26

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Policy area
Keyword
Date

The Istanbul Convention: A tool to tackle violence against women and girls

05-09-2017

The Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence (Istanbul Convention) is the first instrument in Europe to set legally binding standards specifically to prevent gender-based violence, protect victims of violence and punish perpetrators. Following the EU’s signing of the Convention in June 2017, the European Parliament’s consent is required for the EU’s accession to the Convention. Pending Council’s formal request for that consent, Parliament ...

The Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence (Istanbul Convention) is the first instrument in Europe to set legally binding standards specifically to prevent gender-based violence, protect victims of violence and punish perpetrators. Following the EU’s signing of the Convention in June 2017, the European Parliament’s consent is required for the EU’s accession to the Convention. Pending Council’s formal request for that consent, Parliament is due to discuss an interim report on the process in September 2017.

The rights of LGBTI people in the European Union

12-05-2017

The prohibition of discrimination and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as a ground of discrimination. However, the scope of these provisions is limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare, education and ...

The prohibition of discrimination and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as a ground of discrimination. However, the scope of these provisions is limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare, education and access to goods and services, leaving LGBTI people particularly vulnerable in these areas. Moreover, EU competence does not extend to recognition of marital or family status. In this area, national regulations vary, with some Member States offering same-sex couples the right to marry, others allowing alternative forms of registration, and yet others not providing any legal status for same-sex couples. Same-sex couples may or may not have the right to adopt children and to access assisted reproduction. These divergent legal statuses have implications, for instance, for partners from two Member States with different standards who want to formalise/legalise their relationship or for same-sex couples and their families wishing to move to another Member State. Combating discrimination has become part of EU internal and external policies and the subject of numerous resolutions of the European Parliament. However, action in this area remains problematic when it touches on issues pertaining to areas traditionally reserved to Member States, such as marital status and family law. This is a further updated version of a briefing originally drafted by Piotr Bakowski. The previous edition was published in May 2016, PE 582.031.

Assessing progress towards gender equality

10-03-2017

International Women's Day on 8 March provides an opportunity to take stock of progress towards gender equality. Three own-initiative reports by the European Parliament’s Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality (FEMM), highlighting persistent gender inequalities and emerging issues in the European Union, are on the agenda for the plenary in March 2017.

International Women's Day on 8 March provides an opportunity to take stock of progress towards gender equality. Three own-initiative reports by the European Parliament’s Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality (FEMM), highlighting persistent gender inequalities and emerging issues in the European Union, are on the agenda for the plenary in March 2017.

Empowering women in the EU and beyond: Labour market

02-03-2017

Equal access to the labour market is recognised as a cornerstone of women’s economic independence and participation in public life. The EU and its Member States have obligations to integrate those excluded from the labour market (Article 151 TFEU), advance gender equality in employment (Article 153 TFEU; Directive 2006/54/ EC), and ensure equal pay for work of equal value (Article 157 TFEU). All EU Member States have ratified the 1979 UN Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination ...

Equal access to the labour market is recognised as a cornerstone of women’s economic independence and participation in public life. The EU and its Member States have obligations to integrate those excluded from the labour market (Article 151 TFEU), advance gender equality in employment (Article 153 TFEU; Directive 2006/54/ EC), and ensure equal pay for work of equal value (Article 157 TFEU). All EU Member States have ratified the 1979 UN Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination against Women, which upholds women’s rights to work, equal opportunities and social benefits (Article 11).

Empowering women in the EU and beyond: Economic and financial resources

02-03-2017

Ensuring that women have equal access to economic and financial resources and benefit equally from economic opportunities and growth has been recognised as a vital contribution towards gender equality, poverty eradication and sustainable development. This principle is embedded in numerous international instruments, including the current UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) which are binding on the EU and its Member States. The first report from a new United Nation (UN) high-level panel, created ...

Ensuring that women have equal access to economic and financial resources and benefit equally from economic opportunities and growth has been recognised as a vital contribution towards gender equality, poverty eradication and sustainable development. This principle is embedded in numerous international instruments, including the current UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) which are binding on the EU and its Member States. The first report from a new United Nation (UN) high-level panel, created to find concrete ways of implementing the SDGs related to women’s economic empowerment, has identified a number of interconnected areas where action is needed. One priority is to ensure that women have access to and control over finances and assets, both for their economic security and for building wealth. Other priorities include: securing decent jobs and equal pay and creating an enabling environment by investing in public services and infrastructure (including child and elderly care); changing business practices and discriminatory laws; and developing gender-sensitive (macro)economic and social policies. Women’s participation in economic decision-making through leadership and collective action is also vital to allow equal opportunities to shape economic structures. Measures must therefore address factors linked to women’s experiences and to the wider structural conditions that determine them, particularly the value given to women’s unpaid work.

Zero tolerance for female genital mutilation

27-01-2017

The European Union is committed to working collectively to eradicate female genital mutilation (FGM) as part of broader efforts to combat all forms of violence against women and girls, and to support the efforts of its Member States in this field. The European Commission is due to update MEPs on the progress made towards the objectives set out in its FGM action plan during the Parliament's plenary session in February. This publication updates an 'at a glance' note published in January 2015.

The European Union is committed to working collectively to eradicate female genital mutilation (FGM) as part of broader efforts to combat all forms of violence against women and girls, and to support the efforts of its Member States in this field. The European Commission is due to update MEPs on the progress made towards the objectives set out in its FGM action plan during the Parliament's plenary session in February. This publication updates an 'at a glance' note published in January 2015.

Cross-border aspects of adoptions

26-01-2017

At present, there is no guarantee that domestic adoptions carried out in one EU Member State will be recognised automatically in another. The resulting hurdles facing families who move to another EU country after adopting a child can interfere with their freedom of movement, harm children’s rights, and impose significant costs. The European Parliament has identified scope for EU legal action in this area and further cooperation on several other cross-border aspects of adoption. A legislative own-initiative ...

At present, there is no guarantee that domestic adoptions carried out in one EU Member State will be recognised automatically in another. The resulting hurdles facing families who move to another EU country after adopting a child can interfere with their freedom of movement, harm children’s rights, and impose significant costs. The European Parliament has identified scope for EU legal action in this area and further cooperation on several other cross-border aspects of adoption. A legislative own-initiative report is due to be debated in plenary in February.

Violence against women in the EU: State of play

25-11-2016

Violence against women is a violation of human rights and a form of gender-based discrimination. Rooted in inequalities between men and women, it takes many forms. Estimates about the scale of the problem are alarming. Such violence has a major impact on victims and imposes a significant cost burden on society. The instruments put in place by the United Nations and Council of Europe are benchmarks in efforts to combat violence against women. The EU is tackling the problem in various ways, but has ...

Violence against women is a violation of human rights and a form of gender-based discrimination. Rooted in inequalities between men and women, it takes many forms. Estimates about the scale of the problem are alarming. Such violence has a major impact on victims and imposes a significant cost burden on society. The instruments put in place by the United Nations and Council of Europe are benchmarks in efforts to combat violence against women. The EU is tackling the problem in various ways, but has no binding instrument designed specifically to protect women from violence. Although there are similarities between national policies to combat violence against women, the Member States have adopted different approaches to the problem. Parliament’s efforts have focused on strengthening EU policy in the area. Parliament has repeatedly called for a European Union strategy to counter violence against women, including a legally binding instrument. Stakeholders have expressed a range of concerns, such as the impact of the current economic climate on the prevalence of violence and funding for prevention and support for victims, and have highlighted the need for a comprehensive EU political framework on eliminating violence against women. They have also launched new initiatives of their own. This is a further update of an earlier briefing by Anna Dimitrova-Stull, of February 2014.

'Harmful practices' as a form of violence against women and girls

25-11-2016

Violence against women and girls is prevalent across the world and in all societies, but the forms it takes vary and change over time. In recent years, a number of forms of violence, some of which had not previously been documented in Europe, have become an increasing concern. Three specific practices, which have become an issue in some EU countries are 'honour' crimes, early/forced marriage and female genital mutilation (FGM). These manifestations of gender-based violence, which are classified as ...

Violence against women and girls is prevalent across the world and in all societies, but the forms it takes vary and change over time. In recent years, a number of forms of violence, some of which had not previously been documented in Europe, have become an increasing concern. Three specific practices, which have become an issue in some EU countries are 'honour' crimes, early/forced marriage and female genital mutilation (FGM). These manifestations of gender-based violence, which are classified as 'harmful practices' in international human rights instruments, are carried out on women and girls as part of accepted tradition or cultural practice, by families or communities. They have a major impact on victims, causing physical and psychological harm, and limiting their capacity to participate fully in society or develop and reach their full potential. Although there is growing awareness of the problem on the part of the European Union and individual Member States, legislative and policy responses to FGM and other harmful practices are still reported to be lagging behind those for other forms of violence against women. Further policy challenges are raised by the fact that, as a result of crises and conflict, such practices are also reported to be re-emerging or becoming more acute in some areas of the world. Other forms of harm, which affect women and girls in Europe, may also warrant classification as 'harmful practices'. This is an introduction to a series of individual briefings on the issues of 'honour' crimes, forced/early marriage, FGM and emerging forms of harm, looking in detail at action at national and EU levels. An overall analysis of the EU legislative framework and policy initiatives on violence against women is available in the briefing, Violence against Women in the EU: State of Play. Please click here for the full publication in PDF format

Universal Children's Day

18-11-2016

The annual Universal Children's Day represents an opportunity to consider how children in Europe are faring in some of the key areas covered in the Convention on the Rights of the Child and what the European Union is doing to protect their rights and ensure their wellbeing.

The annual Universal Children's Day represents an opportunity to consider how children in Europe are faring in some of the key areas covered in the Convention on the Rights of the Child and what the European Union is doing to protect their rights and ensure their wellbeing.

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24-10-2017
EXHIBITION: The 60th anniversary of the two founding Treaties
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07-11-2017
Area of Freedom, Security and Justice: The untapped potential
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07-11-2017
Round table discussion: Being European
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