768

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Policy area
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Keyword
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IMPLEMENTING THE PARIS AGREEMENT - COP23

13-10-2017

At the COP21 UN climate change conference in Paris in December 2015, a global agreement was reached which contains goals and mechanisms for responding to climate change and binding obligations for all Parties. The Paris Agreement sets a long-term goal of limiting the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2 degrees C above pre-industrial levels, and of pursuing efforts to limit this temperature increase to 1.5 degrees C. It also includes the goal to increase the ability to adapt ...

At the COP21 UN climate change conference in Paris in December 2015, a global agreement was reached which contains goals and mechanisms for responding to climate change and binding obligations for all Parties. The Paris Agreement sets a long-term goal of limiting the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2 degrees C above pre-industrial levels, and of pursuing efforts to limit this temperature increase to 1.5 degrees C. It also includes the goal to increase the ability to adapt to the adverse impacts of climate change and to make finance flows consistent with a pathway towards low greenhouse gas emissions. In order to achieve these goals, the Paris Agreement requires all Parties to undertake efforts towards reaching global peaking of greenhouse gas emissions as soon as possible and towards achieving a balance between anthropogenic emissions by sources and removals by sinks (“carbon neutrality”) in the second half of the 21st century.

External author

Lorenz MOOSMANN, Henrik NEIER, Nicole MANDL, Klaus RADUNSKY, Tina OHLIGER

Implementing the Aarhus Convention: Access to justice in environmental matters

11-10-2017

The Aarhus Convention on Access to Information, Public Participation in Decision-making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters is an international agreement that gives the public a number of rights with regard to the environment. It consists of three pillars, one of them covering the right of access to justice in cases of non-compliance with environmental law. Implementation of the convention's provisions on access to justice have been the focus of two recent documents, one published by the ...

The Aarhus Convention on Access to Information, Public Participation in Decision-making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters is an international agreement that gives the public a number of rights with regard to the environment. It consists of three pillars, one of them covering the right of access to justice in cases of non-compliance with environmental law. Implementation of the convention's provisions on access to justice have been the focus of two recent documents, one published by the European Commission and the other by the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) Aarhus Convention Compliance Committee. While the European Commission examines the implementation of the convention provisions in the Member States, the UNECE Committee takes a critical look at implementation at EU level. Both papers point to shortcomings, in particular with regard to the right of non-governmental organisations to be heard in court. Regarding implementation at Member State level, the Commission has launched a dialogue procedure with each Member State concerned. When it comes to implementation at EU level, the convention's Meeting of the Parties in September 2017 postponed its decision on the findings of the Aarhus Convention Compliance Committee in respect of the EU to its next meeting in 2021.

Cities: Front line of climate action

05-10-2017

Cities have a crucial role to play in addressing the climate change challenge and delivering on the ambitions of the Paris Agreement. In the European Union (EU), where nearly three quarters of the population live in urban areas, many cities are leading the way in this regard, taking action in three areas central to increasing energy efficiency and reducing emissions – namely, buildings, energy supply, and transport – and acting as living laboratories of climate-change-related innovation. The EU supports ...

Cities have a crucial role to play in addressing the climate change challenge and delivering on the ambitions of the Paris Agreement. In the European Union (EU), where nearly three quarters of the population live in urban areas, many cities are leading the way in this regard, taking action in three areas central to increasing energy efficiency and reducing emissions – namely, buildings, energy supply, and transport – and acting as living laboratories of climate-change-related innovation. The EU supports cities in their efforts by providing guidance, promoting experience-and knowledge-sharing, fostering cooperation, and funding climate action. Climate-relevant initiatives are in place in various policy fields, from transport to the environment, research and innovation, the most high profile being the Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy, which currently counts some 7 600 signatories. A supportive framework is essential to ensure city-level initiatives have enough resources and potential to effect meaningful change. Easing access to climate funding and strengthening the role of cities in climate governance are among the main challenges ahead, and the main demands of city associations. The latter issue is being examined by the European Parliament, notably in relation to the proposal for a regulation on energy union governance. Two own-initiative reports exploring the role cities play, first, in the implementation of the Paris Agreement, and, second, in the institutional framework of the Union, are also under preparation.

Chemicals and the circular economy: Dealing with substances of concern

02-10-2017

Unlike the traditional linear economic model based on a 'take-make-consume-throw away' pattern, the circular economy is an economic model based on sharing, leasing, reuse, repair, refurbishment and recycling, in an (almost) closed loop. One of the challenges associated with this model is the presence of substances of concern in products, which risk being passed on to waste and subsequently recycled. A large number of European Union (EU) legal acts are relevant to the theme of substances of concern ...

Unlike the traditional linear economic model based on a 'take-make-consume-throw away' pattern, the circular economy is an economic model based on sharing, leasing, reuse, repair, refurbishment and recycling, in an (almost) closed loop. One of the challenges associated with this model is the presence of substances of concern in products, which risk being passed on to waste and subsequently recycled. A large number of European Union (EU) legal acts are relevant to the theme of substances of concern in material cycles. They relate to three broad areas: chemicals, products and waste. The European Commission is expected to publish a communication on the interface between these policy areas by the end of 2017. The main challenge in relation to chemicals and the circular economy is increasing recycling and reuse, while making sure consumers are not at risk from exposure to substances of concern that may be present in products and passed on to waste. More specific challenges relate, among other things, to long-term exposure, lack of information, trade aspects and implementation of EU law. Increased policy coherence in the current regulatory framework could help the situation. More specifically, elements of possible remedies include: disseminating information about the presence of substances of concern in products, reducing and substituting them, and improving the management of substances of concern that cannot be substituted. However, there may be some difficulties in implementing these solutions, in particular regarding the administrative burden and costs. The European Parliament supports the development of non-toxic material cycles so that recycled waste can be used as a major, reliable source of raw materials. Stakeholders' views on the topic are mixed.

COP 23 climate change conference in Bonn

27-09-2017

The COP 23 climate change conference, presided by Fiji, will take place in Bonn, Germany, from 6 to 17 November 2017. The programme is focussed on the implementation of the Paris Agreement. In preparation of COP 23, the European Parliament has tabled questions to the European Commission and the Council. The Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety has adopted a motion for a resolution on COP 23 which is due to be voted during the October I plenary session.

The COP 23 climate change conference, presided by Fiji, will take place in Bonn, Germany, from 6 to 17 November 2017. The programme is focussed on the implementation of the Paris Agreement. In preparation of COP 23, the European Parliament has tabled questions to the European Commission and the Council. The Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety has adopted a motion for a resolution on COP 23 which is due to be voted during the October I plenary session.

Monitoring and reporting of CO2 emissions and fuel consumption of new heavy-duty vehicles

26-09-2017

The IA clearly defines the problems and the objectives of the proposed initiative, and relies on comprehensive and up to date sources of information. Overall, the objectives appear to be relevant, measurable, and achievable; however, some discrepancy seems to exist between the definition of the operational objective and the indicators suggested for monitoring and evaluating the impacts of the proposed initiative. In addition, two of the suggested indicators could have been better qualified, in order ...

The IA clearly defines the problems and the objectives of the proposed initiative, and relies on comprehensive and up to date sources of information. Overall, the objectives appear to be relevant, measurable, and achievable; however, some discrepancy seems to exist between the definition of the operational objective and the indicators suggested for monitoring and evaluating the impacts of the proposed initiative. In addition, two of the suggested indicators could have been better qualified, in order to make them operational. The IA lacks any precise quantification of the impacts of monitoring and reporting over time on HDV CO2 emissions in the EU, although this weakness is acknowledged and attributed to the lack of reliable methodology. The analysis of the impact on the competitiveness of SMEs appears to be, in general, insufficiently developed or explained. The Commission consulted a broad range of stakeholders, whose views are described and analysed extensively; however, at least two issues considered relevant by the large majority of stakeholders, were not taken up and dealt with in the IA. The IA appears to have addressed most of the RSB recommendations; however, the aspect regarding data sensitivity and the potential market-disruptive risks relating to the monitoring and data collecting system seems still to be insufficiently illustrated and the arguments used lack any supporting evidence. Finally, the IA seems to make a reasonable case for the preferred option, which is reflected in the legislative proposal; however it is unclear why vehicles of categories O3 and O4 (i.e. trailers), included in the scope of Article 2, are not covered by the IA.

Revision of the 'Eurovignette' directive

26-09-2017

The IA contains a wealth of information, data and research, both internal and external, but some parts of the complex analysis lack clarity and coherence. The extensive quantitative estimations are not always comparable in structure and thus difficult to relate to each other. The potential contribution of the options to the reduction of CO2 emissions and to the REFIT exercise remains vague, as well as their impact on SMEs. The IA concludes that higher revenues, better road quality and considerable ...

The IA contains a wealth of information, data and research, both internal and external, but some parts of the complex analysis lack clarity and coherence. The extensive quantitative estimations are not always comparable in structure and thus difficult to relate to each other. The potential contribution of the options to the reduction of CO2 emissions and to the REFIT exercise remains vague, as well as their impact on SMEs. The IA concludes that higher revenues, better road quality and considerable environmental and social benefits would compensate for the regulatory and compliance costs of the initiatives. At the same time, it acknowledges that under all options the impacts of the proposals are uncertain because the introduction of tolls remains voluntary and subject to national policy orientations.

Agenda-setting in the European Council, December 2014 - June 2017

26-09-2017

The European Council plays an important role in European Union agenda-setting. Its task is to provide impetus and political direction to the European integration process. The Treaty of Lisbon has made the European Council an EU institution in legal terms, although its tasks remained virtually unchanged. It also introduced a permanent President. This study can be read as a follow-up to the ‘Analysis of Agenda Setting in the European Council, 2009-2014’, which examined the agenda of the institution ...

The European Council plays an important role in European Union agenda-setting. Its task is to provide impetus and political direction to the European integration process. The Treaty of Lisbon has made the European Council an EU institution in legal terms, although its tasks remained virtually unchanged. It also introduced a permanent President. This study can be read as a follow-up to the ‘Analysis of Agenda Setting in the European Council, 2009-2014’, which examined the agenda of the institution during the Presidency of Herman Van Rompuy. The focus here is on the first mandate of the second President of the European Council, Donald Tusk, from December 2014 to June 2017.

External author

This study has been written by Dr Petya Alexandrova Petrova of the University of Oxford at the request of the European Council Oversight Unit of the Directorate for Impact Assessment and European Added Value, within the Directorate General for Parliamentary Research Services (DG EPRS) of the General Secretariat of the European Parliament.

Towards a circular economy-Waste management in the EU

25-09-2017

This STOA study explores waste management in the EU. Around one third of EU municipal waste was sent to landfill in 2012. To turn waste into a resource, waste management objectives must be aligned with the goals of a circular economy transition. This report highlights progress and challenges across Member States and in municipalities for (1) reducing waste, and (2) generating high-quality waste streams for re-use and recovery. It focuses on the current policy landscape, trends, and technologies for ...

This STOA study explores waste management in the EU. Around one third of EU municipal waste was sent to landfill in 2012. To turn waste into a resource, waste management objectives must be aligned with the goals of a circular economy transition. This report highlights progress and challenges across Member States and in municipalities for (1) reducing waste, and (2) generating high-quality waste streams for re-use and recovery. It focuses on the current policy landscape, trends, and technologies for the five waste streams identified in the European Commission´s Circular Economy Action Plan. Employment opportunities for the different steps of the waste hierarchy as well as future policy options are identified and discussed.

External author

EPRS, DG

Implementing the Paris Agreement – New Challenges in View of the COP 23 Climate Change Conference

15-09-2017

This study summarises the developments leading to the adoption of the Paris Agreement on climate change in 2015 and provides an overview of its contents. The further implementation process and the roles of the main Parties and other stakeholders are discussed, as well as related international developments and the challenges of the climate change conference in Bonn in November 2017. The study was provided by Policy Department A at the request of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and ...

This study summarises the developments leading to the adoption of the Paris Agreement on climate change in 2015 and provides an overview of its contents. The further implementation process and the roles of the main Parties and other stakeholders are discussed, as well as related international developments and the challenges of the climate change conference in Bonn in November 2017. The study was provided by Policy Department A at the request of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI).

External author

Lorenz MOOSMANN, Henrik NEIER, Nicole MANDL, Klaus RADUNSKY

Upcoming events

17-10-2017
EU action on Energy and Climate Change (European Court of Auditors)
Other event -
EPRS
18-10-2017
Book presentation: 'Communitati et Orbi' by Rabbi Pinchas Goldschmidt
Other event -
EPRS
18-10-2017
INTA Workshop on EU-GCC Trade relations - 18 October 2017
Workshop -
INTA

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