy changes it should contemplate to this end. It advocates a number of strategic guidelines that could help make the EU’s responses more proactive; better able to tackle the broad structural elements of the shrinking space; fully balanced between political and development approaches; and geared towards building more inclusive alliances against new restrictions on civil society.

External author

Richard YOUNGS (Senior Fellow at Carnegie Europe, Belgium and Professor at the University of Warwick, United Kingdom) and Ana ECHAGÜE (independent consultant)

Research for PECH Committee - Small scale fisheries and “Blue Growth” in the EU

18-04-2017

This study presents an overview of Blue Growth emerging industries and investigates the linkages with the traditional maritime activity of fisheries with emphasis on small-scale fisheries. Positive synergies are investigated as well as possible opportunities (and threats) that Blue Growth can or should offer to small-scale fisheries and coastal communities in the context of economic growth, employment and innovation.

This study presents an overview of Blue Growth emerging industries and investigates the linkages with the traditional maritime activity of fisheries with emphasis on small-scale fisheries. Positive synergies are investigated as well as possible opportunities (and threats) that Blue Growth can or should offer to small-scale fisheries and coastal communities in the context of economic growth, employment and innovation.

External author

Kim Stobberup, María Dolores Garza Gil, Aude Stirnemann-Relot, Arthur Rigaud, Nicolò Franceschelli, Roland Blomeyer (Blomeyer & Sanz)

Posted on 12-04-2017

Possible impacts of Brexit on EU development and humanitarian policies

05-04-2017

Brexit could have a major impact on EU development and humanitarian policies. However, although Brexit is highly likely to happen, there are still uncertainties about the UK’s new foreign policy approach and its repercussions on aid. The UK may act under three different scenarios (nationalist, realist, cosmopolitan) with different consequences for EU aid. The UK’s leaving would challenge the EU’s role as the world’s leading donor: EU aid may decrease by up to 3 % and it could lose between 10 % and ...

Brexit could have a major impact on EU development and humanitarian policies. However, although Brexit is highly likely to happen, there are still uncertainties about the UK’s new foreign policy approach and its repercussions on aid. The UK may act under three different scenarios (nationalist, realist, cosmopolitan) with different consequences for EU aid. The UK’s leaving would challenge the EU’s role as the world’s leading donor: EU aid may decrease by up to 3 % and it could lose between 10 % and 13 % of its world aid share. Its presence, through ODA, in neighbouring countries throughout Eastern Europe and North Africa could be particularly affected, with a cut of between 1 % and 4 %, depending on different scenarios. The EU could react to Brexit by adopting two distinct approaches to foreign policy and development cooperation: either limiting its role to that of a regional power or growing to become a global leader. In the first approach, Brexit would have a very mild effect and would lead to very few policy challenges. However, in the second, the EU would need to compensate for the loss of Britain’s contribution to EU aid, both in quantitative and qualitative terms.

External author

Iliana OLIVIÉ, senior analyst, and Aitor PÉREZ, senior research fellow, Elcano Royal Institute, Spain

Upcoming events

03-05-2017
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03-05-2017
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Business and human rights in EU External Policies
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