202

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Policy area
Author
Keyword
Date

Outcome of the informal European Council and informal meeting of 27 Heads of State or Government on 3 February 2017

10-02-2017

The Maltese capital, Valletta, hosted an informal European Council meeting, as well as an informal meeting of EU-27 leaders on 3 February 2017. The first meeting concentrated on migration on the Central Mediterranean route, while the second looked at the future of the EU and preparations for the approaching 60th anniversary of the Rome Treaties on 25 March 2017. EU leaders also discussed the challenges for Europe in the wider global context. The President of the European Council, Donald Tusk, and ...

The Maltese capital, Valletta, hosted an informal European Council meeting, as well as an informal meeting of EU-27 leaders on 3 February 2017. The first meeting concentrated on migration on the Central Mediterranean route, while the second looked at the future of the EU and preparations for the approaching 60th anniversary of the Rome Treaties on 25 March 2017. EU leaders also discussed the challenges for Europe in the wider global context. The President of the European Council, Donald Tusk, and the Maltese Prime Minister and President-in-office of the Council, Joseph Muscat, stressed that the Members of the European Council agreed that ‘transatlantic cooperation remains an absolute priority for the EU’. On the eve of the informal European Council, President Tusk met with Prime Minister Muscat, the European Parliament President Antonio Tajani and Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker.  

What if animal farming were not so bad for the environment?

08-02-2017

What options exist, especially in terms of new technologies, for reducing the carbon footprint of the livestock industry, how effective might they be, and what could be done to encourage their implementation? The livestock industry is responsible for around 14.5 % of global greenhouse gas emissions. The magnitude of this percentage is due to the emission of large amounts of methane and nitrous oxide, which both result in greater global warming than carbon dioxide per gram of gas released. The main ...

What options exist, especially in terms of new technologies, for reducing the carbon footprint of the livestock industry, how effective might they be, and what could be done to encourage their implementation? The livestock industry is responsible for around 14.5 % of global greenhouse gas emissions. The magnitude of this percentage is due to the emission of large amounts of methane and nitrous oxide, which both result in greater global warming than carbon dioxide per gram of gas released. The main cause of livestock methane emissions is the digestive process in ruminants, such as cattle and sheep. In these animals, food is fermented, generating methane which is burped out. Nitrous oxide is generated through the application of fertilisers for animal feed production. This is also the case with crops grown for human consumption, but, as most of the energy stored in crops is lost when they are fed to animals, emissions due to fertilisers are much greater per calorie of animal produce than of plant produce. Both gases are produced by the storage of manure and its application as a fertiliser. In addition, carbon dioxide is emitted through burning fossil fuels for purposes such as fertiliser production, operation of farm machinery and transport of goods.

Major changes in European public opinion regarding the EU

23-01-2017

This exploratory study on major changes in European public opinion (updated in November 2016) was carried out on the basis of the Eurobaroeter surveys carried out between 1973 and 2016. The following aspects were studied: changes in European public opinion regarding the European Union and its institutions; democracy in the European Union; the economy of the European Union; the lives of Europeans; immigration.

This exploratory study on major changes in European public opinion (updated in November 2016) was carried out on the basis of the Eurobaroeter surveys carried out between 1973 and 2016. The following aspects were studied: changes in European public opinion regarding the European Union and its institutions; democracy in the European Union; the economy of the European Union; the lives of Europeans; immigration.

EU budget reform [What Think Tanks are thinking]

20-01-2017

A long-running discussion on reforming the European Union's budget gained momentum when the High-Level Group on Own Resources, led by former Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti, presented its report in January 2017. The report proposes simpler methods for funding the EU, to make it less reliant on direct contributions from Member States, and recommends that spending be focused on areas where the highest European added value can be achieved, now, for example migration and security emergencies. The ...

A long-running discussion on reforming the European Union's budget gained momentum when the High-Level Group on Own Resources, led by former Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti, presented its report in January 2017. The report proposes simpler methods for funding the EU, to make it less reliant on direct contributions from Member States, and recommends that spending be focused on areas where the highest European added value can be achieved, now, for example migration and security emergencies. The report, entitled 'Future financing of the EU', lists and examines several options for new own resources, such as a reformed VAT-linked resource, an EU corporate tax, a financial transaction tax or taxes linked to efforts to fight climate change. It also proposes to explore other revenue sources stemming directly from the EU policies and programmes. The report will be taken into consideration by the European Commission and EU Member States when they work on the EU's next long-term budget after 2020. This note offers links to reports and commentaries from some major international think tanks and research institutes on the EU budget. Some papers also discuss whether the euro area should have its own, dedicated budget.

What if computers were trillions of times faster?

17-01-2017

Could the theory of quantum mechanics one day revolutionise commonplace technical devices such as sensors, communication devices and computers? Quantum mechanics is a scientific theory that has revolutionised our understanding of the Universe. In the world of classical physics, a system is always in one particular state (e.g. at rest or in motion) while in the quantum world, a system can be in a superposition of two or more states. Performing a measurement on such a superposition causes it to collapse ...

Could the theory of quantum mechanics one day revolutionise commonplace technical devices such as sensors, communication devices and computers? Quantum mechanics is a scientific theory that has revolutionised our understanding of the Universe. In the world of classical physics, a system is always in one particular state (e.g. at rest or in motion) while in the quantum world, a system can be in a superposition of two or more states. Performing a measurement on such a superposition causes it to collapse into a single state. Furthermore, in contrast to the classical world, where a system can be measured without changing it, in the quantum world a measurement can have an impact on the state of the system.

The Budgetary Tools for Financing the EU External Policy

16-01-2017

The paper provides an overview of the current set-up of tools contributing to the funding of the EU external policies. The focus is on the recently established instruments and how they relate to the previously existing ones. The paper provides a first assessment of the current and envisaged set up of tools with regards to the following key aspects: added-value, coherence, flexibility and simplification, and democratic oversight of EU funding for external action.

The paper provides an overview of the current set-up of tools contributing to the funding of the EU external policies. The focus is on the recently established instruments and how they relate to the previously existing ones. The paper provides a first assessment of the current and envisaged set up of tools with regards to the following key aspects: added-value, coherence, flexibility and simplification, and democratic oversight of EU funding for external action.

External author

Roland Blomeyer, Sebastian Paulo and Elsa Perreau (Blomeyer & Sanz)

Brexit Implications for Employment and Social Affairs: Facts and Figures

16-01-2017

This document provides statistical and factual reference material relating to migration flows between the UK and the rest of the EU. It gives facts and figures relating to the population of EU-27 nationals living in the UK as well as UK citizens living in the EU-27. It also examines the impact of the EU-27 population on the UK’s social security and health care system and gives information on the UK’s uptake of EU funding.

This document provides statistical and factual reference material relating to migration flows between the UK and the rest of the EU. It gives facts and figures relating to the population of EU-27 nationals living in the UK as well as UK citizens living in the EU-27. It also examines the impact of the EU-27 population on the UK’s social security and health care system and gives information on the UK’s uptake of EU funding.

External author

Lucia Barbone, Martha Green, Stefan Speckesser and Andrea Broughton

Proceedings of the Workshop on "Collaborative Economy"

16-01-2017

This proceedings summaries the workshop chaired by MEP Nicola DANTI on collaborative economy. The workshop is a part of the overall work done within the European Parliament in order to deal with this new form of economy in the context of the Single Market. This document was prepared by Policy Department A at the request of the Committee on Internal Market and Consumer Protection.

This proceedings summaries the workshop chaired by MEP Nicola DANTI on collaborative economy. The workshop is a part of the overall work done within the European Parliament in order to deal with this new form of economy in the context of the Single Market. This document was prepared by Policy Department A at the request of the Committee on Internal Market and Consumer Protection.

External author

Alexandros GONIADIS

Precision Agriculture and the Future of Farming in Europe

22-12-2016

This study resulted in the identification of four main future opportunities and concerns regarding precision agriculture (PA), or precision farming, in the EU, on which the European Parliament could take anticipatory action now: 1.  PA can actively contribute to food security and safety; 2.  PA supports sustainable farming; 3.  PA will trigger societal changes along with its uptake; 4.  PA requires new skills to be learned. The wide diversity of agriculture throughout the EU, regarding particularly ...

This study resulted in the identification of four main future opportunities and concerns regarding precision agriculture (PA), or precision farming, in the EU, on which the European Parliament could take anticipatory action now: 1.  PA can actively contribute to food security and safety; 2.  PA supports sustainable farming; 3.  PA will trigger societal changes along with its uptake; 4.  PA requires new skills to be learned. The wide diversity of agriculture throughout the EU, regarding particularly farm size, types of farming, farming practices, output and employment, presents a challenge for European policy-makers. European policy measures therefore should differentiate between Member States, taking into account that the opportunities and concerns vary highly from one country to another.

The UK's Potential Withdrawal from the EU and Single market Access under EU Financial Services Legislation

15-12-2016

In the aftermath of the UK’s vote to leave the EU, securing continued access to each other’s markets will be one of the key issues to be addressed in the exit negotiations. This paper examines how the current EU financial services legislation ensures or facilitates access to the EU single financial market for EU/EEA Member States and third countries. The analysis focuses on passporting/mutual recognition regimes for EU/EEA Member States and third country equivalence regimes. This document was provided ...

In the aftermath of the UK’s vote to leave the EU, securing continued access to each other’s markets will be one of the key issues to be addressed in the exit negotiations. This paper examines how the current EU financial services legislation ensures or facilitates access to the EU single financial market for EU/EEA Member States and third countries. The analysis focuses on passporting/mutual recognition regimes for EU/EEA Member States and third country equivalence regimes. This document was provided by Policy Department A at the request of the ECON Committee.

External author

Olha CHEREDNYCHENKO

Upcoming events

27-02-2017
The state and development of the biomass of fish stocks managed by the CFP
Hearing -
PECH
28-02-2017
The Third Reform of the Common European Asylum System - Up for the Challenge
Other event -
LIBE
28-02-2017
Workshop on the consequences of Brexit
Workshop -
IMCO

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