6

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Policy area
Keyword
Date

European Research Area

18-05-2016

This Cost of Non-Europe study examines the state of implementation of the current policy framework for the establishment of a European Research Area (ERA). The study combines a backward-looking (ex-post) and a forward-looking (ex-ante) evaluation. While the ex-post evaluation looks at the implementation of the ERA policy framework, the ex-ante assessment focuses on potential costs and benefits of possible further policy action. In doing so, it identifies shortcomings in the ERA policy framework and ...

This Cost of Non-Europe study examines the state of implementation of the current policy framework for the establishment of a European Research Area (ERA). The study combines a backward-looking (ex-post) and a forward-looking (ex-ante) evaluation. While the ex-post evaluation looks at the implementation of the ERA policy framework, the ex-ante assessment focuses on potential costs and benefits of possible further policy action. In doing so, it identifies shortcomings in the ERA policy framework and outlines costs due to the lack of further action on the issue. The study makes a cautious estimate that the costs linked with implementation shortcomings of the ERA policy framework could amount to €3 billion per year.  

Organised Crime and Corruption: Cost of Non-Europe Report

10-03-2016

This study demonstrates the need to tackle organised crime and corruption together as the two are in a mutually reinforcing relationship. Organised crime groups attempt to regulate and control the production and distribution of a given commodity of service unlawfully. In so doing, their aim is to bend the rules in their favour by corrupting officials. Corruption undermines the rule of law, which in turn provides more opportunities for organised criminals to expand their control over the legal economy ...

This study demonstrates the need to tackle organised crime and corruption together as the two are in a mutually reinforcing relationship. Organised crime groups attempt to regulate and control the production and distribution of a given commodity of service unlawfully. In so doing, their aim is to bend the rules in their favour by corrupting officials. Corruption undermines the rule of law, which in turn provides more opportunities for organised criminals to expand their control over the legal economy and politics or even to take over governance tasks in regions and communities. Given their illicit nature and the need to interpret the available criminal justice data within a broader setting, the impact of organised crime and corruption is hard to measure. Within this context it is difficult to estimate with a sufficient degree of certainty an overall Cost of Non-Europe in this policy field. This study does, however, provide scenarios showing the cost of corruption to the European economy. The scenario deemed most feasible by us points to an economic loss in terms of GDP of between 218 and 282 billion euro annually. The study also builds on existing estimates of the size of illicit markets representing a value of around 110 billion euro and points to the significant social and political costs of organised crime and corruption. The study seeks to establish the potential benefits of addressing the gaps and barriers that hinder a more effective fight against organised crime and corruption within the European Union. As combatting organised crime and corruption is a shared competence of the EU and its Member States, our estimates show the potential that could be achieved together by better transposition and enforcement of international and EU norms, filling the outstanding legislative gaps and improving the policy making process and operational cooperation between authorities. Where possible, the benefits of specific policy options to overcome gaps and barriers in the current framework have been quantified. The study demonstrates, based on quantified building blocks, that the Cost of Non-Europe in the field of organised crime and corruption is at least 71 billion euro annually.

Cross-Border Volunteering: Cost of Non-Europe Report

15-07-2015

The study examines the legal, administrative and other barriers to cross-border volunteering which prevent it from achieving its full potential. Those barriers include uncertainty and the risk of forfeiting social security benefits, the unclear framework for obtaining residence permits in some host countries, the lack of clear procedures for the recognition of the skills and competences gained through volunteering, the lack of positive action and information on volunteering opportunities, and insufficient ...

The study examines the legal, administrative and other barriers to cross-border volunteering which prevent it from achieving its full potential. Those barriers include uncertainty and the risk of forfeiting social security benefits, the unclear framework for obtaining residence permits in some host countries, the lack of clear procedures for the recognition of the skills and competences gained through volunteering, the lack of positive action and information on volunteering opportunities, and insufficient preparation and training for volunteers. The cost associated with the barriers to cross border volunteering is estimated at 65 million euro per year, increasing the positive economic benefit by a third mainly through the removal of administrative barriers. While the cost of non-action, in political and economic terms, is relatively modest, stronger EU action would increase its visibility, its socioeconomic contribution and foster increased participation in cross-border volunteering. Please click here for the full publication in PDF format  

External author

Annex I of this study has been written by Levent Altan, Vanessa Leigh, Jelena Milovanovic, Nienke Van Der Burgt (legal/policy analysis) and Guillermo Hernández, Sandra Planes and Gijs Nolet (cost assessment), at the request of the European Added Value Unit of the Directorate for Impact Assessment and European Added Value, within the Directorate General for Parliamentary Research Service of the European Parliament. The study was supported by a panel of senior experts: Gabriella Civico (European Volunteer Centre); Robert Leigh (Senior Consultant, United Nations Volunteers (UNV)); Eberhard Lueder (Red Cross EU Office) and Alix Masson (European Youth Forum). Piotr Sadowski (CSV and Volonteurope) carried out the peer review.

Potential benefits of EU water legislation

16-06-2015

The Water Framework Directive, adopted in December 2000, set an ambitious target of achieving ‘good’ ecological status for all Europe’s rivers by 2015. Today however, 50% of European surface water is of poor ecological status and the chemical status of 40% is ‘unknown’. With better implementation of the legislation, and reaching the target of good ecological status for all European water bodies, the benefits would be at least €2.8 billion a year.

The Water Framework Directive, adopted in December 2000, set an ambitious target of achieving ‘good’ ecological status for all Europe’s rivers by 2015. Today however, 50% of European surface water is of poor ecological status and the chemical status of 40% is ‘unknown’. With better implementation of the legislation, and reaching the target of good ecological status for all European water bodies, the benefits would be at least €2.8 billion a year.

Water legislation: Cost of Non-Europe Report

20-05-2015

This ‘Cost of Non-Europe’ report examines the state of implementation of current EU Water Legislation and identifies the cost of the lack of further European action in this field. The assessment made of existing water legislation confirms that there are still implementation gaps and areas of poor performance. The examination of five case studies, where it was believed that a significant potential exists for further EU action, served to demonstrate that there are several barriers which hinder the ...

This ‘Cost of Non-Europe’ report examines the state of implementation of current EU Water Legislation and identifies the cost of the lack of further European action in this field. The assessment made of existing water legislation confirms that there are still implementation gaps and areas of poor performance. The examination of five case studies, where it was believed that a significant potential exists for further EU action, served to demonstrate that there are several barriers which hinder the achievement of the goals set in the legislation. More European action would accordingly be necessary to limit the impact on Europe's water quality of flooding or of pharmaceutical residues. To limit the use of fresh water more generally, there is a need for European coordination to increase the use of water-efficient equipment and water-metering.  This research makes a cautious estimate that the benefits of full implementation of existing legislation could reach 2.8 billion euro per year. The study also demonstrates that further European action in this field could provide further added value, representing a ‘cost of non-Europe’ of some 25 billion euro per year.

Common unemployment insurance scheme for the euro area

01-10-2014

The European Parliament has called for a “social dimension” to the Economic and Monetary Union to tackle unemployment and restore growth following the recent economic crisis. Among various alternative options, automatic stabilisers could potentially be means of stabilising the Eurozone, while at the same time addressing social problems associated with the financial crisis. This Cost of Non-Europe report explores the prospects for introducing an automatic stabilizer in the form of ...

The European Parliament has called for a “social dimension” to the Economic and Monetary Union to tackle unemployment and restore growth following the recent economic crisis. Among various alternative options, automatic stabilisers could potentially be means of stabilising the Eurozone, while at the same time addressing social problems associated with the financial crisis. This Cost of Non-Europe report explores the prospects for introducing an automatic stabilizer in the form of an Unemployment Insurance Scheme for the euro area, which will provide the monetary union with greater stability in the medium and long term. It builds on two research papers commissioned for the purpose, which are included as annexes. Analysis of its potential benefits, had it existed during the recent crisis, shows that such a scheme would have reduced the fall in GDP in the most affected Member States by 71 billion euro in the period between 2009 and 2012.  

Upcoming events

17-10-2018
Public debate on the future of development with Bill Gates
Hearing -
DEVE
18-10-2018
Policy Dialogue with EUI: EP Elections - Challenges and Opportunities
Other event -
AFCO
18-10-2018
Gender-specific Measures in Anti-trafficking Actions
Hearing -
LIBE FEMM

Partners

Stay connected

email update imageEmail updates system

You can follow anyone or anything linked to the Parliament using the email updates system, which sends updates directly to your mailbox. This includes the latest news about MEPs, committees, the news services or the Think Tank.

You can access the system from any page on the Parliament website. To sign up and receive notifications on Think Tank, simply submit your email address, select the subject you are interested in, indicate how often you want to be informed (daily, weekly or monthly) and confirm the registration by clicking on the link that will be emailed to you.

RSS imageRSS feeds

Follow all news and updates from the European Parliament website by making use of our RSS feed.

Please click on the link below to configure your RSS feed.

widget imageRSS widgets

Please click on the button below to add a widget covering publications available via the Think Tank to your website.

Create a RSS widget