31

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EU policies – Delivering for citizens: Promoting European culture

22-06-2018

The concept of cultural diversity lies at the heart of the European project. Recent years have seen renewed interest in the sector's potential for promoting social cohesion, unity and tolerance, on the one hand, with continued recognition of its valuable economic role, on the other. There is a strong commitment at the EU level to ensure that culture is mainstreamed in all policy areas, with a special focus on the protection of cultural heritage and cultural diversity, which are key elements in cultural ...

The concept of cultural diversity lies at the heart of the European project. Recent years have seen renewed interest in the sector's potential for promoting social cohesion, unity and tolerance, on the one hand, with continued recognition of its valuable economic role, on the other. There is a strong commitment at the EU level to ensure that culture is mainstreamed in all policy areas, with a special focus on the protection of cultural heritage and cultural diversity, which are key elements in cultural identity and expression. From the economic point of view, the cultural and creative sector, which employs 8.4 million people in the European Union, is dynamic and has a large potential for growth due to its diversity and scope for individual creative freedom. Yet the development of this potential is hampered by barriers, notably linguistic diversity, fragmentation and different financial mechanisms across the EU. The EU's cultural and creative industry also faces challenge from digital technologies and global competition, particularly from the United States' (US) audiovisual industry, and from US and Chinese diplomatic efforts to promote their cultural output. Under the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, the EU's role in the context of cultural policy is a supportive and complementary one, direct responsibility in the area being largely a matter for the individual Member States. Nevertheless, since 2014, these challenges have been addressed at the EU level, inter alia via the strengthening of the digital single market, which is essential for access to culture, the circulation of European cultural works, the fair remuneration of creators and fair competition. Since the economic crisis, additional funding has also been made available for the sector via the European Fund for Strategic Investment introduced by the Juncker Commission in 2015. As indicated in a 2017 European Commission communication on the role of culture and education, the synergies between the socio-economic aspects are to be enhanced. The European Year of Cultural Heritage in 2018 is to feed into a reflection and actions related to shared culture and history. These issues are addressed in the New European Agenda for Culture, while the new multiannual financial framework for 2021-2027 envisages increased funding for culture. This will also support efforts to combine artistic and technological skills, which are a prerequisite for artistic expression in the new digital environment.

Barriers to accessing culture

06-06-2018

Culture as a means of expression and identity plays an important role for a coherent and tolerant society, and for creative and talented individuals to thrive. The European Union has a rich and diverse culture but not all its citizens actively participate in it, either as 'consumers' or as amateur artists. During its June session the European Parliament is expected to discuss an own-initiative report analysing the reasons for this situation.

Culture as a means of expression and identity plays an important role for a coherent and tolerant society, and for creative and talented individuals to thrive. The European Union has a rich and diverse culture but not all its citizens actively participate in it, either as 'consumers' or as amateur artists. During its June session the European Parliament is expected to discuss an own-initiative report analysing the reasons for this situation.

Cultural heritage in EU policies

22-05-2018

2018 is devoted to the European Union's cultural heritage. This paper focuses on the evolution of the very notion of cultural heritage, its role and place in society, as well as the way it is perceived and interpreted in the context of related EU prerogatives. The European Year of Cultural Heritage 2018 is a result of this evolution, and allows EU citizens to gain a broad understanding of their cultural heritage in all its aspects, democratically share responsibility for it, celebrate it and benefit ...

2018 is devoted to the European Union's cultural heritage. This paper focuses on the evolution of the very notion of cultural heritage, its role and place in society, as well as the way it is perceived and interpreted in the context of related EU prerogatives. The European Year of Cultural Heritage 2018 is a result of this evolution, and allows EU citizens to gain a broad understanding of their cultural heritage in all its aspects, democratically share responsibility for it, celebrate it and benefit from the creation it inspires. Despite the fact that the EU has limited powers in respect of cultural heritage – the role of the European institutions is generally limited to financial support, coordination of joint projects and efforts, and sharing of knowledge – it has contributed to raising awareness about preservation, conservation and restoration issues, technological research (for example 3D reconstructions) and scientific progress in technological solutions. Furthermore, the EU has become an international expert in the field. Cultural heritage has been taken into consideration in numerous EU funding programmes, which has allowed Member States to undertake action to revive their national or local heritage, keep their traditions and crafts, and thereby develop their cultural tourism. The European Parliament has adopted resolutions highlighting, inter alia, the dangers from which cultural heritage is to be protected both in the EU and the world, and underlining the necessity to address trafficking and looting of cultural heritage artefacts, the protection of cultural heritage, including traditional crafts, and the role of cultural heritage in sustanainable tourism.

International Roma Day: How the European Union supports the study of Roma culture, language and history

03-04-2018

International Roma Day, marked on 8 April, is devoted to Europe's largest ethnic minority, the Roma, a predominant part of whom suffer from discrimination and isolation. This day also focuses on Roma history, culture, language and aspirations, which remain largely unknown in Europe, even though they are key to mutual understanding and can contribute to closing the gap between communities. The study and promotion of Roma culture and language fall under the remit of legislation concerning the preservation ...

International Roma Day, marked on 8 April, is devoted to Europe's largest ethnic minority, the Roma, a predominant part of whom suffer from discrimination and isolation. This day also focuses on Roma history, culture, language and aspirations, which remain largely unknown in Europe, even though they are key to mutual understanding and can contribute to closing the gap between communities. The study and promotion of Roma culture and language fall under the remit of legislation concerning the preservation of cultural and linguistic diversity on the one hand, and the protection of minority languages, on the other, as provided for by the EU Treaties and the Council of Europe Charter for Regional and Minority Languages. The EU offers support for the preservation of the Roma language, Romani, and its numerous local dialects, some of which are endangered and could disappear. The EU allocates funds to the study of Roma history, culture and language, while some EU Member States have also put in place programmes that include the teaching of Roma culture, history and language in primary schools.

Jewish communities in the European Union

18-01-2018

Europe’s Jewish population has been diminishing in recent decades, and a growing number of anti-Semitic acts and anti-Jewish violence have been occurring in recent years in the EU. In defence of its values, including respect for minorities, the EU undertakes and funds actions to counter anti-Semitism. This is an updated version of an 'at a glance' note published in September 2016 - PE 589.770.

Europe’s Jewish population has been diminishing in recent decades, and a growing number of anti-Semitic acts and anti-Jewish violence have been occurring in recent years in the EU. In defence of its values, including respect for minorities, the EU undertakes and funds actions to counter anti-Semitism. This is an updated version of an 'at a glance' note published in September 2016 - PE 589.770.

Article 17 TFEU: The EU institutions’ dialogue with confessional and non-confessional organisations

18-01-2018

On the basis of Article 17 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU), the European institutions hold high-level meetings, or working dialogue seminars, on an annual basis with churches and non-confessional and philosophical organisations. This dialogue, focused on issues upon the European agenda, can be traced back to earlier initiatives, such as that launched in 1994 by Jacques Delors – 'A Soul for Europe' – which opened the way to encompass ethical and spiritual aspects of European ...

On the basis of Article 17 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU), the European institutions hold high-level meetings, or working dialogue seminars, on an annual basis with churches and non-confessional and philosophical organisations. This dialogue, focused on issues upon the European agenda, can be traced back to earlier initiatives, such as that launched in 1994 by Jacques Delors – 'A Soul for Europe' – which opened the way to encompass ethical and spiritual aspects of European integration. The draft Constitutional Treaty of 2004 included provisions on regular, open and transparent dialogue between EU institutions, representatives of churches and religious communities, and of non-confessional or philosophical communities. Although the Constitutional Treaty was rejected in French and Dutch referenda, its successor, the Lisbon Treaty adopted in 2007 and in force since December 2009, preserved the same provisions in Article 17 TFEU. The European Parliament has adopted numerous resolutions in defence of the principles of freedom of religion and belief as well as religious pluralism and tolerance, and stressed the importance of constant dialogue among, and with, religious as well as non-confessional and philosophical communities. It has regularly organised dialogue sessions within the framework of Article 17 TFEU on subjects of interest for the EU and its citizens. This is a further updated and expanded version of an 'at a glance' note originally published in November 2015.

The European Union and Holocaust

18-01-2018

The term Holocaust refers to the mass murder of 6 million European Jews, Roma and other persecuted groups whom the Nazi regime and its collaborators sought to annihilate. The expropriation of property, state discrimination and persecution of the Jews by the Nazi regime began in 1933, followed by pogroms and incarceration in concentration camps. Ultimately, the policy was extended to all the European territories and countries controlled by the Nazis during the Second World War. It was a policy that ...

The term Holocaust refers to the mass murder of 6 million European Jews, Roma and other persecuted groups whom the Nazi regime and its collaborators sought to annihilate. The expropriation of property, state discrimination and persecution of the Jews by the Nazi regime began in 1933, followed by pogroms and incarceration in concentration camps. Ultimately, the policy was extended to all the European territories and countries controlled by the Nazis during the Second World War. It was a policy that would culminate in mass summary executions (‘Holocaust by Bullets’) and extermination camps. The perpetrators were prosecuted at the Nuremberg trials in 1945-1946, but the charge of crimes against humanity was preferred over genocide. It was not until 2005, on the occasion of the 60th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz, that a United Nations resolution on Holocaust remembrance designated 27 January as the day of commemoration. In the European Union, numerous programmes seek to preserve the memory of these tragic events in the history of our continent. Since 1995, the European Parliament has adopted resolutions drawing attention to our obligation to remember not only through commemorations but also through education.

Arts, culture, and cultural awareness in education

09-11-2017

Cultural and educational policies can contribute to the development of skills needed to cope with the complexity of contemporary multicultural societies, and to qualify for jobs in the fast-growing creative and cultural industries. This is supported by research on learning processes and the impact of art and cultural education. Both Unesco and the OECD have called for a proper place for, and recognition of, art and culture in education. In the EU, competence for culture and education policies lies ...

Cultural and educational policies can contribute to the development of skills needed to cope with the complexity of contemporary multicultural societies, and to qualify for jobs in the fast-growing creative and cultural industries. This is supported by research on learning processes and the impact of art and cultural education. Both Unesco and the OECD have called for a proper place for, and recognition of, art and culture in education. In the EU, competence for culture and education policies lies with the Member States, though the EU plays a role too, by supporting them financially, and supplementing and coordinating their efforts in this field. A 2006 European Parliament and Council recommendation on key competences included cultural awareness and expression as a transversal competence. This was understood to comprise knowledge of particular works of art from local, regional, national and European cultural heritage; their relationship to other cultures worldwide; self-expression in various media, styles, and forms; and openness to intercultural communication. The European Commission continues to support projects to modernise education. In 2017, it launched a public consultation on the revision of the key skills and competencies needed for the labour market of the future, with a view to updating them. The European Parliament has undertaken work on the subject in an own-initiative report.

Dialogue of the EU institutions with religious and non-confessional organisations

16-10-2017

Every year the European institutions hold dialogue sessions with churches, and with non-confessional and philosophical organisations. Based on Article 17 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) the dialogue focuses on issues on the European agenda. This is an update of an 'at a glance' note published in June 2017.

Every year the European institutions hold dialogue sessions with churches, and with non-confessional and philosophical organisations. Based on Article 17 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) the dialogue focuses on issues on the European agenda. This is an update of an 'at a glance' note published in June 2017.

Celebrating European cultural heritage in 2018

13-09-2017

A Commission proposal paving the way to the designation of 2018 as the European Year of Cultural Heritage was adopted by the European Parliament in plenary in April, and subsequently by the Council. 2018 will thus be dedicated to European cultural heritage and its role in the continent's shared history and values, following a recommendation made by Parliament.

A Commission proposal paving the way to the designation of 2018 as the European Year of Cultural Heritage was adopted by the European Parliament in plenary in April, and subsequently by the Council. 2018 will thus be dedicated to European cultural heritage and its role in the continent's shared history and values, following a recommendation made by Parliament.

Upcoming events

04-09-2018
Fiscal stabilization capacity for the Euro area: Latest thinking from the IMF
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25-09-2018
Automation: Putting faces to jobs at risk
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