457

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Word(s)
Publication type
Author
Keyword
Date

Motor vehicles: new approval and market surveillance rules

21-02-2018

The automotive industry is a major player in the European economy, accounting for 6.4% of gross domestic product and 2.3 million jobs in the European Union (EU). In September 2015, the Volkswagen (VW) case highlighted weaknesses in the implementation of type-approval rules for motor vehicles in the European Union, in particular as regards standards on emissions of air pollutants and carbon dioxide. In 2016, as part of preparations from previous years but also in response to the VW case, the European ...

The automotive industry is a major player in the European economy, accounting for 6.4% of gross domestic product and 2.3 million jobs in the European Union (EU). In September 2015, the Volkswagen (VW) case highlighted weaknesses in the implementation of type-approval rules for motor vehicles in the European Union, in particular as regards standards on emissions of air pollutants and carbon dioxide. In 2016, as part of preparations from previous years but also in response to the VW case, the European Commission proposed strengthening the type-approval system for motor vehicles. Its goal is to ensure effective enforcement of rules (including through market surveillance), to strengthen the quality and independence of technical tests and to introduce EU oversight on the type-approval process.

Tax transparency for intermediaries

21-02-2018

The situations highlighted by the 'Panama papers' and 'Paradise papers', among others leaks show how certain intermediaries and other providers of tax advice appear to have facilitated companies and individuals in avoiding taxation, often through complex cross-border schemes involving routing assets to, or through, offshore entities. Among the tools to fight tax avoidance and aggressive tax planning are established mechanisms for disclosure of tax information and publication of tax-relevant information ...

The situations highlighted by the 'Panama papers' and 'Paradise papers', among others leaks show how certain intermediaries and other providers of tax advice appear to have facilitated companies and individuals in avoiding taxation, often through complex cross-border schemes involving routing assets to, or through, offshore entities. Among the tools to fight tax avoidance and aggressive tax planning are established mechanisms for disclosure of tax information and publication of tax-relevant information by companies. In June 2017, the Commission adopted a proposal aimed at ensuring early information on such situations, by setting an obligation to report cross-border arrangements designed by tax intermediaries or taxpayers and by including the information collected in the automatic exchange of information between tax authorities within the European Union. The proposal responds to calls made by both the European Parliament and the Council. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

A new directive on work-life balance

20-02-2018

Despite significant progress for some social groups in the area of work-life balance, there has been a general trend of decline since 2011, and progress amongst Member States has been uneven. This proposed directive (complemented with non-legislative measures) should lead to the repeal of the existing Framework Agreement on Parental Leave, made binding by Council Directive 2010/18/EU (the Parental Leave Directive). The new directive contains proposals for paternity, parental and carers' leave. Stakeholders ...

Despite significant progress for some social groups in the area of work-life balance, there has been a general trend of decline since 2011, and progress amongst Member States has been uneven. This proposed directive (complemented with non-legislative measures) should lead to the repeal of the existing Framework Agreement on Parental Leave, made binding by Council Directive 2010/18/EU (the Parental Leave Directive). The new directive contains proposals for paternity, parental and carers' leave. Stakeholders have been divided over the level of ambition of the proposed measures. Both EU advisory committees have issued opinions and some national parliaments have expressed their reasoned and other opinions. The Council of the EU issued a progress report in November 2017. The European Parliament's Employment and Social Affairs Committee (EMPL) is expected to start consideration of its draft report on the proposed directive in spring 2018.

Contracts for the supply of digital content and digital services

19-02-2018

On 21 November 2017, the European Parliament's Internal Market and Consumer Committee (IMCO) and Legal Affairs Committee (JURI) adopted their joint report on the European Commission's proposal for a directive regulating the private-law aspects of contracts for the supply of digital content and digital services in the internal market. The Council of the EU agreed on a general approach in June 2017. Trilogue meetings began on 5 December 2017 and are still on-going. The main changes proposed by the ...

On 21 November 2017, the European Parliament's Internal Market and Consumer Committee (IMCO) and Legal Affairs Committee (JURI) adopted their joint report on the European Commission's proposal for a directive regulating the private-law aspects of contracts for the supply of digital content and digital services in the internal market. The Council of the EU agreed on a general approach in June 2017. Trilogue meetings began on 5 December 2017 and are still on-going. The main changes proposed by the joint report of the two Parliament committees are concerned with the duration of legal guarantees for digital content and services, liability for hidden defects and the short-term right to reject defective digital content. An issue which is still being discussed is the relationship between the directive and EU public law rules on the protection of personal data. Fourth edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. To view previous editions of this briefing, please see: PE 608.748 (October 2017).

The Exception for Text and Data Mining (TDM) in the Proposed Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market - Technical Aspects

15-02-2018

In an increasingly data-driven and information-rich socio-economic context, the potential of predictive text and data mining (TDM, sometimes also referred to as text and data analysis) lies in particular in facilitating the processing, recombining, and extraction of further knowledge from large amounts of data and text, thus allowing the identification of patterns and associations between seemingly unrelated pieces of information. To place things in context, according to an IBM marketing study, ...

In an increasingly data-driven and information-rich socio-economic context, the potential of predictive text and data mining (TDM, sometimes also referred to as text and data analysis) lies in particular in facilitating the processing, recombining, and extraction of further knowledge from large amounts of data and text, thus allowing the identification of patterns and associations between seemingly unrelated pieces of information. To place things in context, according to an IBM marketing study, 90 percent of the data in the world today has been created in the last two years alone. Every day, 2.5 quintillion bytes of data are created, and it is expected that such growth rate will continue at an even faster pace in the future. In this sense, the analogy made with the physical universe appears apt: it is expected that by 2020 the digital universe – which consists of data created and copied annually and is doubling in size every two years – will contain nearly as many digital bits as there are stars in the universe.

External author

Rosati Eleonora

International Agreements in Progress: EU-Vietnam Free Trade Agreement

14-02-2018

The free trade agreement (FTA) with Vietnam has been described as the most ambitious deal of its type ever concluded between the EU and a developing country. Not only will it eliminate over 99 % of customs duties on goods, it will also open up Vietnamese services markets to EU companies and strengthen protection of EU investments in the country. According to European Commission figures, the FTA could boost Vietnam's booming economy by as much as 15 % of GDP, with Vietnamese exports to Europe growing ...

The free trade agreement (FTA) with Vietnam has been described as the most ambitious deal of its type ever concluded between the EU and a developing country. Not only will it eliminate over 99 % of customs duties on goods, it will also open up Vietnamese services markets to EU companies and strengthen protection of EU investments in the country. According to European Commission figures, the FTA could boost Vietnam's booming economy by as much as 15 % of GDP, with Vietnamese exports to Europe growing by over one third. For the EU, the agreement is an important stepping stone to a wider EU-south-east Asia trade deal. Despite the obvious economic benefits of the FTA for Vietnam, some of its more vulnerable manufacturing sectors may suffer from competition with the EU. NGOs have also criticised the EU for pursuing closer ties with a politically repressive regime known for its human rights abuses, although the deal includes some safeguards against negative outcomes. Although the content of the FTA was already agreed in 2015, ratification has been delayed by a 2017 opinion of the European Court of Justice. The Court argued that some aspects of the EU-Singapore FTA, which is similar to the Vietnam FTA, are 'mixed competences', meaning that the FTA as it stands will have to be ratified not only by the EU but also by the 28 Member States. The Commission and Council are now considering whether to modify the agreement so that parts of it can be ratified more speedily by the EU alone. Second edition. The ‘International Agreements in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the process, from initial discussions through to ratification.

Revision of the Schengen Information System for border checks

12-02-2018

The Schengen Information System (SIS) is a large-scale information database that supports external border control and law-enforcement cooperation in the Schengen states by enabling competent authorities, such as police and border guards, to enter and consult alerts on wanted or missing persons and lost or stolen property. In view of responding more effectively to new migration and security challenges, in December 2016, the European Commission put forward a package of three legislative proposals aimed ...

The Schengen Information System (SIS) is a large-scale information database that supports external border control and law-enforcement cooperation in the Schengen states by enabling competent authorities, such as police and border guards, to enter and consult alerts on wanted or missing persons and lost or stolen property. In view of responding more effectively to new migration and security challenges, in December 2016, the European Commission put forward a package of three legislative proposals aimed at revising the legal framework of the SIS. The proposal on the establishment, operation and use of the SIS in the field of border checks provides for more effective use of fingerprints and facial images in the SIS, and imposes an obligation on the Member States to record all entry bans issued to third-country nationals who have been found staying illegally in their territory.

Use of the Schengen Information System for the return of illegally staying third-country nationals

12-02-2018

The Schengen Information System (SIS) is a large-scale information database that supports external border control and law enforcement cooperation in the Schengen states. It does so by enabling competent authorities, such as police and border guards, to enter and consult alerts on wanted or missing persons and lost or stolen property. In view of responding more effectively to new migration and security challenges, in December 2016, the European Commission put forward a package of three legislative ...

The Schengen Information System (SIS) is a large-scale information database that supports external border control and law enforcement cooperation in the Schengen states. It does so by enabling competent authorities, such as police and border guards, to enter and consult alerts on wanted or missing persons and lost or stolen property. In view of responding more effectively to new migration and security challenges, in December 2016, the European Commission put forward a package of three legislative proposals aimed at revising the legal framework of the SIS. The proposal on the use of the SIS for returning illegally staying third-country nationals aims to enhance the enforcement of the EU return policy and to reduce the incentives to irregular migration to the EU. Among other things, the proposal introduces the obligation for Member States to enter all return decisions into the SIS.

Revision of the Schengen Information System for law enforcement

12-02-2018

The Schengen Information System (SIS) is a large-scale information database that supports external border control and law enforcement cooperation in the Schengen states. It enables competent authorities, such as police and border guards, to enter and consult alerts on certain categories of wanted or missing persons and lost or stolen property. In December 2016, the European Commission adopted a package of proposals aimed at responding more effectively to new migration and security challenges. One ...

The Schengen Information System (SIS) is a large-scale information database that supports external border control and law enforcement cooperation in the Schengen states. It enables competent authorities, such as police and border guards, to enter and consult alerts on certain categories of wanted or missing persons and lost or stolen property. In December 2016, the European Commission adopted a package of proposals aimed at responding more effectively to new migration and security challenges. One of these proposals is focused on improving and extending the use of the SIS in the field of police cooperation and judicial cooperation in criminal matters. It clarifies procedures, creates new alerts and checks, extends the use of biometrics, and enlarges access for law enforcement authorities.

Strengthening market surveillance of harmonised industrial products

08-02-2018

Harmonised products represent 69 % of the overall value of industrial products in the internal market. However, a significant part of these products does not comply with harmonised EU rules. This has negative effects on the health and safety of consumers and on fair competition between businesses. To remedy the situation, the Commission proposed, on 19 December 2017, strengthening market surveillance rules for non-food products harmonised by EU legislation. The proposal for a compliance and enforcement ...

Harmonised products represent 69 % of the overall value of industrial products in the internal market. However, a significant part of these products does not comply with harmonised EU rules. This has negative effects on the health and safety of consumers and on fair competition between businesses. To remedy the situation, the Commission proposed, on 19 December 2017, strengthening market surveillance rules for non-food products harmonised by EU legislation. The proposal for a compliance and enforcement regulation would increase EU-level coordination of market surveillance, clarify the procedures for the mutual assistance mechanism, and require non-EU manufacturers to designate a natural or legal person responsible for compliance information in charge of cooperating with the EU market surveillance authorities. In the European Parliament, a rapporteur has been appointed, and the proposal will be discussed in committee.

Upcoming events

27-02-2018
Public Hearing on the Review of the European System of Financial Supervision
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ECON
27-02-2018
The UN Global Compacts on refugees and migrants and the role of Parliaments
Other event -
LIBE
27-02-2018
Better law-making: A lawyer's perspective
Other event -
EPRS

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