22

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Policy area
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Keyword
Date

Jewish communities in the European Union

21-01-2019

Europe's Jewish population has been diminishing in recent decades, and a growing number of anti-Semitic acts and anti-Jewish violence have been occurring in recent years in the EU. In defence of its values, including respect for minorities, the EU undertakes and funds actions to counter anti-Semitism. This is a further updated version of an 'at a glance' note published in January 2018.

Europe's Jewish population has been diminishing in recent decades, and a growing number of anti-Semitic acts and anti-Jewish violence have been occurring in recent years in the EU. In defence of its values, including respect for minorities, the EU undertakes and funds actions to counter anti-Semitism. This is a further updated version of an 'at a glance' note published in January 2018.

Non-formal learning: Access and validation

10-12-2018

Learning happens in different contexts, over the course of a lifetime, following various possible educational paths, as shown in Figure 1. In adult life, learning ranges from programmes that impart basic skills, learning groups engaged in raising awareness on various issues, mature students at university, open and distance learning, on-the-job training, courses that combine theory with practice, and classes or other learning activities taken in pursuit of a special interest. This infographic explains ...

Learning happens in different contexts, over the course of a lifetime, following various possible educational paths, as shown in Figure 1. In adult life, learning ranges from programmes that impart basic skills, learning groups engaged in raising awareness on various issues, mature students at university, open and distance learning, on-the-job training, courses that combine theory with practice, and classes or other learning activities taken in pursuit of a special interest. This infographic explains the modalities that non-formal learning takes across Member States.

Erasmus 2021-2027

15-11-2018

The focus of the new Erasmus programme 2021-2027 is on inclusiveness and on better reach of young people with fewer opportunities. The priorities and action steps of the new programme are described in the impact assessment in detail, however, no description is given on the actual operation of these actions in practice.

The focus of the new Erasmus programme 2021-2027 is on inclusiveness and on better reach of young people with fewer opportunities. The priorities and action steps of the new programme are described in the impact assessment in detail, however, no description is given on the actual operation of these actions in practice.

Erasmus 2021-2027: The Union programme for education, training, youth and sport

06-11-2018

The Erasmus 2021-2027 proposal was published on 30 May 2018. Establishing a new programme would ensure the continuation of the Erasmus+ funding programme for education, training, youth and sport. The Commission claims its proposal would double the funds available to €30 000 million in current prices, from €14 712 million dedicated to Erasmus+. The proposal would also triple the number of participants. While Erasmus+ offered mobility opportunities to more than 4 million people, the new programming ...

The Erasmus 2021-2027 proposal was published on 30 May 2018. Establishing a new programme would ensure the continuation of the Erasmus+ funding programme for education, training, youth and sport. The Commission claims its proposal would double the funds available to €30 000 million in current prices, from €14 712 million dedicated to Erasmus+. The proposal would also triple the number of participants. While Erasmus+ offered mobility opportunities to more than 4 million people, the new programming period aims to reach up to 12 million participants. The new proposal also aims at greater simplification for end-users, incorporates sports in the main structure of the programme, expands the use of digitalisation, supports new areas of knowledge and introduces Discover EU, a new mobility initiative. Stakeholders agreed that the current programme is highly beneficial but lessons need to be learnt to help the next generation programme run more efficiently and effectively.

Investment in infrastructure in the EU: Gaps, challenges, and opportunities

03-10-2018

Public infrastructure consists of the basic physical assets and structures that support economic activity. Investment in such assets is markedly different from other types of capital expenditure, due to the heavy involvement of the public sector and the significant positive spill-over that it generates throughout the economy. Yet the same characteristics that underlie infrastructure investment can also result in its under-provision over time, due to factors such as fiscal constraints. In the European ...

Public infrastructure consists of the basic physical assets and structures that support economic activity. Investment in such assets is markedly different from other types of capital expenditure, due to the heavy involvement of the public sector and the significant positive spill-over that it generates throughout the economy. Yet the same characteristics that underlie infrastructure investment can also result in its under-provision over time, due to factors such as fiscal constraints. In the European Union (EU), following a period of sustained growth, investment in infrastructure has been declining since 2009. Despite the gradual easing of this negative trend from 2015, investment rates remain below pre-crisis levels. This has given rise to a lively debate over the emergence of an investment gap and its implications for the EU's economic recovery and competitiveness. This is because investment in infrastructure has the potential not only to boost aggregate demand in the short term, but also to bring important benefits over the longer term by broadening the productive capacity of the economy as a whole. Estimates for the EU indicate that plummeting investment is below the levels needed. European Investment Bank (EIB) estimates suggest that economic infrastructure investment needs for energy, transport, water and sanitation, and telecoms are as much as €688 billion per year. Additional estimates for social infrastructure suggest that the investment gap for health, education and social housing is at €142 billion per year. The mobilisation of resources required is therefore significant. In due recognition of the emerging needs, the current and previous multiannual financial frameworks put emphasis on the expansion of programmes and initiatives where infrastructure plays a prominent role, both directly, as the primary targeted sector, and indirectly through broader interventions covering a range of sectors.

Research for CULT Committee - ESIF and culture, education, youth & sport – the use of European Structural and Investment Funds in policy areas of the Committee on Culture & Education

15-05-2018

The study examines the nature and extent of ESIF funding for education and training, culture, sport and youth, including the legal base for such support. Much activity in these areas is hidden in official data, under other headings, but all of the areas are already making a significant contribution to economic and social development. The study concludes with a recommendation that there be greater recognition in the future of the human contribution of these areas to cohesion policy.

The study examines the nature and extent of ESIF funding for education and training, culture, sport and youth, including the legal base for such support. Much activity in these areas is hidden in official data, under other headings, but all of the areas are already making a significant contribution to economic and social development. The study concludes with a recommendation that there be greater recognition in the future of the human contribution of these areas to cohesion policy.

External author

The Centre for Strategy & Evaluation Services LLP (CSES): Mike Coyne, Malin Carlberg, Caroline Chandler, Eugenie Lale-Demoz

Research for CULT Committee - Child Safety Online: Definition of the Problem

07-02-2018

This briefing paper addresses the definition and scope of children’s online safety as a policy issue and process. The paper draws on evidence of risks that children may encounter in the course of their use of the Internet. This is one of three briefing papers requested by the CULT Committee to assist in its assessment of the requirements to ensure adequate support for protection of minors and children’s wellbeing in the digital age.

This briefing paper addresses the definition and scope of children’s online safety as a policy issue and process. The paper draws on evidence of risks that children may encounter in the course of their use of the Internet. This is one of three briefing papers requested by the CULT Committee to assist in its assessment of the requirements to ensure adequate support for protection of minors and children’s wellbeing in the digital age.

External author

Brian O’Neill

Research for CULT Committee - Recommendations for EU policy developments on the protection of minors in the digital age

07-02-2018

This briefing paper provides information, analysis and recommendations regarding future EU policy developments on the protection of minors in the digital age to support the CULT Committee’s deliberations. Focusing on developments since 2012, it identifies recent policy developments at EU level, evaluates existing EU initiatives and instruments, and recommends further action by the European Commission and other stakeholders.

This briefing paper provides information, analysis and recommendations regarding future EU policy developments on the protection of minors in the digital age to support the CULT Committee’s deliberations. Focusing on developments since 2012, it identifies recent policy developments at EU level, evaluates existing EU initiatives and instruments, and recommends further action by the European Commission and other stakeholders.

External author

London School of Economics and Political Science: Sonia Livingstone, Damian Tambini and Nikola Belakova

Radicalisation and violent extremism – focus on women: How women become radicalised, and how to empower them to prevent radicalisation

21-12-2017

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens' Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality, focuses on Islamist radicalisation and violent extremism in the EU and has two aims: 1) to explore and assess the question of women’s radicalisation and their involvement in violent extremism in the EU as well as to look into the mechanisms in place to prevent women and girls from radicalisation and propose further ...

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens' Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality, focuses on Islamist radicalisation and violent extremism in the EU and has two aims: 1) to explore and assess the question of women’s radicalisation and their involvement in violent extremism in the EU as well as to look into the mechanisms in place to prevent women and girls from radicalisation and propose further actions; and 2) to identify the potential of women in preventing radicalisation, in particular by looking into women’s current role in counter-radicalisation strategies and to explore potential gendered approaches and best practices to counter-radicalisation.

External author

Seran DE LEEDE Renate HAUPFLEISCH Katja KOROLKOVA Monika NATTER With contributions by: Claudia CARVALHO (Case study Spain) Hadiya MASIEH (Case study United Kingdom)

Empowering Africa's youth: The new focus of EU-Africa cooperation

14-11-2017

Africa is the world's youngest continent. With a rapidly growing population, Africa is forecast to make up for much of the population decline in other parts of the world in the coming decades. As a result, by 2050, one in four working-age persons in the world could be African. Today, over 60 % of Africans are under the age of 25. This demographic dynamism brings enormous challenges and opportunities. If well managed, it could drive an African economic miracle, which will shape the history of the ...

Africa is the world's youngest continent. With a rapidly growing population, Africa is forecast to make up for much of the population decline in other parts of the world in the coming decades. As a result, by 2050, one in four working-age persons in the world could be African. Today, over 60 % of Africans are under the age of 25. This demographic dynamism brings enormous challenges and opportunities. If well managed, it could drive an African economic miracle, which will shape the history of the 21st century. On the other hand, such unprecedented demographic growth does not come without specific challenges: the numerous children and young people must have their educational and health needs met, and enough jobs have to be created for the large cohorts entering the labour market every year. Large generations of young people who are politically excluded and deprived of economic opportunities can be an aggravating factor in conflicts, and can be prone to political and religious radicalisation. Instability and increasing poverty would also lead to mass migration to Europe and elsewhere. Europe cannot ignore the rising challenges and opportunities at its southern borders. Positive or negative spill-overs to Europe will be inevitable. It is therefore in the EU's own interest to help the continent steer the demographic boom towards an economic boom, providing young people with opportunities, alleviating poverty and bringing lasting peace and stability. As the EU prepares to redefine its cooperation with Africa, the issue of youth is thus inescapable. The most urgent challenge for the EU is to channel foreign investment and development efforts towards Africa's youngest populations, which are more than ever located in its most fragile states.

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