36

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Policy area
Keyword
Date

Geo-Blocking

06-02-2018

This leaflet provides abstracts of selection of latest publications prepared by the European Parliament’s Policy Department on Economic and Scientific Policy at the request of the IMCO Committee in relation to the geo-blocking phenomenon.

This leaflet provides abstracts of selection of latest publications prepared by the European Parliament’s Policy Department on Economic and Scientific Policy at the request of the IMCO Committee in relation to the geo-blocking phenomenon.

Affordable communications for businesses and consumers

01-02-2018

The concept of ICTs covers a broad spectrum of technologies, ranging from information technology (IT) through telecommunications, broadcast media, and all types of audio and video processing and transmission to network-based control and monitoring functions. Information and communication technologies (ICTs) and data and internet access services have taken the place of traditional telephone services as the key products for both consumers and businesses. Although linear broadcasting continues to be ...

The concept of ICTs covers a broad spectrum of technologies, ranging from information technology (IT) through telecommunications, broadcast media, and all types of audio and video processing and transmission to network-based control and monitoring functions. Information and communication technologies (ICTs) and data and internet access services have taken the place of traditional telephone services as the key products for both consumers and businesses. Although linear broadcasting continues to be the principal medium of information distribution and entertainment in Europe, more and more audiovisual content is available on demand and 4G and 5G internet connectivity is subject to exponential growth. As a consequence, the EU has set up a regulatory framework for telecommunications covering fixed and wireless telecoms, internet, broadcasting and transmission services, through a series of rules which apply throughout the EU Member States.

Digital Agenda for Europe

01-02-2018

Since 1995, information and communication technologies (ICTs) have driven productivity gains and growth in the EU[1]. The concept of ICTs covers a broad spectrum of technologies, ranging from information technology (IT) through telecommunications, broadcast media, and all types of audio and video processing and transmission to network-based control and monitoring functions. Over the past three decades, technological ‘convergence’ has been blurring the boundaries between telecommunications, broadcasting ...

Since 1995, information and communication technologies (ICTs) have driven productivity gains and growth in the EU[1]. The concept of ICTs covers a broad spectrum of technologies, ranging from information technology (IT) through telecommunications, broadcast media, and all types of audio and video processing and transmission to network-based control and monitoring functions. Over the past three decades, technological ‘convergence’ has been blurring the boundaries between telecommunications, broadcasting and IT. Although linear broadcasting continues to be the principal medium of information distribution and entertainment in Europe, more and more audiovisual content is available on demand, while exponential growth in 4G and 5G internet connectivity and the ‘internet of things’ (IoT) gives the internet an increasingly ubiquitous dimension. With a view to addressing the different challenges, the Commission launched the digital single market in 2015 to deliver the main legislative proposals set as priority, such as boosting e-commerce, copyright, audiovisuals, the telecoms review, ePrivacy, harmonisation of digital rights, affordable parcel delivery, harmonised VAT rules and cybersecurity.

The internal market: general principles

01-11-2017

The internal market is an area of prosperity and freedom, giving 500 million Europeans access to goods, services, jobs, business opportunities and the cultural richness of 28 Member States. A study by Parliament’s Committee on Internal Market and Consumer Protection (IMCO) entitled ‘Contribution of the Internal Market and Consumer Protection to Growth’ points to the significant potential of policies promoting free movement of goods, services, people and capital to boost the GDP (gross domestic product ...

The internal market is an area of prosperity and freedom, giving 500 million Europeans access to goods, services, jobs, business opportunities and the cultural richness of 28 Member States. A study by Parliament’s Committee on Internal Market and Consumer Protection (IMCO) entitled ‘Contribution of the Internal Market and Consumer Protection to Growth’ points to the significant potential of policies promoting free movement of goods, services, people and capital to boost the GDP (gross domestic product) of the EU 28 . While the construction of an internal market requires continuous efforts, the further deepening of the single market could yield significant gains for EU consumers and businesses, increasing the GDP of the EU 28 by EUR 235 billion per year, if the remaining barriers were eliminated. The debate on the internal market was relaunched by the European institutions with a communication on the Europe 2020 strategy, a report by the Commission entitled ‘A new strategy for the single market — At the service of Europe’s economy and society’, a communication entitled ‘Single Market Act — Twelve levers to boost growth and strengthen confidence’, a communication entitled ‘Single Market Act II — Together for new growth’, a communication on the Digital Single Market (DSM) Strategy and a number of European Parliament resolutions (including ‘Completing the Digital Single Market’ , ‘Competitive digital single market — eGovernment as a spearhead’ and ‘Towards a Digital Single Market Act’ ). One of the most promising and challenging areas for progress is the Digital Single Market. It opens up new opportunities to boost the economy (e.g. through e commerce), at the same time cutting red tape (through e-government and digitisation of public services). It highlights areas in which current regulations and business practices are failing to keep up with the opportunities created by information and communication technologies.

Free movement of goods

01-11-2017

The free movement of goods, the first of the four fundamental freedoms of the internal market, is secured through the elimination of customs duties and quantitative restrictions, and the prohibition of measures having an equivalent effect. The principles of mutual recognition, elimination of physical and technical barriers, and promotion of standardisation were added in order to continue the completion of the internal market. The adoption of the New Legislative Framework (NLF) in 2008 significantly ...

The free movement of goods, the first of the four fundamental freedoms of the internal market, is secured through the elimination of customs duties and quantitative restrictions, and the prohibition of measures having an equivalent effect. The principles of mutual recognition, elimination of physical and technical barriers, and promotion of standardisation were added in order to continue the completion of the internal market. The adoption of the New Legislative Framework (NLF) in 2008 significantly strengthened product marketing rules, the free movement of goods, the EU’s market surveillance system and the CE mark. The mutual recognition principle was also consolidated, and applies to a wide range of products not covered by EU harmonisation.

The mutual recognition of diplomas

01-11-2017

The freedom of establishment and the freedom to provide services are cornerstones of the single market, enabling the mobility of businesses and professionals throughout the EU. Implementing these freedoms supposes the overall recognition of nationally delivered diplomas and qualifications. Different measures for their harmonisation and mutual recognition have been adopted, and further legislation on the subject is under way.

The freedom of establishment and the freedom to provide services are cornerstones of the single market, enabling the mobility of businesses and professionals throughout the EU. Implementing these freedoms supposes the overall recognition of nationally delivered diplomas and qualifications. Different measures for their harmonisation and mutual recognition have been adopted, and further legislation on the subject is under way.

Consumer policy: principles and instruments

01-11-2017

Research carried out for the European Parliament indicates that effective consumer protection policy is essential for an efficient and well-functioning European market[1]. Improved transparency and better informed transactions resulting from well designed and implemented consumer policy result not only in better solutions for consumers but also in improved market efficiency[2]. Effective consumer protection is therefore an essential element of a properly functioning market. It aims to guarantee consumers ...

Research carried out for the European Parliament indicates that effective consumer protection policy is essential for an efficient and well-functioning European market[1]. Improved transparency and better informed transactions resulting from well designed and implemented consumer policy result not only in better solutions for consumers but also in improved market efficiency[2]. Effective consumer protection is therefore an essential element of a properly functioning market. It aims to guarantee consumers rights vis-à-vis merchants and in addition to provide enhanced protection for vulnerable consumers. The financial crisis has demonstrated that consumer protections rules have the potential to make markets fairer and improve the quality of competition. Empowering consumers and effectively protecting their safety and economic interests have become essential goals of European policy.

Consumer protection measures

01-11-2017

European measures for consumer protection aim to protect the health, safety and economic and legal interests of European consumers, wherever they live, travel or shop in the EU. EU provisions regulate both physical transactions and e-commerce, and contain rules of general applicability together with provisions targeting specific products, including drugs, genetically modified organisms, tobacco products, cosmetics, toys and explosives.

European measures for consumer protection aim to protect the health, safety and economic and legal interests of European consumers, wherever they live, travel or shop in the EU. EU provisions regulate both physical transactions and e-commerce, and contain rules of general applicability together with provisions targeting specific products, including drugs, genetically modified organisms, tobacco products, cosmetics, toys and explosives.

Freedom of establishment and freedom to provide services

01-11-2017

As stipulated in the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and reinforced by the case-law of the European Court of Justice, the freedom of establishment and the freedom to provide services guarantee mobility of businesses and professionals within the EU. For the further implementation of these two freedoms, expectations concerning the Services Directive adopted in 2006 are high, as it is of crucial importance for the completion of the internal market.

As stipulated in the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and reinforced by the case-law of the European Court of Justice, the freedom of establishment and the freedom to provide services guarantee mobility of businesses and professionals within the EU. For the further implementation of these two freedoms, expectations concerning the Services Directive adopted in 2006 are high, as it is of crucial importance for the completion of the internal market.

Public procurement contracts

01-11-2017

Public authorities conclude contracts to ensure the supply of works and delivery of services. These contracts, concluded in exchange for remuneration with one or more operators, are called public contracts and represent an important part of the EU’s GDP. However, only a small percentage of public procurement contracts have been awarded to non-national undertakings. The application of the principles of the internal market to these contracts ensures better allocation of economic resources and more ...

Public authorities conclude contracts to ensure the supply of works and delivery of services. These contracts, concluded in exchange for remuneration with one or more operators, are called public contracts and represent an important part of the EU’s GDP. However, only a small percentage of public procurement contracts have been awarded to non-national undertakings. The application of the principles of the internal market to these contracts ensures better allocation of economic resources and more rational use of public funds. A new public procurement package was adopted in 2014 by Parliament and the Council with the aim of simplifying procedures and making them more flexible in order to encourage access to public procurement for SMEs, and to ensure that greater consideration is given to social and environmental criteria.

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30-08-2018
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06-09-2018
Workshop: Human rights and the rule of law in Cuba and Venezuela
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DROI
25-09-2018
Automation: Putting faces to jobs at risk
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