15

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2021-2027 multiannual financial framework and new own resources: Analysis of the Commission's proposal

26-07-2018

The process of negotiating a new seven-year financial plan for the EU has now begun formally with the Commission's publication of proposals for a 2021-2027 Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF), and for a new system of own resources providing the revenue to pay for it. This analysis presents the proposed new MFF and own resources and compares them to the status quo, as well as to the European Parliament's priorities as expressed in plenary resolutions adopted in spring 2018.

The process of negotiating a new seven-year financial plan for the EU has now begun formally with the Commission's publication of proposals for a 2021-2027 Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF), and for a new system of own resources providing the revenue to pay for it. This analysis presents the proposed new MFF and own resources and compares them to the status quo, as well as to the European Parliament's priorities as expressed in plenary resolutions adopted in spring 2018.

Post-2020 MFF and own resources: Ahead of the Commission's proposal

27-04-2018

On 2 May, the Commission is expected to publish proposals for a new multiannual financial framework (MFF) for the European Union for the years after 2020, as well as for a new system of own resources (OR) to provide the EU with the means to finance its annual budgets. The following day the proposals are to be presented to the Parliament's Committee on Budgets (BUDG).The proposals are being published as a package, and will be followed by a series of further legislative proposals for individual spending ...

On 2 May, the Commission is expected to publish proposals for a new multiannual financial framework (MFF) for the European Union for the years after 2020, as well as for a new system of own resources (OR) to provide the EU with the means to finance its annual budgets. The following day the proposals are to be presented to the Parliament's Committee on Budgets (BUDG).The proposals are being published as a package, and will be followed by a series of further legislative proposals for individual spending programmes to appear later in May and in June. The next MFF and OR system will set the EU's priorities and determine much of its scope for action for a period of at least five years. The proposals are an opportunity for the Commission to respond to a set of longstanding issues concerning how the EU finances its priorities, and to new issues arising from a political landscape that has changed profoundly since 2013, when the EU last negotiated its multiannual budget plan. Chief among these are the twin pressures affecting both the revenue and spending sides of the budget: the loss of a major net contributor country in the departure from the EU of the United Kingdom; and growing pressure to respond to new challenges mainly linked to the refugee and migration crisis that erupted after the current MFF was put in place, as well as ongoing issues resulting from the financial and sovereign debt crises. The Commission's proposals for a new MFF and OR will also respond to the question of how big the EU budget should be. Currently subject to a political cap of 1 % of the EU's GNI, the EU budget is modest in comparison with the government budgets of the EU's Member States. Nevertheless, negotiations over whether to increase this cap will be politically fraught in a context where some Member States are under pressure to reduce national budget deficits. Other issues at stake in the negotiations are the flexibility, conditionalities, structure and duration of the next MFF, and the sensitive question of whether to increase the EU's financial autonomy by endowing it with new and significant own resources.

The Future of Europe: Contours of the current debate

12-04-2018

In the aftermath of the United Kingdom’s decision to leave the European Union (EU), following the referendum of June 2016, the EU launched a profound reflection on the Future of Europe, which continues in various fora and institutions. The debate has gained new momentum: the acceleration of the negotiations with the UK on its withdrawal from the EU, the electoral results in some EU Member States, and the forthcoming European Parliament elections in May 2019, have all deepened the discussion and increased ...

In the aftermath of the United Kingdom’s decision to leave the European Union (EU), following the referendum of June 2016, the EU launched a profound reflection on the Future of Europe, which continues in various fora and institutions. The debate has gained new momentum: the acceleration of the negotiations with the UK on its withdrawal from the EU, the electoral results in some EU Member States, and the forthcoming European Parliament elections in May 2019, have all deepened the discussion and increased the visibility of the positions of the various actors involved. In this context, since the beginning of 2018, the European Parliament has been organising plenary debates on the 'Future of Europe' with Heads of State or Government – so far with the Irish Prime Minister, Leo Varadkar, in January; the Croatian Prime Minister, Andrej Plenković, in February; and the Prime Minister of Portugal, António Costa, in March. The President of France, Emmanuel Macron, is due to deliver a speech during the Parliament's April 2018 plenary session. The Belgian Prime Minister, Charles Michel, and the Prime Minister of Luxembourg, Xavier Bettel, have confirmed their participation in early May, in Brussels, and at the end of May, in Strasbourg, respectively. This Briefing gives an overview of where the current debate stands in a number of key policy areas, such as the future of economic and monetary union (EMU) and the EU's social dimension, as well as recent developments in EU migration policy, and security and defence. It also includes some preliminary analysis about the future, post-2020, Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) and discussions on broader institutional matters. See also the parallel EPRS publication, From Rome to Sibiu – The European Council and the Future of Europe debate, PE 615.667.

Performance budgeting: A means to improve EU spending

16-03-2018

In 2015, the European Commission launched an initiative entitled 'The EU budget focused on results'. It is aimed at changing spending culture and making results a horizontal priority for the EU budget. The initiative is based on a popular contemporary budgeting method known as 'performance budgeting'. This paper presents the method and its application to the EU budget. It explains why, although not easy to implement, performance budgeting is seen as an attractive way to increase value for money and ...

In 2015, the European Commission launched an initiative entitled 'The EU budget focused on results'. It is aimed at changing spending culture and making results a horizontal priority for the EU budget. The initiative is based on a popular contemporary budgeting method known as 'performance budgeting'. This paper presents the method and its application to the EU budget. It explains why, although not easy to implement, performance budgeting is seen as an attractive way to increase value for money and enhance the transparency and democratic accountability of public finances. The paper also analyses how the performance budgeting approach has evolved within the EU budgetary system and what challenges and obstacles to its implementation remain. The commitment of the European Commission to the principles of performance budgeting, as well as the broad support for the idea expressed by the European Parliament and the Council, give grounds to believe that these efforts will continue in the post-2020 Multiannual Financial Framework.

Post-2020 Multiannual Financial Framework

06-03-2018

In May 2018, the European Commission is expected to adopt a proposal on a new Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) for the period after 2020, alongside proposals on the reform of the 'own resources' system. Parliament's Committee on Budgets (BUDG) has adopted an own-initiative report on its position on the future MFF, together with one on reform of 'own resources'. Due to be debated during the March plenary session, the two texts will set out Parliament’s perspective on both the revenue and expenditure ...

In May 2018, the European Commission is expected to adopt a proposal on a new Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) for the period after 2020, alongside proposals on the reform of the 'own resources' system. Parliament's Committee on Budgets (BUDG) has adopted an own-initiative report on its position on the future MFF, together with one on reform of 'own resources'. Due to be debated during the March plenary session, the two texts will set out Parliament’s perspective on both the revenue and expenditure sides of the EU budget, which it argues should be treated as a single package in the upcoming negotiations.

European Maritime and Fisheries Fund

15-06-2017

The €6 396.6 million European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) is the smallest of the European Structural and Investment Funds for the 2014-2020 period, but it is the major financial tool supporting the EU common fisheries policy (CFP). Slightly less than half of the Fund is dedicated to promoting sustainable fisheries and to fostering sustainable aquaculture. Another significant share contributes to proper implementation of the CFP, particularly for data collection and science-based needs, and ...

The €6 396.6 million European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) is the smallest of the European Structural and Investment Funds for the 2014-2020 period, but it is the major financial tool supporting the EU common fisheries policy (CFP). Slightly less than half of the Fund is dedicated to promoting sustainable fisheries and to fostering sustainable aquaculture. Another significant share contributes to proper implementation of the CFP, particularly for data collection and science-based needs, and control and enforcement of rules. A small part of the EMFF is also aimed at supporting an integrated maritime policy (IMP) for the EU.

Economic and budgetary outlook for the European Union 2017

27-01-2017

This study presents the economic and budgetary outlook for the European Union (EU) in 2017 and beyond. Economic estimates point to moderate growth and creation of new employment against a backdrop of persistent external and internal challenges that may hinder recovery. An investment gap persist in almost all EU Member States and a number of EU measures contribute to addressing it. While fiscal policies remain mainly within EU Member States' remit, they are increasingly coordinated at EU level through ...

This study presents the economic and budgetary outlook for the European Union (EU) in 2017 and beyond. Economic estimates point to moderate growth and creation of new employment against a backdrop of persistent external and internal challenges that may hinder recovery. An investment gap persist in almost all EU Member States and a number of EU measures contribute to addressing it. While fiscal policies remain mainly within EU Member States' remit, they are increasingly coordinated at EU level through rules and processes such as the European Semester. However, a central tool of fiscal stabilisation is missing, as the EU budget was not designed to play this role. This is due to the size of the EU budget (only some 1 % of the area's gross national income) and its limited flexibility in the context of multiannual financial planning. While the structure of the 2017 EU budget is largely determined by the 2014-2020 Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF), EU institutions have used the flexibility provisions of the MFF to strengthen resources in areas considered of key concern – the economic and migration crises, and emerging security issues. The need to resort to such provisions appears to be a constant feature of the current MFF. The debate on the future of the EU budget is expected to gain momentum in 2017 in the run-up to the European Commission proposal for a post-2020 MFF. In a rapidly evolving world, the design of the EU budget has to ensure the right balance between predictability of investments and capacity to respond to new challenges and priorities.

European Regional Development Fund

07-10-2016

The European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) is one of the European Structural and Investment (ESI) Funds. It has the largest budget – 43.2 % of the total allocation for the ESI Funds – and wide-ranging investment priorities. Its action focuses on the development and structural adjustment of regions whose development is lagging behind. About 95 % of ERDF resources is spent on investment for growth and jobs. The remaining 5 % supports European territorial cooperation programmes (formerly known as ...

The European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) is one of the European Structural and Investment (ESI) Funds. It has the largest budget – 43.2 % of the total allocation for the ESI Funds – and wide-ranging investment priorities. Its action focuses on the development and structural adjustment of regions whose development is lagging behind. About 95 % of ERDF resources is spent on investment for growth and jobs. The remaining 5 % supports European territorial cooperation programmes (formerly known as Interreg).

How the EU budget is spent: Cohesion Fund

14-09-2016

The Cohesion Fund is one of the European Structural and Investment Funds. Created in 1993, it supports large-scale investments in environmental sustainability, including through an increase in renewable energy use and energy efficiency, and in transport infrastructure, especially the trans-European transport networks. The Cohesion Fund is addressed exclusively to Member States with per capita gross national income of less than 90% of the EU average and have put in place a programme leading to the ...

The Cohesion Fund is one of the European Structural and Investment Funds. Created in 1993, it supports large-scale investments in environmental sustainability, including through an increase in renewable energy use and energy efficiency, and in transport infrastructure, especially the trans-European transport networks. The Cohesion Fund is addressed exclusively to Member States with per capita gross national income of less than 90% of the EU average and have put in place a programme leading to the achievement of economic convergence. The Cohesion Fund's fourth edition is currently being implemented in 15 EU Member States: Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Greece, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia.

Mid-term review/revision of the 2014-2020 Multiannual Financial Framework

01-07-2016

The EU's Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) for 2014-2020 lays down maximum annual levels of EU spending in different areas. Before the end of 2016, the European Commission should present the mid-term review and, as appropriate, a revision of the MFF. During the July plenary session, the European Parliament is scheduled to discuss and vote on the own-initiative report as its input to the process ahead of the Commission’s presentation of the review. The list of issues at stake includes both current ...

The EU's Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) for 2014-2020 lays down maximum annual levels of EU spending in different areas. Before the end of 2016, the European Commission should present the mid-term review and, as appropriate, a revision of the MFF. During the July plenary session, the European Parliament is scheduled to discuss and vote on the own-initiative report as its input to the process ahead of the Commission’s presentation of the review. The list of issues at stake includes both current problems requiring immediate action, and long-standing, contentious aspects of the functioning of the MFF beyond 2020.

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