27

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Policy area
Keyword
Date

Trans-European Networks — guidelines

01-02-2018

The Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) retains the trans-European networks (TENs) in the areas of transport, energy and telecommunications, first mentioned in the Maastricht Treaty, in order to connect all the regions of the EU. These networks are tools intended to contribute to the growth of the internal market and to employment, while pursuing environmental and sustainable development goals. The end of 2013 saw a fundamental reform of the trans-European transport network.

The Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) retains the trans-European networks (TENs) in the areas of transport, energy and telecommunications, first mentioned in the Maastricht Treaty, in order to connect all the regions of the EU. These networks are tools intended to contribute to the growth of the internal market and to employment, while pursuing environmental and sustainable development goals. The end of 2013 saw a fundamental reform of the trans-European transport network.

Financing the Trans-European Networks

01-02-2018

The Trans-European Networks (TENs) are partly funded by the European Union and partly by the Member States. Financial support from the EU serves as a catalyst, the Member States being required to provide the bulk of the financing. The financing of the TENs can also be complemented by Structural Fund assistance, aid from the European Investment Bank or contributions from the private sector. A major reform was introduced across the TENs with the establishment of the Connecting Europe Facility in 2013 ...

The Trans-European Networks (TENs) are partly funded by the European Union and partly by the Member States. Financial support from the EU serves as a catalyst, the Member States being required to provide the bulk of the financing. The financing of the TENs can also be complemented by Structural Fund assistance, aid from the European Investment Bank or contributions from the private sector. A major reform was introduced across the TENs with the establishment of the Connecting Europe Facility in 2013.

Internal energy market

01-02-2018

In order to harmonise and liberalise the EU’s internal energy market, measures have been adopted since 1996 to address market access, transparency and regulation, consumer protection, supporting interconnection, and adequate levels of supply. These measures aim to build a more competitive, customer-centred, flexible and non-discriminatory EU electricity market with market-based supply prices. In so doing, they strengthen and expand the rights of individual customers and energy communities, address ...

In order to harmonise and liberalise the EU’s internal energy market, measures have been adopted since 1996 to address market access, transparency and regulation, consumer protection, supporting interconnection, and adequate levels of supply. These measures aim to build a more competitive, customer-centred, flexible and non-discriminatory EU electricity market with market-based supply prices. In so doing, they strengthen and expand the rights of individual customers and energy communities, address energy poverty, clarify the roles and responsibilities of market participants and regulators and address the security of the supply of electricity, gas and oil, as well as the development of trans-European networks for transporting electricity and gas.

Affordable communications for businesses and consumers

01-02-2018

Information and communication technologies (ICTs) and data and internet access services have taken the place of traditional telephone services as key products for both consumers and businesses. Today, more and more audiovisual content is available on demand and 4G and 5G Internet connectivity is experiencing exponential growth. In response, the EU has set up a regulatory framework for telecommunications covering fixed and wireless telecoms, the Internet, broadcasting and transmission services, made ...

Information and communication technologies (ICTs) and data and internet access services have taken the place of traditional telephone services as key products for both consumers and businesses. Today, more and more audiovisual content is available on demand and 4G and 5G Internet connectivity is experiencing exponential growth. In response, the EU has set up a regulatory framework for telecommunications covering fixed and wireless telecoms, the Internet, broadcasting and transmission services, made up of a series of rules that apply throughout the EU Member States.

General principles of EU industrial policy

01-02-2018

The EU’s industrial policy aims to make European industry more competitive so that it can maintain its role as a driver of sustainable growth and employment in Europe. Various strategies have been adopted in order to ensure better framework conditions for EU industry, the most recent being described in the communication ‘For a European Industrial Renaissance’, of January 2014.

The EU’s industrial policy aims to make European industry more competitive so that it can maintain its role as a driver of sustainable growth and employment in Europe. Various strategies have been adopted in order to ensure better framework conditions for EU industry, the most recent being described in the communication ‘For a European Industrial Renaissance’, of January 2014.

Nuclear energy

01-02-2018

The nuclear power currently produced is released by a process called nuclear fission, which involves the splitting of atoms using uranium to release energy. Nuclear energy is a low-carbon alternative to fossil fuels and represents a critical component in the energy mix of 14 of the 28 EU Member States, accounting for almost 30% of the electricity produced in the EU. However, in the aftermath of the 1986 Chernobyl disaster and the 2011 nuclear catastrophe in Fukushima, Japan, nuclear energy has become ...

The nuclear power currently produced is released by a process called nuclear fission, which involves the splitting of atoms using uranium to release energy. Nuclear energy is a low-carbon alternative to fossil fuels and represents a critical component in the energy mix of 14 of the 28 EU Member States, accounting for almost 30% of the electricity produced in the EU. However, in the aftermath of the 1986 Chernobyl disaster and the 2011 nuclear catastrophe in Fukushima, Japan, nuclear energy has become highly controversial. Germany’s decision to phase out nuclear energy by 2020, as well as the temporary closure of two Belgian reactors after the discovery of cracks in their vessels, has stepped up pressure for the abandonment of nuclear power in Europe. While it is the Member States that choose whether to include nuclear power in their energy mix or not, EU legislation aims at improving the safety standards of nuclear power stations and ensuring that nuclear waste is safely disposed of and handled.

Energy efficiency

01-02-2018

Reducing energy consumption and waste is of growing importance to the EU. In 2007, EU leaders set a target to cut the annual energy consumption of the EU by 20% by 2020. Energy efficiency measures are increasingly recognised as a means not only to achieve a sustainable energy supply, cut greenhouse gas emissions, improve security of supply and reduce import bills, but also to promote the EU’s competitiveness. Energy efficiency is therefore a strategic priority for the Energy Union, and the EU promotes ...

Reducing energy consumption and waste is of growing importance to the EU. In 2007, EU leaders set a target to cut the annual energy consumption of the EU by 20% by 2020. Energy efficiency measures are increasingly recognised as a means not only to achieve a sustainable energy supply, cut greenhouse gas emissions, improve security of supply and reduce import bills, but also to promote the EU’s competitiveness. Energy efficiency is therefore a strategic priority for the Energy Union, and the EU promotes the principle of ‘energy efficiency first’. The future policy framework for the post-2030 period is under discussion.

Innovation policy

01-02-2018

Innovation plays an increasing role in our economy. It provides benefits for citizens as both consumers and workers. It is essential to creating better jobs, building a greener society and improving our quality of life, but also to maintaining EU competitiveness in the global market. Innovation policy is the interface between research and technological development policy and industrial policy and aims to create a conducive framework for bringing ideas to market.

Innovation plays an increasing role in our economy. It provides benefits for citizens as both consumers and workers. It is essential to creating better jobs, building a greener society and improving our quality of life, but also to maintaining EU competitiveness in the global market. Innovation policy is the interface between research and technological development policy and industrial policy and aims to create a conducive framework for bringing ideas to market.

Defence industry

01-02-2018

With a turnover of EUR 97.3 billion in 2014, 500 000 people directly employed and 1.2 million indirect jobs, the European defence industry is a major industrial sector. It is characterised by economic and technological components which are important factors for Europe’s industrial competitiveness. Created in 2004, the European Defence Agency contributes to the development of this industry. The sector is currently facing challenges such as market fragmentation and a decrease in defence spending.

With a turnover of EUR 97.3 billion in 2014, 500 000 people directly employed and 1.2 million indirect jobs, the European defence industry is a major industrial sector. It is characterised by economic and technological components which are important factors for Europe’s industrial competitiveness. Created in 2004, the European Defence Agency contributes to the development of this industry. The sector is currently facing challenges such as market fragmentation and a decrease in defence spending.

Digital Agenda for Europe

01-02-2018

Since 1995, information and communication technologies (ICTs) have driven productivity gains and growth in the EU[1]. Over the past three decades, technological ‘convergence’ has been blurring the boundaries between telecommunications, broadcasting and IT. The Commission launched the digital single market in 2015 to deliver the main legislative proposals, such as boosting e-commerce, copyright, ePrivacy, harmonisation of digital rights, harmonised VAT rules and cybersecurity.

Since 1995, information and communication technologies (ICTs) have driven productivity gains and growth in the EU[1]. Over the past three decades, technological ‘convergence’ has been blurring the boundaries between telecommunications, broadcasting and IT. The Commission launched the digital single market in 2015 to deliver the main legislative proposals, such as boosting e-commerce, copyright, ePrivacy, harmonisation of digital rights, harmonised VAT rules and cybersecurity.

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