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Access to legal remedies for victims of corporate human rights abuses in third countries

01-02-2019

European-based multinational corporations can cause or be complicit in human rights abuses in third countries. Victims of corporate human rights abuses frequently face many hurdles when attempting to hold corporations to account in their own country. Against this backdrop, judicial mechanisms have increasingly been relied on to bring legal proceedings in the home States of the corporations. This study attempts to map out all relevant cases (35 in total) filed in Member States of the European Union ...

European-based multinational corporations can cause or be complicit in human rights abuses in third countries. Victims of corporate human rights abuses frequently face many hurdles when attempting to hold corporations to account in their own country. Against this backdrop, judicial mechanisms have increasingly been relied on to bring legal proceedings in the home States of the corporations. This study attempts to map out all relevant cases (35 in total) filed in Member States of the European Union on the basis of alleged corporate human rights abuses in third countries. It also provides an in-depth analysis of 12 cases and identifies various obstacles (legal, procedural and practical) faced by claimants in accessing legal remedy. On the basis of these findings, it makes a number of recommendations to the EU institutions in order to improve access to legal remedies in the EU for victims of human rights abuses by European based companies in third countries.

External author

Dr. Axel Marx, Dr. Claire Bright, Prof. Dr. Jan Wouters, Ms. Nina Pineau, Mr. Brecht Lein, Mr. Torbjörn Schiebe, Ms. Johanna Wagner, Ms. Evelien Wauter

A Ten-Year-Long “EU Mediation Paradox”- When an EU Directive Needs To Be More …Directive

21-11-2018

Ten years since its adoption, the EU Mediation Directive remains very far from reaching its stated goals. This briefing summarises the main achievements and failures in the implementation at national level. In addition, it assesses the conclusions of previous research and of the European Parliament's resolution on the implmentation of the Mediation Directive.

Ten years since its adoption, the EU Mediation Directive remains very far from reaching its stated goals. This briefing summarises the main achievements and failures in the implementation at national level. In addition, it assesses the conclusions of previous research and of the European Parliament's resolution on the implmentation of the Mediation Directive.

External author

Giuseppe De Palo, Professor of Alternative Dispute Resolution Law and Practice at Mitchell Hamline School of Law, St Paul, U.S.A

Modernising judicial cooperation in civil and commercial matters: Implementation Appraisal

15-05-2018

The regulation on the service of documents and the regulation on taking of evidence are key instruments in the facilitation of cross-border cooperation between national civil courts. They have contributed to the effectiveness of cross-border litigation before civil and commercial courts by making civil proceedings in cross-border cases simpler, faster and cheaper. However, digitalisation and the use of electronic means of communication could boost their efficiency. This is why the European Commission ...

The regulation on the service of documents and the regulation on taking of evidence are key instruments in the facilitation of cross-border cooperation between national civil courts. They have contributed to the effectiveness of cross-border litigation before civil and commercial courts by making civil proceedings in cross-border cases simpler, faster and cheaper. However, digitalisation and the use of electronic means of communication could boost their efficiency. This is why the European Commission is aiming to align the two instruments with the e-government objectives of the digital single market strategy. The Commission's review process has also brought to light some other shortcomings in the application of the two regulations, such as uncertainties regarding their scope and issues relating to the protection of the rights of the defence. Current disparities in the procedural laws of the Member States lead to legal uncertainties in the application of the regulations. The Commission is seeking ways to modernise judicial cooperation in civil and commercial matters, and in particular Regulations 1393/2007/EC and 1206/2001/EC. To that end, it is currently undertaking a combined evaluation and impact assessment for both regulations at once.

THE HAGUE CONFERENCE ON PRIVATE INTERNATIONAL LAW “JUDGMENTS CONVENTION”

16-04-2018

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee, provides an assessment of the ongoing work of the Hague Conference on the Judgments Convention. The analysis focuses on the November 2017 Draft Convention, its interplay with international and Union instruments in the field, as well as its potential future impact on the regulation of civil and commercial cross-border disputes.

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee, provides an assessment of the ongoing work of the Hague Conference on the Judgments Convention. The analysis focuses on the November 2017 Draft Convention, its interplay with international and Union instruments in the field, as well as its potential future impact on the regulation of civil and commercial cross-border disputes.

External author

Pedro A. DE MIGUEL ASENSIO (coord.), Professor, Complutense University of Madrid, Spain Gilles CUNIBERTI, Professor, University of Luxembourg Pietro FRANZINA, Professor, University of Ferrara, Italy Christian HEINZE, Professor, Leibniz University of Hannover, Germany Marta REQUEJO ISIDRO, Senior Research Fellow, Max Planck Institute Luxembourg

Judicial cooperation in civil matters

01-03-2018

Free movement of goods, services, capital and people across borders is constantly on the increase. In civil matters having cross-border implications, the European Union is developing judicial cooperation, building bridges between the different legal systems. Its main objectives are legal certainty and easy and effective access to justice, implying identification of the competent jurisdiction, clear designation of the applicable law and speedy and effective recognition and enforcement procedures.

Free movement of goods, services, capital and people across borders is constantly on the increase. In civil matters having cross-border implications, the European Union is developing judicial cooperation, building bridges between the different legal systems. Its main objectives are legal certainty and easy and effective access to justice, implying identification of the competent jurisdiction, clear designation of the applicable law and speedy and effective recognition and enforcement procedures.