23

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Policy area
Keyword
Date

European territorial cooperation (Interreg) 2021-2027

05-10-2018

On 29 May 2018, the European Commission adopted several proposals aimed at defining the architecture of EU cohesion policy for the post-2020 programming period. The package includes a proposal for the new generation of European territorial cooperation (ETC) programmes, commonly referred to as 'Interreg'. The proposed regulation would bring significant changes to the current architecture of ETC, with the reshaping of the three traditional cooperation strands (i.e. crossborder, transnational and interregional ...

On 29 May 2018, the European Commission adopted several proposals aimed at defining the architecture of EU cohesion policy for the post-2020 programming period. The package includes a proposal for the new generation of European territorial cooperation (ETC) programmes, commonly referred to as 'Interreg'. The proposed regulation would bring significant changes to the current architecture of ETC, with the reshaping of the three traditional cooperation strands (i.e. crossborder, transnational and interregional cooperation) and the creation of two new components, one dedicated to outermost regions, the other to interregional cooperation on innovation. Another major novelty is the incorporation of cooperation with countries other than EU Member States. The proposal is being examined simultaneously by the Council and the European Parliament. In Parliament, the Committee on Regional Development (REGI) is responsible for the file. The rapporteur released his draft report on 26 July 2018. The REGI committee is expected to vote on it in December 2018.

EYE event - Sport without corruption

16-05-2018

Played and watched by billions of people across the globe, sport embodies specific values, such as fair play and respect for the rules. Corruption scandals such as those that have made headlines in recent years, be it in football or athletics, seriously tarnish its image, shaking public trust.

Played and watched by billions of people across the globe, sport embodies specific values, such as fair play and respect for the rules. Corruption scandals such as those that have made headlines in recent years, be it in football or athletics, seriously tarnish its image, shaking public trust.

EYE event - Sustainable city: Global picture, local colour

16-05-2018

Cities, home to most of the world's people and growing rapidly, are often where environmental problems both emerge and are resolved; they are where the fight for global sustainability will be won or lost.

Cities, home to most of the world's people and growing rapidly, are often where environmental problems both emerge and are resolved; they are where the fight for global sustainability will be won or lost.

Cities: Front line of climate action

16-02-2018

Cities have a crucial role to play in addressing the climate change challenge and delivering on the ambitions of the Paris Agreement. In the European Union (EU), where nearly three quarters of the population live in urban areas, many cities are leading the way in this regard, taking action in three areas central to increasing energy efficiency and reducing emissions – namely, buildings, energy supply, and transport – and acting as living laboratories of climate-change-related innovation. The EU supports ...

Cities have a crucial role to play in addressing the climate change challenge and delivering on the ambitions of the Paris Agreement. In the European Union (EU), where nearly three quarters of the population live in urban areas, many cities are leading the way in this regard, taking action in three areas central to increasing energy efficiency and reducing emissions – namely, buildings, energy supply, and transport – and acting as living laboratories of climate-change-related innovation. The EU supports cities in their efforts by providing guidance, promoting experience-and knowledge-sharing, fostering cooperation, and funding climate action. Climate-relevant initiatives are in place in various policy fields, from transport to the environment, research and innovation, the most high-profile being the Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy, which currently counts over 7 700 signatories. A supportive framework is essential to ensure city-level initiatives have enough resources and potential to effect meaningful change. Easing access to climate funding and strengthening the role of cities in climate governance are among the main challenges ahead, and the main demands of city associations. The latter issue is currently in the spotlight, notably in relation to the proposal for a regulation on energy union governance, part of the EU clean energy package. The European Parliament adopted amendments to the proposed regulation in January 2018. The role of EU regions and cities in implementing the Paris Agreement is also the subject of an own-initiative report, scheduled for debate during the March plenary session. This briefing is an update of an earlier one published in October 2017.

Cities: Front line of climate action

05-10-2017

Cities have a crucial role to play in addressing the climate change challenge and delivering on the ambitions of the Paris Agreement. In the European Union (EU), where nearly three quarters of the population live in urban areas, many cities are leading the way in this regard, taking action in three areas central to increasing energy efficiency and reducing emissions – namely, buildings, energy supply, and transport – and acting as living laboratories of climate-change-related innovation. The EU supports ...

Cities have a crucial role to play in addressing the climate change challenge and delivering on the ambitions of the Paris Agreement. In the European Union (EU), where nearly three quarters of the population live in urban areas, many cities are leading the way in this regard, taking action in three areas central to increasing energy efficiency and reducing emissions – namely, buildings, energy supply, and transport – and acting as living laboratories of climate-change-related innovation. The EU supports cities in their efforts by providing guidance, promoting experience-and knowledge-sharing, fostering cooperation, and funding climate action. Climate-relevant initiatives are in place in various policy fields, from transport to the environment, research and innovation, the most high profile being the Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy, which currently counts some 7 600 signatories. A supportive framework is essential to ensure city-level initiatives have enough resources and potential to effect meaningful change. Easing access to climate funding and strengthening the role of cities in climate governance are among the main challenges ahead, and the main demands of city associations. The latter issue is being examined by the European Parliament, notably in relation to the proposal for a regulation on energy union governance. Two own-initiative reports exploring the role cities play, first, in the implementation of the Paris Agreement, and, second, in the institutional framework of the Union, are also under preparation.

Sustainable tourism: The environmental dimension

13-03-2017

Tourism is the third largest economic sector in the European Union (EU). It is estimated to employ a total of 17 million people, and its overall contribution to the economy is close to 10 % of EU gross domestic product. Tourism has a special, two-way relationship with the environment. On the one hand, the quality of the environment is essential to tourism’s success, as this is very often what attracts people to visit a place, and persuades them to go back. On the other hand, tourism can become the ...

Tourism is the third largest economic sector in the European Union (EU). It is estimated to employ a total of 17 million people, and its overall contribution to the economy is close to 10 % of EU gross domestic product. Tourism has a special, two-way relationship with the environment. On the one hand, the quality of the environment is essential to tourism’s success, as this is very often what attracts people to visit a place, and persuades them to go back. On the other hand, tourism can become the vector of significant pressures and impacts on the environment. Potential adverse effects of tourism development relate to three main areas: strain on natural resources; pollution; and physical impacts, typically involving the degradation of ecosystems. Climate change and tourism are closely interlinked. While the tourism sector contributes to greenhouse gas emissions, for the most part derived from the transport of tourists, it also faces profound impacts from global warming. The beach , winter- and nature-based tourism segments are likely to be most affected. Research points to a lack of relevant, EU-wide, recent and detailed data about the impacts of tourism on the environment. The European Environment Agency is working on the elaboration of a reporting mechanism on the tourism and environment relationship, based on several indicators, many of which are consistent with the European tourism indicators system for sustainable destination management (ETIS), developed as part of EU action to promote tourism sustainability.

Towards an integrated approach to sports policy

26-01-2017

Ahead of the upcoming discussions on a new European Union (EU) work plan for sport, an own-initiative report to be presented to Parliament's first February plenary session takes stock of the implementation of EU sports policy to date, and formulates recommendations on its future course.

Ahead of the upcoming discussions on a new European Union (EU) work plan for sport, an own-initiative report to be presented to Parliament's first February plenary session takes stock of the implementation of EU sports policy to date, and formulates recommendations on its future course.

Good governance in sport

23-01-2017

Historically, sports organisations have enjoyed considerable autonomy in running and regulating sport. This autonomy, strongly defended by sports authorities as a means to safeguard the inherent sporting values from external influence is increasingly being challenged, and made conditional on compliance with good governance principles, including those of democracy, transparency, accountability in decision-making, and representative inclusiveness. While sport organisations have taken steps to enhance ...

Historically, sports organisations have enjoyed considerable autonomy in running and regulating sport. This autonomy, strongly defended by sports authorities as a means to safeguard the inherent sporting values from external influence is increasingly being challenged, and made conditional on compliance with good governance principles, including those of democracy, transparency, accountability in decision-making, and representative inclusiveness. While sport organisations have taken steps to enhance their governance standards, independent reports suggest that much remains to be done. The European Union’s action for good governance in sport, mainly taking the form of recommendations and financial support for specific initiatives, has delivered some concrete outcomes, including the development of a set of principles applicable to organisations across the whole sport movement. A pledge to implement good governance in European sport, to which 32 federations and organisations have committed so far, was launched during the September 2016 European week of sport. The European Parliament is actively working on the topic of good governance, one of the three pillars of its ongoing own-initiative report on ‘An integrated approach to sport policy’. The text is due to be presented to Parliament’s first February plenary session, ahead of the drafting of the next EU work plan for sport for the 2017-2020 period, to be negotiated under the Maltese Presidency of the Council. A trend towards cooperative approaches to good governance in sport can be seen, including examples such as the future 'international sport integrity partnership'.

Smart specialisation: The concept and its application to EU cohesion policy

04-10-2016

The persistent gap between European regions as regards research and innovation performance provides a strong case for policies tailored to the local context that foster structural change. This is where smart specialisation comes into play, providing a path for innovation-driven differentiation and economic transformation, building on local assets and comparative strengths. To achieve maximum impact, efforts and investments are expected to focus on a limited number of priorities, identified through ...

The persistent gap between European regions as regards research and innovation performance provides a strong case for policies tailored to the local context that foster structural change. This is where smart specialisation comes into play, providing a path for innovation-driven differentiation and economic transformation, building on local assets and comparative strengths. To achieve maximum impact, efforts and investments are expected to focus on a limited number of priorities, identified through a discovery process in which entrepreneurs play a central role. This place-based approach and logic of prioritisation have been found to be broadly consistent with the overall reforms of EU cohesion policy, aiming to improve spending efficiency and impact. Consequently, having a research and innovation strategy for smart specialisation (RIS3) in place has become a prerequisite to receiving funding from the European Regional Development Fund. Currently, 121 smart specialisation strategies are in place at national or regional levels. With a view to assessing how they are being implemented, the European Commission organised a high-level conference in June 2016 to evaluate progress and difficulties to date. The European Parliament, in a newly adopted resolution on RIS3 and cohesion policy, asked for periodic (annual and mid-term) monitoring of the strategies’ implementation, and called on the European Commission to push for a review in 2017 to enhance their efficiency and effectiveness. This is an update of an earlier briefing published in January 2016.

Sustainability and EU cohesion policy

04-10-2016

Working for Europe's sustainable development by protecting and improving the quality of the environment, for instance, is one of the core missions entrusted to the European Union by the Treaties. As the EU's main investment policy, accounting for almost a third of the total EU budget in the 2014-2020 period, cohesion policy has the potential to contribute significantly to achieving this ambition. Provisions are in place to mainstream environmental concerns and protection requirements into the preparation ...

Working for Europe's sustainable development by protecting and improving the quality of the environment, for instance, is one of the core missions entrusted to the European Union by the Treaties. As the EU's main investment policy, accounting for almost a third of the total EU budget in the 2014-2020 period, cohesion policy has the potential to contribute significantly to achieving this ambition. Provisions are in place to mainstream environmental concerns and protection requirements into the preparation and implementation of cohesion policy supported programmes and projects. Significantly, approval for financial assistance is subject to compliance with the directives on environmental assessment. The cohesion policy funds make considerable support available for investment in areas of particular relevance to sustainable development, such as environmental protection and resource efficiency (over €35 billion); the low-carbon economy (almost €40 billion) and climate change adaptation. Through this funding, cohesion policy is expected to play a significant role in advancing the implementation of EU environmental policies and in helping the EU achieve its objectives for energy, climate, and the circular economy. Initial insight into cohesion policy's environmental performance can be gained from recent reports on the ex-post evaluation of cohesion policy programmes in the 2007-2013 period regarding waste management and water; the impact of EU policies on land; and the use of EU funds to support the clean energy transition in central and eastern Europe.

Upcoming events

17-10-2018
Public debate on the future of development with Bill Gates
Hearing -
DEVE
18-10-2018
Policy Dialogue with EUI: EP Elections - Challenges and Opportunities
Other event -
AFCO
18-10-2018
Gender-specific Measures in Anti-trafficking Actions
Hearing -
LIBE FEMM

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