745

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Outlook for the European Council meeting on 22-23 June 2017 and the European Council (Article 50) meeting on 22 June 2017

20-06-2017

At their meeting on 22-23 June 2017, EU leaders will focus on internal security, including, most probably, the fight against terrorism, as well as external security, when they will assess progress made in European defence cooperation. They will also review progress on deepening and modernising the Single Market, and endorse the country-specific recommendations under the European Semester process. In addition, migration, external relations and the Paris Agreement on climate change are to be discussed ...

At their meeting on 22-23 June 2017, EU leaders will focus on internal security, including, most probably, the fight against terrorism, as well as external security, when they will assess progress made in European defence cooperation. They will also review progress on deepening and modernising the Single Market, and endorse the country-specific recommendations under the European Semester process. In addition, migration, external relations and the Paris Agreement on climate change are to be discussed. Although not on the draft agenda, EU leaders will probably address current issues related to trade. Finally, EU-27 leaders will meet in a separate formal European Council (Article 50) without the United Kingdom, to discuss the latest developments following the UK’s formal notification of its withdrawal from the EU.

European Council Conclusions: A Rolling Check-List of Commitments to Date (12th edition)

20-06-2017

The European Council's role – to 'provide the Union with the necessary impetus for its development' and to define its 'general political directions and priorities' - has developed rapidly over the past seven years. Since June 2014, the European Council Oversight Unit within the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS), the European Parliament's in-house research service and think-tank, has been monitoring and analysing the European Council's delivery of the various commitments made in the conclusions ...

The European Council's role – to 'provide the Union with the necessary impetus for its development' and to define its 'general political directions and priorities' - has developed rapidly over the past seven years. Since June 2014, the European Council Oversight Unit within the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS), the European Parliament's in-house research service and think-tank, has been monitoring and analysing the European Council's delivery of the various commitments made in the conclusions of its meetings. This overview, presented in the form of a regularly updated Rolling Check-List of Commitments to Date, is designed to review the degree of progress in realising the goals which the European Council has set itself since January 2010 and to assist the Parliament in exercising its important oversight role in this field.

Policy Departments’ Monthly Highlights - June 2017

12-06-2017

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

Paris Agreement: United States withdrawal

09-06-2017

On 1 June 2017, US President Donald Trump announced that the United States would withdraw from the Paris Agreement on climate change and try to negotiate a deal that is more favourable to the USA. The withdrawal could come into effect in November 2020 at the earliest, coinciding with the next presidential elections in the USA. Global reactions to the announcement were mostly negative.

On 1 June 2017, US President Donald Trump announced that the United States would withdraw from the Paris Agreement on climate change and try to negotiate a deal that is more favourable to the USA. The withdrawal could come into effect in November 2020 at the earliest, coinciding with the next presidential elections in the USA. Global reactions to the announcement were mostly negative.

Advanced biofuels: Technologies and EU policy

08-06-2017

Road transport remains significantly more dependent on fossil fuels than other sectors. In the early 2000s, biofuels appeared as a way to reduce this dependency and to cut greenhouse gas emissions. However, when greenhouse gas emission reductions through using conventional biofuels were called into question because of the indirect effects involved, advanced biofuels emerged as an alternative. Although the advanced biofuels sector has been facing technological challenges and economic difficulties, ...

Road transport remains significantly more dependent on fossil fuels than other sectors. In the early 2000s, biofuels appeared as a way to reduce this dependency and to cut greenhouse gas emissions. However, when greenhouse gas emission reductions through using conventional biofuels were called into question because of the indirect effects involved, advanced biofuels emerged as an alternative. Although the advanced biofuels sector has been facing technological challenges and economic difficulties, global advanced biofuels production has been forecast to double between 2013 and 2020, with the largest (planned and in operation) production capacity located in Europe. In 2016, most advanced biofuels production routes were at prototype or demonstration stage, with two being considered ready for commercialisation. Advanced biofuels may offer a series of opportunities, in particular as regards greenhouse gas emission savings and energy security, but also pose a series of challenges, in particular as regards sustainability. EU policy support for biofuels started in 2003, but has since been shifting away from conventional biofuels. Since 2015, it has explicitly supported advanced biofuels. A legislative proposal on the regulatory framework beyond 2020, put forward by the European Commission in 2016, seeks to strengthen this support. In addition, funding opportunities are being provided through various programmes.

European Environment Agency: Mission, governance, output

02-06-2017

The European Environment Agency (EEA) is an agency of the European Union; it was established in 1993 and has its seat in Copenhagen. Its main mission is to provide the EU with objective, reliable and comparable information on the basis of which to conduct environment policy, assess environmental impacts and inform the public about the state of the environment. The Agency's main clients are the European Commission, the European Parliament and the Council, as well as its 33 member countries. Its main ...

The European Environment Agency (EEA) is an agency of the European Union; it was established in 1993 and has its seat in Copenhagen. Its main mission is to provide the EU with objective, reliable and comparable information on the basis of which to conduct environment policy, assess environmental impacts and inform the public about the state of the environment. The Agency's main clients are the European Commission, the European Parliament and the Council, as well as its 33 member countries. Its main bodies are the Management Board, which sets the main course, the Executive Director, who heads the Agency, and the Scientific Committee, which provides advice. The EEA has a budget of about €50 million and employs about 200 staff. The EEA's work is supported by the European Environment Information and Observation Network (Eionet), which is made up of European topic centres (consortia of organisations with expertise in a given area) and about 1 500 experts from national environmental organisations. The work of the EEA is based on five-yearly multiannual work programmes implemented through annual work programmes. The Agency's flagship publication is the report on the state and outlook of the European environment (SOER), which provides an assessment of the European environment, trends and prospects. Regular evaluations of the Agency and Eionet are programmed to take place every five years. The European Commission is currently carrying out a 'fitness check' evaluation of the two structures, with conclusions expected by the end of 2017. The European Parliament recognises the role of the EEA as a provider of information on the environment. It recently issued a series of recommendations regarding, among other things, transparency, gender balance, indicators and resources.

Climate change and the environment

01-06-2017

At the UN climate conference in Paris in December 2015, Parties worldwide agreed to limit global warming to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels. The EU is committed to reducing greenhouse gas emissions by at least 40% below 1990 levels by 2030, while improving energy efficiency by 27% and increasing the share of renewable energy sources to 27% of final consumption. A key mechanism in fighting climate change is the EU Emissions Trading System.

At the UN climate conference in Paris in December 2015, Parties worldwide agreed to limit global warming to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels. The EU is committed to reducing greenhouse gas emissions by at least 40% below 1990 levels by 2030, while improving energy efficiency by 27% and increasing the share of renewable energy sources to 27% of final consumption. A key mechanism in fighting climate change is the EU Emissions Trading System.

Biodiversity, nature and soil

01-06-2017

The 1992 UN Conference on the Environment and Development marked a major step forward for the conservation of biodiversity and the protection of nature thanks to the adoption of the Convention on Biological Diversity. In 2011 the EU committed itself to halting the loss of biodiversity and the degradation of ecosystem services in the EU by 2020. Other objectives set out in the Habitats Directive or the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) remain to ...

The 1992 UN Conference on the Environment and Development marked a major step forward for the conservation of biodiversity and the protection of nature thanks to the adoption of the Convention on Biological Diversity. In 2011 the EU committed itself to halting the loss of biodiversity and the degradation of ecosystem services in the EU by 2020. Other objectives set out in the Habitats Directive or the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) remain to be achieved. Since 1992, LIFE has been the most important financial instrument for the protection of biodiversity in the EU.

Water protection and management

01-06-2017

Water is essential for human, animal and plant life and is an indispensable resource for the economy. Its protection and management transcend national boundaries. EU water legislation was transformed with the adoption in 2000 of the Water Framework Directive (WFD), which introduced a holistic approach for the management and protection of surface waters and groundwater based on river basins. The WFD is supplemented by international agreements and legislation relating to water quantity, quality and ...

Water is essential for human, animal and plant life and is an indispensable resource for the economy. Its protection and management transcend national boundaries. EU water legislation was transformed with the adoption in 2000 of the Water Framework Directive (WFD), which introduced a holistic approach for the management and protection of surface waters and groundwater based on river basins. The WFD is supplemented by international agreements and legislation relating to water quantity, quality and pollution.

Sustainable consumption and production

01-06-2017

Sustainable growth is one of the main objectives of the European Union. Faced with a global scarcity of natural resources, ‘doing more with less’ has become the main challenge for producers and consumers. To address this challenge, the EU has introduced a whole range of policies and initiatives aimed at sustainable consumption and production. These should improve the overall environmental performance of products throughout their life cycle, stimulate demand for better products and production technologies ...

Sustainable growth is one of the main objectives of the European Union. Faced with a global scarcity of natural resources, ‘doing more with less’ has become the main challenge for producers and consumers. To address this challenge, the EU has introduced a whole range of policies and initiatives aimed at sustainable consumption and production. These should improve the overall environmental performance of products throughout their life cycle, stimulate demand for better products and production technologies, and help consumers make informed choices.

Upcoming events

26-06-2017
Gender equality in the media sector in the EU
Hearing -
FEMM
26-06-2017
Antimicrobial Resistance
Workshop -
ENVI
26-06-2017
Twelfth meeting of the IMCO Working Group on the Digital Single Market
Other event -
IMCO

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