6

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Policy area
Author
Date

Galileo Satellite Navigation System

25-10-2018

This study explains the background necessary for understanding of the Global Satellite Navigation System (GNSS) working principles and the importance of GNSS in our daily life and work. It highlights the specific socio-economic and strategic advantages enabled by the European satellite navigation system ‘Galileo’. It also identifies some of the gaps and challenges towards Galileo’s final operational capability expected in 2021. The study proposes different policy options in order to maximise the ...

This study explains the background necessary for understanding of the Global Satellite Navigation System (GNSS) working principles and the importance of GNSS in our daily life and work. It highlights the specific socio-economic and strategic advantages enabled by the European satellite navigation system ‘Galileo’. It also identifies some of the gaps and challenges towards Galileo’s final operational capability expected in 2021. The study proposes different policy options in order to maximise the impact of the European satellite navigation system in the near future and in the long term.

External author

EPRS, DG

Galileo and EGNOS

24-01-2018

Galileo and the European geostationary navigation overlay service (EGNOS) are two satellite navigation systems under civil control. Galileo is an autonomous global navigation satellite system consisting of a constellation of satellites and a global network of ground stations. EGNOS is a regional satellite navigation system that monitors, corrects and improves the accuracy of open signals emitted by existing global satellite navigation systems (GPS, Glonass). Galileo and EGNOS are infrastructures ...

Galileo and the European geostationary navigation overlay service (EGNOS) are two satellite navigation systems under civil control. Galileo is an autonomous global navigation satellite system consisting of a constellation of satellites and a global network of ground stations. EGNOS is a regional satellite navigation system that monitors, corrects and improves the accuracy of open signals emitted by existing global satellite navigation systems (GPS, Glonass). Galileo and EGNOS are infrastructures owned by the European Union, which were conceived in close cooperation with the European Space Agency. They guarantee Europe independent access to a reliable positioning satellite signal, allowing more accuracy than that offered by other accessible systems.

Galileo: Overcoming obstacles - History of EU global navigation satellite systems

06-04-2017

Galileo, the long-awaited European global navigation satellite systems, is at a turning point in its history: it reached initial operational capacity in December 2016 and is expected to be fully operational for 2021. This autonomous European civilian tool, which can be used anywhere on earth, transmits positioning and timing data from space for use on the ground to determine a user's location. Alongside it, the European geostationary navigation overlay system (EGNOS), which improves the accuracy ...

Galileo, the long-awaited European global navigation satellite systems, is at a turning point in its history: it reached initial operational capacity in December 2016 and is expected to be fully operational for 2021. This autonomous European civilian tool, which can be used anywhere on earth, transmits positioning and timing data from space for use on the ground to determine a user's location. Alongside it, the European geostationary navigation overlay system (EGNOS), which improves the accuracy and integrity of the American global positioning system (GPS) over EU territory, became fully operational in 2011. Despite decades of delays, difficulties and additional costs, Galileo and EGNOS have benefited from the continuous support of all EU institutions, and the European Union (EU) decided to provide the funding needed to complete both programmes. Galileo and EGNOS became the first infrastructure to be owned by the EU. Delays and cost over-runs can be explained through political, technical, industrial and security issues. It is estimated that by 2020, the EU and European Space Agency will have invested more than €13 billion in these programmes. This public investment, although much larger than that initially planned, matches the cost of similar programmes such as GPS, and is justified by the need for the European Union to have strategic autonomy in the field. The market uptake of the services and data provided by EGNOS and Galileo is a key priority of the European space strategy adopted in October 2016.

European space policy: Historical perspective, specific aspects and key challenges

30-01-2017

Space has been a cooperative endeavour in Europe for over 50 years. The first collaborative structures between the Member States in the 1960s led to the establishment of the European Space Agency (ESA) in 1975. The European Union began to be involved in the field in the 1990s, especially through the design of EU space programmes – Galileo for satellite navigation and Copernicus for earth observation – implemented in cooperation with ESA. European space policy is defined and implemented by the EU, ...

Space has been a cooperative endeavour in Europe for over 50 years. The first collaborative structures between the Member States in the 1960s led to the establishment of the European Space Agency (ESA) in 1975. The European Union began to be involved in the field in the 1990s, especially through the design of EU space programmes – Galileo for satellite navigation and Copernicus for earth observation – implemented in cooperation with ESA. European space policy is defined and implemented by the EU, ESA and their member states. This diversity offers some flexibility, but also creates fragmentation, leading to inefficiency in areas such as the implementation of EU programmes or the development of international relations. New developments, including the role of private actors in the field and the growing importance of security and defence aspects also challenge current European space policy governance.

Space, Sovereignty and European Security - Building European Capabilities in an Advanced Institutional Framework

29-01-2014

The study aims to offer a comprehensive analysis of the role of space-based capabilities in supporting the security and defence policies of the European Union and of its Member States. Moving from the description of the current and future space-based systems developed at the national, intergovernmental and European level, the study tries in first place to point out the contribution of these assets to the security initiatives undertaken in Europe. Second, it describes the roles of the actors and the ...

The study aims to offer a comprehensive analysis of the role of space-based capabilities in supporting the security and defence policies of the European Union and of its Member States. Moving from the description of the current and future space-based systems developed at the national, intergovernmental and European level, the study tries in first place to point out the contribution of these assets to the security initiatives undertaken in Europe. Second, it describes the roles of the actors and the functioning of the institutional framework through which these capabilities are developed and exploited for Europe's security purposes. Finally, it provides options regarding the development of space capabilities for European security which could be implemented under the current treaties and within the scope of the forthcoming Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) of the Union.

External author

Anna C. VECLANI (Istituto Affari Internazionali - IAI, ITALY), Nicolò SARTORI (Istituto Affari Internazionali - IAI, ITALY), Emiliano Jr. BATTISTI (Istituto Affari Internazionali - IAI, ITALY), Jean Pierre DARNIS (Scientific Supervisor, Istituto Affari Internazionali - IAI, ITALY) and Elena CESCA (Research Support, Istituto Affari Internazionali - IAI, ITALY)

The Galileo programme

27-10-2010

Galileo, a European constellation of satellites currently under construction, has been accumulating delays and cost overruns since its inception in 1999. Galileo was initially planned to be operational in 2008, but as of 2010 only two experimental satellites have been put into orbit. As regards funding, the programme was initially planned to be partially financed by the private sector. However, negotiations failed in 2007 and in 2008 the programme became financed entirely by the EU budget.

Galileo, a European constellation of satellites currently under construction, has been accumulating delays and cost overruns since its inception in 1999. Galileo was initially planned to be operational in 2008, but as of 2010 only two experimental satellites have been put into orbit. As regards funding, the programme was initially planned to be partially financed by the private sector. However, negotiations failed in 2007 and in 2008 the programme became financed entirely by the EU budget.

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