426

result(s)

Word(s)
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Policy area
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Partnership for Research and Innovation in the Mediterranean Area (PRIMA)

26-09-2017

Following a request made by nine Member States in December 2014, on 18 October 2016 the European Commission adopted a proposal to establish a new public-public Partnership for Research and Innovation in the Mediterranean Area (PRIMA) under Article 185 TFEU. PRIMA would focus on two key socioeconomic issues that are important for the region: food systems and water resources. The decision adopted by the European Parliament and the Council in July 2017 establishes the partnership for a period of 10 ...

Following a request made by nine Member States in December 2014, on 18 October 2016 the European Commission adopted a proposal to establish a new public-public Partnership for Research and Innovation in the Mediterranean Area (PRIMA) under Article 185 TFEU. PRIMA would focus on two key socioeconomic issues that are important for the region: food systems and water resources. The decision adopted by the European Parliament and the Council in July 2017 establishes the partnership for a period of 10 years, and provides PRIMA with €220 million in EU funds from the Horizon 2020 framework programme for research, to match the commitments of the participating states. The proposal introduces derogations to the rules concerning participation in Horizon 2020 in order to allow third countries to join the partnerships. Fourth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

ITER

26-09-2017

The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project is a major global collaborative scientific experiment aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of nuclear fusion as an unlimited and relatively clean source of energy. The EU Member States participate by virtue of their membership of Euratom. Work on the site in France (Cadarache) began in 2007, but since then the expected final cost and year of completion have been revised upwards a number of times. It is now hoped that 'first plasma ...

The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project is a major global collaborative scientific experiment aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of nuclear fusion as an unlimited and relatively clean source of energy. The EU Member States participate by virtue of their membership of Euratom. Work on the site in France (Cadarache) began in 2007, but since then the expected final cost and year of completion have been revised upwards a number of times. It is now hoped that 'first plasma', the point at which the ITER device is deemed operational, will be achieved by 2025.

Agenda-setting in the European Council, December 2014 - June 2017

26-09-2017

The European Council plays an important role in European Union agenda-setting. Its task is to provide impetus and political direction to the European integration process. The Treaty of Lisbon has made the European Council an EU institution in legal terms, although its tasks remained virtually unchanged. It also introduced a permanent President. This study can be read as a follow-up to the ‘Analysis of Agenda Setting in the European Council, 2009-2014’, which examined the agenda of the institution ...

The European Council plays an important role in European Union agenda-setting. Its task is to provide impetus and political direction to the European integration process. The Treaty of Lisbon has made the European Council an EU institution in legal terms, although its tasks remained virtually unchanged. It also introduced a permanent President. This study can be read as a follow-up to the ‘Analysis of Agenda Setting in the European Council, 2009-2014’, which examined the agenda of the institution during the Presidency of Herman Van Rompuy. The focus here is on the first mandate of the second President of the European Council, Donald Tusk, from December 2014 to June 2017.

External author

This study has been written by Dr Petya Alexandrova Petrova of the University of Oxford at the request of the European Council Oversight Unit of the Directorate for Impact Assessment and European Added Value, within the Directorate General for Parliamentary Research Services (DG EPRS) of the General Secretariat of the European Parliament.

The Potential of Electricity Demand Response

15-09-2017

This report summarises the presentations and discussions made during a workshop on ‘The Potential of Electricity Demand Response’ organised on 30 May 2017 by Policy Department A for the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE). The aim of the workshop was to highlight the role and potential of electricity demand response in achieving the EU energy and climate policy targets, to illustrate the current experiences and progress towards deployment of demand response across the EU and to identify ...

This report summarises the presentations and discussions made during a workshop on ‘The Potential of Electricity Demand Response’ organised on 30 May 2017 by Policy Department A for the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE). The aim of the workshop was to highlight the role and potential of electricity demand response in achieving the EU energy and climate policy targets, to illustrate the current experiences and progress towards deployment of demand response across the EU and to identify and evaluate possible legislative and regulatory initiatives to optimally deploy the potential. The presentations and proceedings of this workshop should support the ITRE members in their evaluation of the related legislative proposals in the “Clean Energy for All Europeans package”.

External author

Luc VAN NUFFEL, Jessica YEARWOOD

European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom) - Structures and tools

08-09-2017

Euratom was created in 1957 to further European integration and tackle energy shortages through the peaceful use of nuclear power. It has the same members as the European Union and is governed by the Commission and Council, operating under the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice. Euratom regulates the European civil nuclear industry, which produces almost 30 % of energy in the EU. Euratom's work safeguards nuclear materials and technology, facilitates investment, research and development ...

Euratom was created in 1957 to further European integration and tackle energy shortages through the peaceful use of nuclear power. It has the same members as the European Union and is governed by the Commission and Council, operating under the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice. Euratom regulates the European civil nuclear industry, which produces almost 30 % of energy in the EU. Euratom's work safeguards nuclear materials and technology, facilitates investment, research and development, and ensures equal access to nuclear supplies, as well as the correct disposal of nuclear waste and the safety of operations. Its main instruments are the Euratom Supply Agency, and its research and nuclear safeguard activities. Notably, Euratom is involved in developing atomic fusion technology which has the potential of delivering abundant sustainable energy in the future. In March 2017, the United Kingdom officially notified the EU of its intention to withdraw from the Union and the Euratom Community. In the context of the negotiations which commenced in June 2017, the Commission has published a position paper outlining the main principles of the EU position concerning Euratom. Possible impacts on both Euratom and the UK nuclear industry are yet to be determined.

New rules on security of gas supply

05-09-2017

In February 2016, the Commission adopted a proposal to revise the 2010 regulation on security of gas supply. Trilogue negotiations in early 2017 produced an agreed text that was endorsed by the Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) committee in May 2017. The Parliament is due to vote on this text during the September 2017 plenary.

In February 2016, the Commission adopted a proposal to revise the 2010 regulation on security of gas supply. Trilogue negotiations in early 2017 produced an agreed text that was endorsed by the Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) committee in May 2017. The Parliament is due to vote on this text during the September 2017 plenary.

EU strategy on cooperative intelligent transport systems

31-08-2017

Digital technologies, and systems based on them, are being rapidly introduced in transport all over the world. Cooperative intelligent transport systems (C-ITS) in road transport are part of this development, and one element in a wider drive towards vehicle automation. These systems use technologies allowing road vehicles to communicate with other vehicles or road users and roadside infrastructure. By increasing the quality and reliability of information, C-ITS can improve road safety and traffic ...

Digital technologies, and systems based on them, are being rapidly introduced in transport all over the world. Cooperative intelligent transport systems (C-ITS) in road transport are part of this development, and one element in a wider drive towards vehicle automation. These systems use technologies allowing road vehicles to communicate with other vehicles or road users and roadside infrastructure. By increasing the quality and reliability of information, C-ITS can improve road safety and traffic efficiency as well as reduce energy consumption and emissions from transport, provided that cyber security and data protection are ensured. The European Commission has put forward a strategy outlining the path towards commercial deployment of C-ITS in the EU by 2019, seeking to avoid market fragmentation and maintain EU competitiveness. The main steps proposed are to adopt a legal framework for providing investors with legal certainty, to make EU funding available for projects, and to continue cooperation with EU stakeholders and international partners. The strategy addresses key issues such as data protection and cyber-security, systems interoperability and technical specifications. In the meantime, several ongoing pilot projects are consolidating the experience to be shared. The European Parliament, a long-time supporter of C-ITS and defender of personal data protection, is preparing a report on the strategy.

EU sustainability criteria for bioenergy

29-08-2017

Bioenergy, which is generally produced from plants such as agricultural crops or trees, comes in various forms. Wood and other solid biomass are commonly used for heating and electricity generation. Liquid biofuels for transport and other purposes are mainly made from food and feed crops, but can also be produced from waste and residues. Bioenergy can also be delivered in the form of gas. Bioenergy is a renewable but finite energy source, and considered as climate-friendly because the carbon which ...

Bioenergy, which is generally produced from plants such as agricultural crops or trees, comes in various forms. Wood and other solid biomass are commonly used for heating and electricity generation. Liquid biofuels for transport and other purposes are mainly made from food and feed crops, but can also be produced from waste and residues. Bioenergy can also be delivered in the form of gas. Bioenergy is a renewable but finite energy source, and considered as climate-friendly because the carbon which is emitted during combustion was removed from the atmosphere during growth of the biomass and will be removed again after some time if new plants are grown. However, its production and use has environmental impacts and the climate benefits may vary. The existing Renewable Energy Directive sets mandatory sustainability and greenhouse gas saving criteria for biofuels. For forest biomass, the Commission issued recommendations, but these are not uniformly implemented in the Member States. In November 2016, the Commission proposed a revised Renewable Energy Directive which includes mandatory sustainability criteria for both biofuels and biomass. The European Parliament supports sustainability criteria for bioenergy, and highlighted the sustainability issues of forest biomass in its June 2016 resolution on renewable energy. Stakeholder reactions to the Commission proposal have been mixed. While environmental NGOs called for stricter criteria, the bioenergy industries warned that tighter limits on conventional biofuels hinder the decarbonisation of the transport sector. Farmers and forest owners expressed concern about additional economic and administrative burden and stressed the principle of subsidiarity in forest policies.

Framework for energy efficiency labelling

27-07-2017

In July 2015, the Commission proposed a new regulation on energy efficiency labelling as part of its summer energy package. The proposed regulation seeks to restore the A-G scale for energy labelling; create a mechanism for rescaling products that can accommodate further improvements in energy efficiency; establish a product database on energy efficiency; and introduce a safeguard procedure to improve national market surveillance. The rescaling of different types of household products would be done ...

In July 2015, the Commission proposed a new regulation on energy efficiency labelling as part of its summer energy package. The proposed regulation seeks to restore the A-G scale for energy labelling; create a mechanism for rescaling products that can accommodate further improvements in energy efficiency; establish a product database on energy efficiency; and introduce a safeguard procedure to improve national market surveillance. The rescaling of different types of household products would be done through delegated acts from the Commission. While the proposal is supported by consumer and environmental groups, industry groups are concerned that a major change in energy labelling could have a negative impact on both producers and consumers, acting as a disincentive to greater energy efficiency. The Council adopted a general approach in November 2015. The Parliament approved a series of legislative amendments in July 2016. After several trilogue meetings, a provisional agreement was reached in March 2017. The agreed text was subsequently approved by the Parliament on 13 June and by the Council on 26 June 2017. This briefing updates an earlier edition, of February 2017: PE 599.282.

Competition Policy and an Internal Energy Market

18-07-2017

This study identifies selected important competition-related issues in the internal energy market. It discusses the role of competition law with respect to the following issues: State aid, congestion management, capacity remuneration mechanisms, balancing markets, effective competition between suppliers, integration of new players in the market, and energy poverty. To tackle these present and possible upcoming issues, the study provides indications regarding the current and future need for applying ...

This study identifies selected important competition-related issues in the internal energy market. It discusses the role of competition law with respect to the following issues: State aid, congestion management, capacity remuneration mechanisms, balancing markets, effective competition between suppliers, integration of new players in the market, and energy poverty. To tackle these present and possible upcoming issues, the study provides indications regarding the current and future need for applying instruments of competition law as well as other types of instruments. The study was provided by Policy Department A at the request of the ECON Committee.

External author

Robert Haffner, Olga Batura, Karolina Ryszka, Kimberley van den Bergen, Ecorys Netherlands

Upcoming events

26-09-2017
PANA Committee will look at the world of football as well as corporate tax planning
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26-09-2017
OECD-EPRS Policy Roundtable: The new production revolution
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27-09-2017
Policy Hub | Brexit: A Japanese perspective
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