182

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Policy area
Author
Keyword
Date

The European Central Bank (ECB)

01-11-2017

The European Central Bank (ECB) is the central institution of the Economic and Monetary Union and has been responsible for conducting monetary policy for the euro area since 1 January 1999. The ECB and the national central banks of all EU Member States constitute the European System of Central Banks. The primary objective of the European System of Central Banks is to maintain price stability. Since 4 November 2014 the ECB has been responsible for specific tasks concerning policies relating to the ...

The European Central Bank (ECB) is the central institution of the Economic and Monetary Union and has been responsible for conducting monetary policy for the euro area since 1 January 1999. The ECB and the national central banks of all EU Member States constitute the European System of Central Banks. The primary objective of the European System of Central Banks is to maintain price stability. Since 4 November 2014 the ECB has been responsible for specific tasks concerning policies relating to the prudential supervision of credit institutions within the framework of the Single Supervisory Mechanism. As a banking supervisor, the ECB also has an advisory role in assessing the resolution plans of credit institutions.

The European Investment Bank

01-11-2017

The European Investment Bank (EIB) furthers the objectives of the European Union by providing long-term project funding, guarantees and advice. It supports projects both within and outside the EU. Its shareholders are the Member States of the EU. The EIB is the majority shareholder in the European Investment Fund (EIF) and, together with the latter, makes up the EIB Group. Within the Investment Plan for Europe proposed by the Commission, the EIB Group is part of a broader strategy aimed at overcoming ...

The European Investment Bank (EIB) furthers the objectives of the European Union by providing long-term project funding, guarantees and advice. It supports projects both within and outside the EU. Its shareholders are the Member States of the EU. The EIB is the majority shareholder in the European Investment Fund (EIF) and, together with the latter, makes up the EIB Group. Within the Investment Plan for Europe proposed by the Commission, the EIB Group is part of a broader strategy aimed at overcoming the large investment gap by relieving investors of some of the risk inherent in projects.

Free movement of goods

01-11-2017

The free movement of goods, the first of the four fundamental freedoms of the internal market, is secured through the elimination of customs duties and quantitative restrictions, and the prohibition of measures having an equivalent effect. The principles of mutual recognition, elimination of physical and technical barriers, and promotion of standardisation were added in order to continue the completion of the internal market. The adoption of the New Legislative Framework (NLF) in 2008 significantly ...

The free movement of goods, the first of the four fundamental freedoms of the internal market, is secured through the elimination of customs duties and quantitative restrictions, and the prohibition of measures having an equivalent effect. The principles of mutual recognition, elimination of physical and technical barriers, and promotion of standardisation were added in order to continue the completion of the internal market. The adoption of the New Legislative Framework (NLF) in 2008 significantly strengthened product marketing rules, the free movement of goods, the EU’s market surveillance system and the CE mark. The mutual recognition principle was also consolidated, and applies to a wide range of products not covered by EU harmonisation.

The mutual recognition of diplomas

01-11-2017

The freedom of establishment and the freedom to provide services are cornerstones of the single market, enabling the mobility of businesses and professionals throughout the EU. Implementing these freedoms supposes the overall recognition of nationally delivered diplomas and qualifications. Different measures for their harmonisation and mutual recognition have been adopted, and further legislation on the subject is under way.

The freedom of establishment and the freedom to provide services are cornerstones of the single market, enabling the mobility of businesses and professionals throughout the EU. Implementing these freedoms supposes the overall recognition of nationally delivered diplomas and qualifications. Different measures for their harmonisation and mutual recognition have been adopted, and further legislation on the subject is under way.

Free movement of capital

01-11-2017

The free movement of capital is not only the most recent of all Treaty freedoms, but — because of its unique third-country dimension — also the broadest. The liberalisation of capital flows progressed gradually. Since the Maastricht Treaty, all restrictions on capital movements and payments have been removed, both between Member States and with third countries. The principle has direct effect, i.e. it requires no further legislation at either EU or Member State level.

The free movement of capital is not only the most recent of all Treaty freedoms, but — because of its unique third-country dimension — also the broadest. The liberalisation of capital flows progressed gradually. Since the Maastricht Treaty, all restrictions on capital movements and payments have been removed, both between Member States and with third countries. The principle has direct effect, i.e. it requires no further legislation at either EU or Member State level.

Competition policy

01-11-2017

Articles 101 to 109 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) contain rules on competition in the internal market, prohibiting anti-competitive agreements between undertakings. Businesses with a dominant market position must not abuse their position in a way which adversely affects trade between Member States. Mergers and takeovers with an EU dimension are monitored by the European Commission (‘the Commission’) and may be prevented in certain cases. State aid to given undertakings ...

Articles 101 to 109 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) contain rules on competition in the internal market, prohibiting anti-competitive agreements between undertakings. Businesses with a dominant market position must not abuse their position in a way which adversely affects trade between Member States. Mergers and takeovers with an EU dimension are monitored by the European Commission (‘the Commission’) and may be prevented in certain cases. State aid to given undertakings or products is prohibited when it leads to distortions of competition but can be authorised in specific cases. Competition rules also apply to public undertakings, public services and services of general interest. However, exceptions may be granted where application of the rules would jeopardise the realisation of the objectives of those services.

Public procurement contracts

01-11-2017

Public authorities conclude contracts to ensure the supply of works and delivery of services. These contracts, concluded in exchange for remuneration with one or more operators, are called public contracts and represent an important part of the EU’s GDP. However, only a small percentage of public procurement contracts have been awarded to non-national undertakings. The application of the principles of the internal market to these contracts ensures better allocation of economic resources and more ...

Public authorities conclude contracts to ensure the supply of works and delivery of services. These contracts, concluded in exchange for remuneration with one or more operators, are called public contracts and represent an important part of the EU’s GDP. However, only a small percentage of public procurement contracts have been awarded to non-national undertakings. The application of the principles of the internal market to these contracts ensures better allocation of economic resources and more rational use of public funds. A new public procurement package was adopted in 2014 by Parliament and the Council with the aim of simplifying procedures and making them more flexible in order to encourage access to public procurement for SMEs, and to ensure that greater consideration is given to social and environmental criteria.

European System of Financial Supervision (ESFS)

01-11-2017

The European System of Financial Supervision (ESFS) is a multi-layered system of micro- and macro-prudential authorities, which includes the European Systemic Risk Board, the three European Supervisory Authorities and the national supervisors. The ESFS aims at ensuring consistent and coherent financial supervision in the EU. This supervisory system is undergoing changes further to the introduction of the Banking Union and the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the EU.

The European System of Financial Supervision (ESFS) is a multi-layered system of micro- and macro-prudential authorities, which includes the European Systemic Risk Board, the three European Supervisory Authorities and the national supervisors. The ESFS aims at ensuring consistent and coherent financial supervision in the EU. This supervisory system is undergoing changes further to the introduction of the Banking Union and the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the EU.

Financial services: main legislation

01-11-2017

Financial services regulation and supervision in the EU has received great attention during the global financial crisis. In the post-crisis period, the EU undertook a major overhaul of its financial services policy in order to bring back stability and confidence in the financial system. More than 40 new measures have been proposed in recent years, driven by initiatives such as the Banking Union and Capital Markets Union. The reform of the financial sector is still an ongoing process.

Financial services regulation and supervision in the EU has received great attention during the global financial crisis. In the post-crisis period, the EU undertook a major overhaul of its financial services policy in order to bring back stability and confidence in the financial system. More than 40 new measures have been proposed in recent years, driven by initiatives such as the Banking Union and Capital Markets Union. The reform of the financial sector is still an ongoing process.

History of economic and monetary union

01-11-2017

Economic and monetary union (EMU) is the result of progressive economic integration in the EU. It is an expansion of the EU single market, with common product regulations and free movement of goods, capital, labour and services. A common currency, the euro, has been introduced in the eurozone, which currently comprises 19 EU Member States. All 28 EU Member States — with the exception of the UK and Denmark — must adopt the euro after a minimum of two years’ participation in ERM II and fulfilment of ...

Economic and monetary union (EMU) is the result of progressive economic integration in the EU. It is an expansion of the EU single market, with common product regulations and free movement of goods, capital, labour and services. A common currency, the euro, has been introduced in the eurozone, which currently comprises 19 EU Member States. All 28 EU Member States — with the exception of the UK and Denmark — must adopt the euro after a minimum of two years’ participation in ERM II and fulfilment of the convergence criteria. A single monetary policy is set by the European Central Bank (ECB) and is complemented by harmonised fiscal and coordinated economic policies. Within EMU there is no single institution responsible for economic policy. Instead, the responsibility is divided between Member States and various EU institutions.

Upcoming events

23-11-2017
Global trends to 2030: The making of a new geopolitical order?
Other event -
ESPAS
23-11-2017
Implementation of Young Farmers' Policies after the 2013 CAP Reform
Hearing -
AGRI
27-11-2017
Public Hearing on Cybersecurity Act
Hearing -
ITRE

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