335

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Author
Keyword
Date

Wholesale roaming regulation: A precondition for 'roam like at home'

22-02-2017

In 2015 the Council and European Parliament agreed in Regulation 2015/2120 that on 15 June 2017 roaming charges for mobile phone use would be abolished in the EU. After that date, 'roam like at home' (RLAH) would become a reality for all Europeans. The regulation did not, however, address the wholesale roaming market, on account of the need to investigate market conditions in more depth. A review for the European Commission concluded that national wholesale roaming markets are not working well and ...

In 2015 the Council and European Parliament agreed in Regulation 2015/2120 that on 15 June 2017 roaming charges for mobile phone use would be abolished in the EU. After that date, 'roam like at home' (RLAH) would become a reality for all Europeans. The regulation did not, however, address the wholesale roaming market, on account of the need to investigate market conditions in more depth. A review for the European Commission concluded that national wholesale roaming markets are not working well and need regulatory intervention. It therefore proposed a regulation establishing the maximum level of wholesale roaming charges that telecoms operators can charge each other for calls, text messages and data, to take effect from 15 June 2017. On 29 November, Parliament's Industry Committee voted for a significant reduction in the data wholesale caps proposed by the Commission. During the third trilogue meeting on 31 January, an agreement was reached between the Parliament and the Council that lowers significantly the wholesale data caps originally proposed. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. To view earlier editions of this briefing, please see: PE 595.834, 6 December 2016.

Contracts for online and other distance sales of goods

20-02-2017

The Commission proposal for a directive on contracts for online and other distance sales of goods, part of the digital single market strategy, would partly replace the existing Consumer Sales Directive. The Parliament's rapporteur believes this would create a fragmented legal framework, and that there is a need to introduce uniform rules for both online and face-to-face consumer sales. Unlike the existing Consumer Sales Directive, the proposed Online Sale of Goods Directive would provide for maximum ...

The Commission proposal for a directive on contracts for online and other distance sales of goods, part of the digital single market strategy, would partly replace the existing Consumer Sales Directive. The Parliament's rapporteur believes this would create a fragmented legal framework, and that there is a need to introduce uniform rules for both online and face-to-face consumer sales. Unlike the existing Consumer Sales Directive, the proposed Online Sale of Goods Directive would provide for maximum harmonisation, thereby prohibiting Member States from introducing a higher level of consumer protection within the scope of the directive. The rapporteur agrees with this approach and suggests moving to maximum harmonisation for both online and offline consumer sales. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. To view previous versions of this briefing, please see: PE 577.962, 15 February 2016.

How blockchain technology could change our lives

20-02-2017

Blockchain technology is of increasing interest to citizens, businesses and legislators across the European Union. This report is aimed at providing a point of entry for those curious about blockchain technology, so as to stimulate interest and provoke discussion around its potential impact. A general introduction is followed by a closer look at eight areas in which blockchain has been described as having a substantial potential impact. For each of these, an explanation is given of how the technology ...

Blockchain technology is of increasing interest to citizens, businesses and legislators across the European Union. This report is aimed at providing a point of entry for those curious about blockchain technology, so as to stimulate interest and provoke discussion around its potential impact. A general introduction is followed by a closer look at eight areas in which blockchain has been described as having a substantial potential impact. For each of these, an explanation is given of how the technology could be developed in that particular area, the possible impacts this development might have, and what potential policy issues are to be anticipated.

Protecting and empowering EU consumers

14-02-2017

Wide-ranging consumer protection: The European system has developed over 30 years, with direct benefits for consumers in various areas of their daily lives. High standards and more choice: EU rules impose the highest safety requirements in the world, not least for toys. Lower prices: Mobile phone roaming costs have decreased by 92 % since 2007 and will be abolished in June 2017. All European travellers will then 'roam like at home'. More safety: Thanks to EU road safety laws, Europe has the lowest ...

Wide-ranging consumer protection: The European system has developed over 30 years, with direct benefits for consumers in various areas of their daily lives. High standards and more choice: EU rules impose the highest safety requirements in the world, not least for toys. Lower prices: Mobile phone roaming costs have decreased by 92 % since 2007 and will be abolished in June 2017. All European travellers will then 'roam like at home'. More safety: Thanks to EU road safety laws, Europe has the lowest accident fatality rate in the world – deaths fell by 43 % between 2001 and 2010 and again by 17 % from 2010 to 2015.

Review of the ePrivacy Directive

03-02-2017

The technological, economic and social landscape has significantly changed since the adoption of Directive 2002/58 on privacy in electronic communications. In spite of targeted amendments adopted in 2009, the current text of the directive does not entirely reflect recent evolutions in the sector and in consumers' habits. Some of the most notable changes in this respect include the entry of new types of players on the market and the widespread usage of internet-based services, such as instant messaging ...

The technological, economic and social landscape has significantly changed since the adoption of Directive 2002/58 on privacy in electronic communications. In spite of targeted amendments adopted in 2009, the current text of the directive does not entirely reflect recent evolutions in the sector and in consumers' habits. Some of the most notable changes in this respect include the entry of new types of players on the market and the widespread usage of internet-based services, such as instant messaging, with a potential impact on the effectiveness of existing ePrivacy rules. In addition, the adoption of the General Data Protection Regulation in 2016 has altered the legislative framework on data protection, possibly calling into question the relevance and continued coherence of the ePrivacy Directive with the new legislation. Evidence collected to evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, coherence, relevance and EU added value of Directive 2002/58, as well as the feedback gathered by the European Commission through targeted workshops, an online public consultation and a Eurobarometer survey, have confirmed the existence of various challenges. These were also raised during a dedicated conference organised by the European Parliament in 2015. In particular, some of the key provisions of the directive have not been fully effective in delivering the intended levels of confidentiality and protection envisaged by the legislator. This is the case of Article 5(3), for instance, on cookies and other techniques to store and access information on users' equipment, a point that was raised on various occasions also by the Members of the European Parliament. Moreover, it appears that some parts of Directive 2002/58 have become technologically obsolete or that better legal approaches have been adopted in the meantime. Finally, an analysis of the implementation of EU ePrivacy rules in the Member States pointed to various degrees of legal fragmentation, the coexistence of different levels of protection across the EU, and a complex governance structure with responsibilities for implementation and enforcement allocated to different types of authorities, at times even within the same country. Overall, this has contributed to a lack of legal certainty and clarity, and the absence of a level playing field across Europe. On the other hand, the EU added value and the overall relevance of having dedicated provisions protecting privacy and ensuring the practical application of Article 7 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, was repeatedly confirmed. Indeed, a modernisation of the current rules is a central component of the EU's digital single market strategy, and is expected to restore and increase citizens' and businesses' trust in the digital environment. On 10 January 2017, the European Commission adopted a proposal to repeal Directive 2002/58 and replace it with a regulation to address several of the issues outlined above, to simplify existing rules and to make them future-proof. The co-legislators will now have the task of finding a balance between the various conflicting positions and expectations that have emerged throughout the process leading to the directive's review.

European Commission follow-up to European Parliament requests

02-02-2017

In addition to its well-known role as a co-legislator, the European Parliament also supervises and scrutinises the work of the European Commission. The Parliament can therefore ask the Commission to take action to fulfil its role as guardian of the Treaties and to contribute to the improved functioning of the European Union and its legislation. Such requests usually take the form of resolutions. This Rolling Check-List covers the resolutions adopted by Parliament on the basis of own-initiative reports ...

In addition to its well-known role as a co-legislator, the European Parliament also supervises and scrutinises the work of the European Commission. The Parliament can therefore ask the Commission to take action to fulfil its role as guardian of the Treaties and to contribute to the improved functioning of the European Union and its legislation. Such requests usually take the form of resolutions. This Rolling Check-List covers the resolutions adopted by Parliament on the basis of own-initiative reports and legislative own-initiative reports during the current eighth legislative term up to December 2015, and the actions taken by the Commission as a result up to 31 October 2016. In total, the report covers 97 resolutions across almost all parliamentary committees. It provides a detailed overview of the Parliament's requests, and tracks the Commission's response and any further action taken. It thus offers a comprehensive scrutiny and reference tool, providing easy access to the follow-up given by the Commission to the Parliament's requests.

Consumer Protection Cooperation

31-01-2017

The Commission estimates that the detriment to consumers caused by non-compliance with basic EU consumer rules in certain cross-border online markets and also by inefficient cross-border enforcement amounts to €770 million per year. To remedy this, the Commission has presented a legislative proposal to review the existing rules on consumer protection cooperation between enforcement authorities as part of its e-commerce package in May 2016. The aim is to clarify the rules and to give more powers to ...

The Commission estimates that the detriment to consumers caused by non-compliance with basic EU consumer rules in certain cross-border online markets and also by inefficient cross-border enforcement amounts to €770 million per year. To remedy this, the Commission has presented a legislative proposal to review the existing rules on consumer protection cooperation between enforcement authorities as part of its e-commerce package in May 2016. The aim is to clarify the rules and to give more powers to national enforcement authorities, most importantly to enable them to address unlawful online practices and improve coordination among them. Stakeholders have, in general, welcomed the move to improve cooperation between enforcement authorities and the European Economic and Social Committee in its opinion of 19 October 2016 supported the proposal. The Maltese Council Presidency aims to reach a general approach in February 2017, when the Parliament’s IMCO committee is also expected to consider amendments to the draft report, presented by the rapporteur on 30 November 2016. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Reforming e-Communications Services: a Critical Assessment

31-01-2017

This report analyses the proposed reform of the e-communications regulatory framework presented by the European Commission in September 2016. While many of the proposed changes appear meaningful, the report argues that overall the proposal does not entirely reflect the lessons learned from the past two decades of e-communications regulation in Europe, and ends up being at once too conservative (i.e. incremental with respect to legacy rules); fragile, since its effectiveness crucially depends on governance ...

This report analyses the proposed reform of the e-communications regulatory framework presented by the European Commission in September 2016. While many of the proposed changes appear meaningful, the report argues that overall the proposal does not entirely reflect the lessons learned from the past two decades of e-communications regulation in Europe, and ends up being at once too conservative (i.e. incremental with respect to legacy rules); fragile, since its effectiveness crucially depends on governance reform; and “retro”, since it does not incorporate principles of flexible, adaptive regulation in its overarching framework. The report argues that the merits of a lighter, ex post approach to e-communications were not sufficiently gauged by the European Commission in its impact assessment. The report was prepared at the request of Policy Department A and the IMCO Committee.

External author

Andrea Renda

How an EU Lifespan Guarantee Model Could Be Implemented Across the European Union

31-01-2017

This study was commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee. It looks at the interrelation between the Consumer Sales and Guarantee Directive (CSD) and the Ecodesign Directive (EDD) with respect to guarantees and product expected lifetime. Through legal research and stakeholder surveys, it develops an EU lifespan guarantee model, which could be implemented by amendments to the proposal for an Online ...

This study was commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee. It looks at the interrelation between the Consumer Sales and Guarantee Directive (CSD) and the Ecodesign Directive (EDD) with respect to guarantees and product expected lifetime. Through legal research and stakeholder surveys, it develops an EU lifespan guarantee model, which could be implemented by amendments to the proposal for an Online Sales Directive (OSD) and the EDD. It recommends extending the EDD to include the lifespan and extending the limitation period of the OSD. A commercial guarantee for the lifespan of a product is also suggested.

External author

Dr. Klaus TONNER; Prof. Rosalind MALCOLM

How an EU Lifespan Guarantee Model Could Be Implemented Across the European Union

30-01-2017

This study was commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee. It looks at the interrelation between the Consumer Sales and Guarantee Directive (CSD) and the Ecodesign Directive (EDD) with respect to guarantees and product expected lifetime. Through legal research and stakeholder surveys, it develops an EU lifespan guarantee model, which could be implemented by amendments to the proposal for an Online ...

This study was commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee. It looks at the interrelation between the Consumer Sales and Guarantee Directive (CSD) and the Ecodesign Directive (EDD) with respect to guarantees and product expected lifetime. Through legal research and stakeholder surveys, it develops an EU lifespan guarantee model, which could be implemented by amendments to the proposal for an Online Sales Directive (OSD) and the EDD. It recommends extending the EDD to include the lifespan and extending the limitation period of the OSD. A commercial guarantee for the lifespan of a product is also suggested.

External author

Klaus TONNER and Rosalind MALCOLM

Upcoming events

27-02-2017
The state and development of the biomass of fish stocks managed by the CFP
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PECH
28-02-2017
The Third Reform of the Common European Asylum System - Up for the Challenge
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LIBE
28-02-2017
Workshop on the consequences of Brexit
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IMCO

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