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Posted on 22-02-2017

Impacts of the CETA Agreement on Developing Countries

16-02-2017

With the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) negotiations concluded and subsequently signed by both parties, the European Union and Canada’s most progressive trade agreement to date is set to provisionally enter into force soon. However, as developed countries move to negotiate preferential trade agreements between themselves (like the CETA), extending beyond current multilateral trade obligations, the improved market access, trade harmonisation and cross-cutting issues included in ...

With the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) negotiations concluded and subsequently signed by both parties, the European Union and Canada’s most progressive trade agreement to date is set to provisionally enter into force soon. However, as developed countries move to negotiate preferential trade agreements between themselves (like the CETA), extending beyond current multilateral trade obligations, the improved market access, trade harmonisation and cross-cutting issues included in the agreements can have a much wider impact, affecting countries not party to them. As far as CETA is concerned, in our judgement those impacts are likely to be relatively small, and confined to a small group of vulnerable states, especially those with concentrated export structures, and notably of primary products in direct competition with Canadian exports to the EU. However, given the limitations of this paper the conclusion is fairly speculative, and so a key recommendation is that more detailed analysis of potentially vulnerable exporters be conducted to narrow down a subsequent mitigation strategy. That mitigation strategy mainly revolves around the impact of non-tariff measures (NTMs), focusing on product standards, and Rules of Origin. Essentially the focus needs to be on a targeted development assistance package referencing the need to upgrade product standards capacities in vulnerable states, in order to maximise the potential of trade to contribute to economic growth and, thereby, poverty reduction.

External author

Peter Draper

European Energy Industry Investments

16-01-2017

This study was prepared at the request of the European Parliament's Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE). The paper provides an overall assessment of European investments in the electricity sector. It concludes by providing policy recommendations to facilitate the investments in the electricity sector which are needed to enable a transition to a low carbon energy supply, while realising a fully integrated and interconnected electricity system, enhancing competitiveness and ensuring security ...

This study was prepared at the request of the European Parliament's Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE). The paper provides an overall assessment of European investments in the electricity sector. It concludes by providing policy recommendations to facilitate the investments in the electricity sector which are needed to enable a transition to a low carbon energy supply, while realising a fully integrated and interconnected electricity system, enhancing competitiveness and ensuring security of electricity supply.

External author

Luc VAN NUFFEL, Koen RADEMAEKERS, Jessica YEARWOOD and Verena GRAICHEN

Posted on 21-02-2017

Research for AGRI Committee - The EU Cattle Sector: Challenges and Opportunities - Milk and Meat

15-02-2017

The cattle sector is of great economic importance within the EU agricultural sector. Productivity of the sector is very heterogeneous. In the near future, a further increase in milk and bovine meat supply can be expected. To avoid a decline in farm gate prices, further product differentiation at the EU level, an increase in export opportunities as well as compensation for environmental services to support extensification will be needed.

The cattle sector is of great economic importance within the EU agricultural sector. Productivity of the sector is very heterogeneous. In the near future, a further increase in milk and bovine meat supply can be expected. To avoid a decline in farm gate prices, further product differentiation at the EU level, an increase in export opportunities as well as compensation for environmental services to support extensification will be needed.

External author

Rico Ihle, Liesbeth Dries, Roel Jongeneel, Thomas Venus and Justus Wesseler (Wageningen University, The Netherlands)

Posted on 20-02-2017

Afghanistan: Challenges and Perspectives until 2020

02-02-2017

Workshop on "Afghanistan - Challenges and Perspectives until 2020" held in Brussels on 17 November 2016.

Workshop on "Afghanistan - Challenges and Perspectives until 2020" held in Brussels on 17 November 2016.

External author

Giulia BONACQUISTI (Trans European Policy Studies Association - TEPSA, Belgium) and Victor TANZARELLA HARTMANN (Trans European Policy Studies Association - TEPSA, Belgium) (for the workshop report) ; Mona KANWAL SHEIKH (Danish Institute for International Studies, Denmark - for the briefing 1) ; Arne STRAND (U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre, Chr. Michelsen Institute, Norway - briefing 2) ; Richard GHIASY (Stockholm International Peace Research Institute - SIPRI, Sweden)

A European Statute for Social and Solidarity-Based Enterprise

15-02-2017

The study was requested by the European Parliament’s Committee on Legal Affairs and commissioned, overseen and published by the Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs. Social enterprises (SE) are subject to ad hoc legislation in an increasing number of EU jurisdictions and legislative initiatives in this field are under consideration by EU institutions. This paper explains why tailor-made legislation on SE is essential for the development of this unconventional form of ...

The study was requested by the European Parliament’s Committee on Legal Affairs and commissioned, overseen and published by the Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs. Social enterprises (SE) are subject to ad hoc legislation in an increasing number of EU jurisdictions and legislative initiatives in this field are under consideration by EU institutions. This paper explains why tailor-made legislation on SE is essential for the development of this unconventional form of business organization. It describes and compares existing models of SE regulation and discusses the core elements of an SE’s legal identity, with the aim of providing recommendations on the potential forms and contents of an EU legal statute on this subject.

External author

Antonio FICI (University of Molise, Italy)

Posted on 16-02-2017

Provisions governing the activity of high political office-holders in election or selection processes: A comparative analysis of the provisions and practices in the EU, its Member States and selected international organisations

16-02-2017

In its resolution of 28 April 2016 on the discharge procedure for the year 2014, the European Parliament instructed the European Parliamentary Research Service to undertake a study including 'a comparative analysis of the legal framework governing the compatibilities of candidates who run for election campaigns in other international organisations and in the Member States (election of prime minister, secretary general, chancellor, etc.)'. This study therefore examines relevant rules on the use of ...

In its resolution of 28 April 2016 on the discharge procedure for the year 2014, the European Parliament instructed the European Parliamentary Research Service to undertake a study including 'a comparative analysis of the legal framework governing the compatibilities of candidates who run for election campaigns in other international organisations and in the Member States (election of prime minister, secretary general, chancellor, etc.)'. This study therefore examines relevant rules on the use of public resources by high political office-holders in electoral/selection processes at EU, international and EU Member State level. An initial version of this study was delivered to the Members of the Committee on Budgetary Control in October 2016. This revised version incorporates some minor changes following final verifications. Nonetheless, the information in this study does not reflect any further possible recent changes in any individual Member State.

Free Trade Agreements and Patterns of Risk Regulation in the EU and the US

13-09-2016

Transatlantic regulatory patterns overall and in four key sectors: food, automobiles, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals indicate that the EU risk regulation is not always or generally more stringent or precautionary than the US regulation. In fact, the reality is a complex mix of parity and particularity. While there is overall EU-US similarity, there is also variation. In some risk matters, and across and within sectors, there is more precaution in Europe, whereas in others it may be in the US. Even ...

Transatlantic regulatory patterns overall and in four key sectors: food, automobiles, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals indicate that the EU risk regulation is not always or generally more stringent or precautionary than the US regulation. In fact, the reality is a complex mix of parity and particularity. While there is overall EU-US similarity, there is also variation. In some risk matters, and across and within sectors, there is more precaution in Europe, whereas in others it may be in the US. Even if they are unusual deviations, and even if they go in both directions, transatlantic regulatory differences can still pose barriers to trade that may in some cases warrant harmonization. However, regulatory variation can also be the basis for learning to improve future regulatory design, both by comparing outcomes across regulations in different jurisdictions, and by planning adaptive regulation over time. International regulatory cooperation does not simply mean adopting the current standard of one side or the other. It can also involve collaboration to reviewing existing regulations and designing new approaches that improve outcomes for all.

External author

International Risk Governance Council (Switzerland)

The Budgetary Tools for Financing the EU External Policy

16-01-2017

The paper provides an overview of the current set-up of tools contributing to the funding of the EU external policies. The focus is on the recently established instruments and how they relate to the previously existing ones. The paper provides a first assessment of the current and envisaged set up of tools with regards to the following key aspects: added-value, coherence, flexibility and simplification, and democratic oversight of EU funding for external action.

The paper provides an overview of the current set-up of tools contributing to the funding of the EU external policies. The focus is on the recently established instruments and how they relate to the previously existing ones. The paper provides a first assessment of the current and envisaged set up of tools with regards to the following key aspects: added-value, coherence, flexibility and simplification, and democratic oversight of EU funding for external action.

External author

Roland Blomeyer, Sebastian Paulo and Elsa Perreau (Blomeyer & Sanz)

Research for CULT Committee - Migrant Education: Monitoring and Assessment

15-02-2017

This is a first attempt to explore the monitoring and assessment of migrant education (MAME) in EU countries. A review of literature indicated the main dimensions of MAME, and these have shaped a questionnaire completed by national experts of 27 EU countries. The country reports reveal that little has been done to monitor and assess migrant education, but that most countries already have an enabling infrastructure.

This is a first attempt to explore the monitoring and assessment of migrant education (MAME) in EU countries. A review of literature indicated the main dimensions of MAME, and these have shaped a questionnaire completed by national experts of 27 EU countries. The country reports reveal that little has been done to monitor and assess migrant education, but that most countries already have an enabling infrastructure.

External author

Miguel Àngel Essomba, Anna Tarrés and Núria Franco-Guillén

Posted on 13-02-2017

Implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights

06-01-2017

This study reviews the progress of implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGPs) in non-EU countries, five years after their unanimous adoption by the United Nations Human Rights Council in 2011. Much progress has already been achieved, with i.a. relevant key international standards like OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises becoming aligned with the UNGPs, new tools being developed to provide guidance to governments and stakeholders and a basis being set ...

This study reviews the progress of implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGPs) in non-EU countries, five years after their unanimous adoption by the United Nations Human Rights Council in 2011. Much progress has already been achieved, with i.a. relevant key international standards like OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises becoming aligned with the UNGPs, new tools being developed to provide guidance to governments and stakeholders and a basis being set for constructive discussion. This led to increased awareness and better understanding, building trust and engagement among various stakeholders. Yet, despite all efforts, business-related human rights abuse is still a serious problem. Further implementation of the UNGPs and related instruments is thus necessary, with special emphasis needed on access to remedy and justice for victims of business-related abuses. Less declaration and more real political will is needed, as states’ commitments to develop National Action Plans implementing the Guiding Principles have been far too slow to materialise, with only twelve NAPs being launched to date. Yet, the number of ongoing processes is promising, particularly in South America, although we have yet to see how meaningful and future action oriented their outcomes will be.

External author

Beata FARACIK, Human Rights Expert, President of the Board, Polish Institute for Human Rights and Business, Poland

Upcoming events

27-02-2017
The state and development of the biomass of fish stocks managed by the CFP
Hearing -
PECH
28-02-2017
The Third Reform of the Common European Asylum System - Up for the Challenge
Other event -
LIBE
28-02-2017
Workshop on the consequences of Brexit
Workshop -
IMCO

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