3

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Policy area
Author
Date

Early childhood education and care in family-friendly policies

04-05-2016

Early childhood education and care (ECEC) services for children – from birth to compulsory primary school age – form an essential part of policies for work-life balance and for better social cohesion. A policy mix of flexible labour market arrangements, generous leave policies and quality ECEC services allows choices for parents, and at the same time supports the healthy development of their children. Member States are increasingly establishing well-functioning, efficient systems. Investing in early-years ...

Early childhood education and care (ECEC) services for children – from birth to compulsory primary school age – form an essential part of policies for work-life balance and for better social cohesion. A policy mix of flexible labour market arrangements, generous leave policies and quality ECEC services allows choices for parents, and at the same time supports the healthy development of their children. Member States are increasingly establishing well-functioning, efficient systems. Investing in early-years services brings the greatest returns, and is generally more successful than later remedial action. Until recently, ECEC was mainly considered as a vehicle for helping parents, primarily women, to (re)integrate into the labour market across the EU. Lately, there has been a growing awareness about its multiple benefits for children's personal development and social integration, including mitigating inequalities and preparing for later employability. This is particularly the case for disadvantaged children. The quality of life of young children is an important element in building smart, inclusive and productive societies. Quality accessible ECEC is an indispensable part of ensuring a quality childhood and building a resilient society.

Cohesion in Mountainous Regions of the EU

15-02-2016

Their specific potentials and opportunities of mountain areas need to be considered as much as their challenges. Mountain areas are too diverse to elaborate an integrated European strategy. However, a framework for development strategies in mountain areas can be developed, taking into account the specific challenges and importance of mountain farming, the high levels of biodiversity in mountain areas, and their specific exposure to climate change. Cohesion policy could use such a framework to better ...

Their specific potentials and opportunities of mountain areas need to be considered as much as their challenges. Mountain areas are too diverse to elaborate an integrated European strategy. However, a framework for development strategies in mountain areas can be developed, taking into account the specific challenges and importance of mountain farming, the high levels of biodiversity in mountain areas, and their specific exposure to climate change. Cohesion policy could use such a framework to better address the demographic challenges of many mountain areas and to promote their economic and social development more efficiently with an enhanced sustainable development perspective. This also presupposes more flexible multi-level governance arrangements.

External author

Erik Gløersen, Martin F. Price, Andreja Borec, Thomas Dax and Benito Giordano

The European Year for Development: Demography and Migration

27-08-2015

If current trends continue, the world will have 9.7 billion inhabitants in 2050, but population growth will be unevenly distributed. The 1994 Cairo International Conference on Population and Development was a milestone that focused on the well-being of individuals, rather than numerical targets. There has been progress promoting human rights, education, gender equality, sexual and reproductive health, and reproductive rights, but rapid urbanisation and climate change represent new challenges. The ...

If current trends continue, the world will have 9.7 billion inhabitants in 2050, but population growth will be unevenly distributed. The 1994 Cairo International Conference on Population and Development was a milestone that focused on the well-being of individuals, rather than numerical targets. There has been progress promoting human rights, education, gender equality, sexual and reproductive health, and reproductive rights, but rapid urbanisation and climate change represent new challenges. The international community has recognised the need to promote regular, safe and orderly international migration to harness the potential benefits of migration. Contrary to widespread views, emigration rates rise with economic development until countries reach an upper middle income status. The role migration plays in spurring development should be more widely recognised. Human mobility will be integrated in the post-2015 development agenda, and the Sustainable Development Goals will include migrationrelated targets. The EU is addressing the migration-development nexus in its Global Approach to Migration and Mobility, which is implemented through policy dialogues and cooperation projects in third countries. The European Parliament has insisted that the rights of migrants – particularly women – be part of the post-2015 agenda.

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