670

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Author
Keyword
Date

Plenary round-up – Strasbourg, June 2018

15-06-2018

The June plenary session highlights were the continuation of the debate on the future of Europe with the Prime Minister of the Netherlands, Mark Rutte, and the preparation of the European Council meeting of 28 and 29 June 2018. The European Commission and Council participated in discussions on, inter alia, the independence of the judiciary in Poland, humanitarian emergencies in the Mediterranean and solidarity in the EU, and the economic and monetary union package. VP/HR Federica Mogherini's statements ...

The June plenary session highlights were the continuation of the debate on the future of Europe with the Prime Minister of the Netherlands, Mark Rutte, and the preparation of the European Council meeting of 28 and 29 June 2018. The European Commission and Council participated in discussions on, inter alia, the independence of the judiciary in Poland, humanitarian emergencies in the Mediterranean and solidarity in the EU, and the economic and monetary union package. VP/HR Federica Mogherini's statements on the Iran nuclear deal, the annual report on human rights and democracy in the world (2017), and on the Georgian occupied territories ten years after the Russian invasion, were also discussed. Debates followed on the first anniversary of the signature of the Istanbul Convention and on the closure of the ivory market to combat poaching. Parliament approved the proposal to amend the regulation on OTC derivatives, an agreement on common rules in the field of civil aviation, on monitoring and reporting of CO2 emissions and on fuel consumption of heavy-duty vehicles. It approved the final text of a proposed directive on proportionality tests for new national professional regulations. It also approved the new composition of Parliament after 'Brexit', and further macro-financial assistance to Ukraine.

Future of Europe debates: Parliament hosts Heads of State or Government

08-06-2018

Against the background of the many challenges which the European Union has faced in recent years, the European Parliament has taken the lead in launching and hosting a series of high-profile debates on the Future of Europe, intended to run for the whole of 2018. While the Heads of State or Government of countries holding the rotating presidency of the Council – this year, Boyko Borissov of Bulgaria and Sebastian Kurz of Austria – routinely debate with MEPs in plenary, the leaders of other EU Member ...

Against the background of the many challenges which the European Union has faced in recent years, the European Parliament has taken the lead in launching and hosting a series of high-profile debates on the Future of Europe, intended to run for the whole of 2018. While the Heads of State or Government of countries holding the rotating presidency of the Council – this year, Boyko Borissov of Bulgaria and Sebastian Kurz of Austria – routinely debate with MEPs in plenary, the leaders of other EU Member States are now able to set out publicly their vision for Europe's future in a dialogue with the only directly elected European institution, during its plenary sittings. This process is all the more important at a time when the EU's Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) for the next seven years is being discussed: the choices surrounding the MFF and the direction in which the EU decides to develop are intrinsically linked. So far, at the invitation of its President, Antonio Tajani, the European Parliament has hosted the leaders of six Member States in the context of these 'Future of Europe' debates, welcoming the prime ministers of Ireland (Taoiseach), Leo Varadkar; Croatia, Andrej Plenković; and Portugal, António Costa; the President of France, Emmanuel Macron; and the prime ministers of Belgium, Charles Michel; and Luxembourg, Xavier Bettel. This Briefing provides an overview of where the Future of Europe debate stands in a number of key policy areas, such as economic and monetary union (EMU), the EU's social dimension, migration policy, security and defence, and broader institutional issues. It takes stock of the views expressed by those EU Heads of State or Government who have intervened in the debate so far, on how these areas might develop in the future.

What if technologies shaped the law?

07-06-2018

Is there a relationship between law, technological innovation, and regulatory governance? Are technologies ordinary objects of formal law that can fit into the traditional doctrinal classification? What if technologies were legal artefacts that question and challenge the traditional boundaries of legal thought? Has technology been developed to the extent that it exerts the functions of law? Is there a gradual shift from the traditional notion of "code is law" (i.e. code having the effect of law) ...

Is there a relationship between law, technological innovation, and regulatory governance? Are technologies ordinary objects of formal law that can fit into the traditional doctrinal classification? What if technologies were legal artefacts that question and challenge the traditional boundaries of legal thought? Has technology been developed to the extent that it exerts the functions of law? Is there a gradual shift from the traditional notion of "code is law" (i.e. code having the effect of law) to the new conception of "law is code"?

Composition of the European Parliament

06-06-2018

The European Parliament is due to give its consent to a decision of the European Council establishing the composition of the European Parliament for the next legislature with a vote in plenary in June. The decision aims to adjust the current distribution of seats among Member States and to redistribute some of the seats that would become vacant after the UK’s withdrawal from the EU. This is an updated version of an 'At a glance' note published in February 2018, PE 614.687.

The European Parliament is due to give its consent to a decision of the European Council establishing the composition of the European Parliament for the next legislature with a vote in plenary in June. The decision aims to adjust the current distribution of seats among Member States and to redistribute some of the seats that would become vacant after the UK’s withdrawal from the EU. This is an updated version of an 'At a glance' note published in February 2018, PE 614.687.

Plenary round-up – Strasbourg, May II 2018

31-05-2018

The May II plenary session highlights were the debate on the 2021-2027 Multiannual Financial Framework and own resources in the context of the publication of individual proposals for spending programmes, and the debate on the future of Europe with the Prime Minister of Luxembourg, Xavier Bettel. Alpha Condé, President of Guinea and the President of Colombia, Juan Manuel Santos Calderón, also addressed Parliament. VP/HR Federica Mogherini's statements on the situation in the Gaza Strip, the status ...

The May II plenary session highlights were the debate on the 2021-2027 Multiannual Financial Framework and own resources in the context of the publication of individual proposals for spending programmes, and the debate on the future of Europe with the Prime Minister of Luxembourg, Xavier Bettel. Alpha Condé, President of Guinea and the President of Colombia, Juan Manuel Santos Calderón, also addressed Parliament. VP/HR Federica Mogherini's statements on the situation in the Gaza Strip, the status of Jerusalem, and the situation in Nicaragua were also discussed. Debates followed on US tariffs in the steel and aluminium sector, the use of pre-accession funds in Turkey and the impact of delocalisation on workers and regions. Parliament approved the revision of the Posting of Workers Directive, and the modernisation of the Trade Defence Instruments Regulation (at second reading), and a multiannual plan for demersal stocks in the North Sea. Parliament voted, inter alia, on a number of own-initiative reports on implementation of the interinstitutional agreement on better law-making, odometer manipulation in motor vehicles, gender equality and women's empowerment, and minimum standards on rights, support and protection for victims of crime.

Brexit negotiations [What Think Tanks are thinking]

25-05-2018

European Union officials have warned the United Kingdom that time is running out if definitive agreement on the country’s withdrawal from the Union is to be reached by this autumn. Meanwhile, British Prime Minister, Theresa May, is struggling to keep her Cabinet and Conservative Party united as the focus of negotiations has shifted to the future customs regime and the accompanying, highly sensitive, issue of the border between Ireland and Northern Ireland. This note offers links to reports and commentaries ...

European Union officials have warned the United Kingdom that time is running out if definitive agreement on the country’s withdrawal from the Union is to be reached by this autumn. Meanwhile, British Prime Minister, Theresa May, is struggling to keep her Cabinet and Conservative Party united as the focus of negotiations has shifted to the future customs regime and the accompanying, highly sensitive, issue of the border between Ireland and Northern Ireland. This note offers links to reports and commentaries from some major international think-tanks and research institutes on Brexit negotiations and related issues. More reports on the topic can be found in a previous edition of ‘What Think Tanks are thinking’, published in January 2018.

The fight against terrorism

25-05-2018

Significant benefits could be achieved by the EU and its Member States by addressing the gaps and barriers in the area of the fight against terrorism, notably by developing an evidence-based EU criminal policy cycle involving the European Parliament and national parliaments. In this context, EU institutions should conduct comprehensive ex-ante assessments and ex-post evaluations of counterterrorism measures, in line with better law-making principles. The effectiveness and fundamental rights compliance ...

Significant benefits could be achieved by the EU and its Member States by addressing the gaps and barriers in the area of the fight against terrorism, notably by developing an evidence-based EU criminal policy cycle involving the European Parliament and national parliaments. In this context, EU institutions should conduct comprehensive ex-ante assessments and ex-post evaluations of counterterrorism measures, in line with better law-making principles. The effectiveness and fundamental rights compliance of counter-radicalisation programmes should continue to be monitored. The framework for countering terrorism requires further refinement. A European law enforcement culture with full respect for fundamental rights needs to be fostered in which relevant information is shared and analysed, judicial cooperation tools are properly utilised and seeking the support of EU agencies becomes a natural reflex. This also requires the allocation of significant resources aimed at training and exchanges. Beyond resulting in more relevant, coherent, effective and efficient action in the fight against terrorism, such measures could increase the wellbeing of the population, reduce the material and immaterial impacts of terrorism, and ensure protection of fundamental rights when impacted by counterterrorism measures.

Implementation of the Interinstitutional Agreement on Better Law-Making

23-05-2018

On 13 April 2016, the Commission, Parliament and Council signed the Interinstitutional Agreement (IIA) on Better Law-Making, replacing its 2003 predecessor. About two years on from its entry into force, Parliament is expected to vote on an own-initiative joint report on the interpretation and implementation of the IIA during its May II plenary session. The report takes stock of progress made and identifies the main issues outstanding.

On 13 April 2016, the Commission, Parliament and Council signed the Interinstitutional Agreement (IIA) on Better Law-Making, replacing its 2003 predecessor. About two years on from its entry into force, Parliament is expected to vote on an own-initiative joint report on the interpretation and implementation of the IIA during its May II plenary session. The report takes stock of progress made and identifies the main issues outstanding.

The Institutional Consequences of a ‘Hard Brexit’

15-05-2018

This in-depth analysis, commissioned by the European Parliament at the request of the Committee of Constitutional Affairs, considers the institutional, budgetary and policy implications that a so-called ‘hard Brexit’ would pose on the EU. It analyses from a legal perspective how a withdrawal of the UK from the EU without a withdrawal treaty, transition deal and framework on future relations would affect each specific EU Institution, the EU budget for the remaining years of the current MFF, and EU ...

This in-depth analysis, commissioned by the European Parliament at the request of the Committee of Constitutional Affairs, considers the institutional, budgetary and policy implications that a so-called ‘hard Brexit’ would pose on the EU. It analyses from a legal perspective how a withdrawal of the UK from the EU without a withdrawal treaty, transition deal and framework on future relations would affect each specific EU Institution, the EU budget for the remaining years of the current MFF, and EU policies in the crucial fields of trade, security and justice. While the study does not endorse a ‘hard Brexit’ it provides guidelines for the EU to be prepared in case such scenario were to materialise.

External author

Federico Fabbrini , Professor of EU Law & Director of the Brexit Institute, Dublin City University

THE INSTITUTIONAL CONSEQUENCES OF A BESPOKE AGREEMENT WITH THE UK BASED ON A “CLOSE COOPERATION” MODEL

15-05-2018

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the AFCO Committee, considers the governance and institutional aspects of a potential agreement on the future economic relationship between the Union and the UK based on a “close cooperation” model. “Close cooperation” agreements involve a strong ambition for economic integration, based in practice upon a high degree of alignment by the third country to the relevant ...

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the AFCO Committee, considers the governance and institutional aspects of a potential agreement on the future economic relationship between the Union and the UK based on a “close cooperation” model. “Close cooperation” agreements involve a strong ambition for economic integration, based in practice upon a high degree of alignment by the third country to the relevant Union acquis. Although the UK’s circumstances may well be unique, there are few grounds to believe that the formal terms for a Union-UK “close cooperation” agreement should be radically different from the experience gained and lessons learned from comparable relationships between the Union and other third countries. The special situation of the UK would be more likely to manifest itself empirically, through the practical operation and tangible outputs of the governance and institutional structures and processes established under any “close cooperation” agreement.

External author

Michael DOUGAN, University of Liverpool

Upcoming events

25-06-2018
State Aid and EU funding - Are they compatible?
Hearing -
CONT
25-06-2018
HEARING ON THE FACEBOOK/CAMBRIDGE ANALYTICA CASE - Part 2
Hearing -
LIBE
26-06-2018
Espionage in Europe throughout the ages
Other event -
EPRS

Partners

Stay connected

email update imageEmail updates system

You can follow anyone or anything linked to the Parliament using the email updates system, which sends updates directly to your mailbox. This includes the latest news about MEPs, committees, the news services or the Think Tank.

You can access the system from any page on the Parliament website. To sign up and receive notifications on Think Tank, simply submit your email address, select the subject you are interested in, indicate how often you want to be informed (daily, weekly or monthly) and confirm the registration by clicking on the link that will be emailed to you.

RSS imageRSS feeds

Follow all news and updates from the European Parliament website by making use of our RSS feed.

Please click on the link below to configure your RSS feed.

widget imageRSS widgets

Please click on the button below to add a widget covering publications available via the Think Tank to your website.

Create a RSS widget