820

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Author
Keyword
Date

Donald Trump's executive order on immigration

07-02-2017

On 27 January 2017, newly installed US President, Donald Trump, signed an executive order, which, amongst other things, suspended nearly all travellers from seven Muslim-majority states from entry to the United States. The executive order has led to protests in the country and has been challenged in court, while several international leaders have spoken out against it.

On 27 January 2017, newly installed US President, Donald Trump, signed an executive order, which, amongst other things, suspended nearly all travellers from seven Muslim-majority states from entry to the United States. The executive order has led to protests in the country and has been challenged in court, while several international leaders have spoken out against it.

Review of the ePrivacy Directive

03-02-2017

The technological, economic and social landscape has significantly changed since the adoption of Directive 2002/58 on privacy in electronic communications. In spite of targeted amendments adopted in 2009, the current text of the directive does not entirely reflect recent evolutions in the sector and in consumers' habits. Some of the most notable changes in this respect include the entry of new types of players on the market and the widespread usage of internet-based services, such as instant messaging ...

The technological, economic and social landscape has significantly changed since the adoption of Directive 2002/58 on privacy in electronic communications. In spite of targeted amendments adopted in 2009, the current text of the directive does not entirely reflect recent evolutions in the sector and in consumers' habits. Some of the most notable changes in this respect include the entry of new types of players on the market and the widespread usage of internet-based services, such as instant messaging, with a potential impact on the effectiveness of existing ePrivacy rules. In addition, the adoption of the General Data Protection Regulation in 2016 has altered the legislative framework on data protection, possibly calling into question the relevance and continued coherence of the ePrivacy Directive with the new legislation. Evidence collected to evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, coherence, relevance and EU added value of Directive 2002/58, as well as the feedback gathered by the European Commission through targeted workshops, an online public consultation and a Eurobarometer survey, have confirmed the existence of various challenges. These were also raised during a dedicated conference organised by the European Parliament in 2015. In particular, some of the key provisions of the directive have not been fully effective in delivering the intended levels of confidentiality and protection envisaged by the legislator. This is the case of Article 5(3), for instance, on cookies and other techniques to store and access information on users' equipment, a point that was raised on various occasions also by the Members of the European Parliament. Moreover, it appears that some parts of Directive 2002/58 have become technologically obsolete or that better legal approaches have been adopted in the meantime. Finally, an analysis of the implementation of EU ePrivacy rules in the Member States pointed to various degrees of legal fragmentation, the coexistence of different levels of protection across the EU, and a complex governance structure with responsibilities for implementation and enforcement allocated to different types of authorities, at times even within the same country. Overall, this has contributed to a lack of legal certainty and clarity, and the absence of a level playing field across Europe. On the other hand, the EU added value and the overall relevance of having dedicated provisions protecting privacy and ensuring the practical application of Article 7 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, was repeatedly confirmed. Indeed, a modernisation of the current rules is a central component of the EU's digital single market strategy, and is expected to restore and increase citizens' and businesses' trust in the digital environment. On 10 January 2017, the European Commission adopted a proposal to repeal Directive 2002/58 and replace it with a regulation to address several of the issues outlined above, to simplify existing rules and to make them future-proof. The co-legislators will now have the task of finding a balance between the various conflicting positions and expectations that have emerged throughout the process leading to the directive's review.

Safe countries of origin: Proposed common EU list

02-02-2017

As part of the European Agenda on Migration, the Commission proposed a regulation on 9 September 2015 to establish a common EU list of safe countries of origin, initially comprising Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Kosovo, Montenegro, Serbia and Turkey. The aim is to fast-track asylum applications from citizens of these countries, which are considered 'safe' in full compliance with the criteria set out in the Asylum Procedures Directive 2013/32/EU and the ...

As part of the European Agenda on Migration, the Commission proposed a regulation on 9 September 2015 to establish a common EU list of safe countries of origin, initially comprising Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Kosovo, Montenegro, Serbia and Turkey. The aim is to fast-track asylum applications from citizens of these countries, which are considered 'safe' in full compliance with the criteria set out in the Asylum Procedures Directive 2013/32/EU and the principle of non-refoulement. Currently, lists are defined at national level and not coordinated, which can lead to different recognition rates of similar asylum applications, and thus create incentives for secondary movements and asylum-shopping.

European Commission follow-up to European Parliament requests

02-02-2017

In addition to its well-known role as a co-legislator, the European Parliament also supervises and scrutinises the work of the European Commission. The Parliament can therefore ask the Commission to take action to fulfil its role as guardian of the Treaties and to contribute to the improved functioning of the European Union and its legislation. Such requests usually take the form of resolutions. This Rolling Check-List covers the resolutions adopted by Parliament on the basis of own-initiative reports ...

In addition to its well-known role as a co-legislator, the European Parliament also supervises and scrutinises the work of the European Commission. The Parliament can therefore ask the Commission to take action to fulfil its role as guardian of the Treaties and to contribute to the improved functioning of the European Union and its legislation. Such requests usually take the form of resolutions. This Rolling Check-List covers the resolutions adopted by Parliament on the basis of own-initiative reports and legislative own-initiative reports during the current eighth legislative term up to December 2015, and the actions taken by the Commission as a result up to 31 October 2016. In total, the report covers 97 resolutions across almost all parliamentary committees. It provides a detailed overview of the Parliament's requests, and tracks the Commission's response and any further action taken. It thus offers a comprehensive scrutiny and reference tool, providing easy access to the follow-up given by the Commission to the Parliament's requests.

Outlook for the informal European Council and informal meeting of 27 Heads of State or Government on 3 February 2017

01-02-2017

The informal summit taking place on 3 February 2017 in Valletta, Malta, will take place in two parts: an informal European Council meeting in which all EU Member States will participate, followed by an informal meeting of the 27 Heads of State or Government without the UK. The informal European Council will discuss further steps to address the migration crisis, in particular the external dimension of migration. The main issues will be the Central Mediterranean route and EU-Libya cooperation. EU leaders ...

The informal summit taking place on 3 February 2017 in Valletta, Malta, will take place in two parts: an informal European Council meeting in which all EU Member States will participate, followed by an informal meeting of the 27 Heads of State or Government without the UK. The informal European Council will discuss further steps to address the migration crisis, in particular the external dimension of migration. The main issues will be the Central Mediterranean route and EU-Libya cooperation. EU leaders will also exchange views on other international challenges and the wider global context. The EU-27 leaders will then continue their reflection on their common future.

Free movement of persons

01-02-2017

Freedom of movement and residence for persons in the EU is the cornerstone of Union citizenship, established by the Treaty of Maastricht in 1992. The gradual phasing-out of internal borders under the Schengen agreements was followed by the adoption of Directive 2004/38/EC on the right of EU citizens and their family members to move and reside freely within the EU. Notwithstanding the importance of this right, substantial implementation obstacles persist, ten years after the deadline for implementation ...

Freedom of movement and residence for persons in the EU is the cornerstone of Union citizenship, established by the Treaty of Maastricht in 1992. The gradual phasing-out of internal borders under the Schengen agreements was followed by the adoption of Directive 2004/38/EC on the right of EU citizens and their family members to move and reside freely within the EU. Notwithstanding the importance of this right, substantial implementation obstacles persist, ten years after the deadline for implementation of the Directive.

European Citizens’ Initiative

01-02-2017

The European Citizens’ Initiative (ECI) is an important instrument of participatory democracy in the European Union, allowing one million EU citizens residing in at least one quarter of the Member States to invite the Commission to submit a proposal for a legal act to implement the EU Treaties. Since the application of Regulation (EU) No 211/2011establishing detailed procedures and conditions for the ECI, three initiatives have been successfully submitted to the Commission.

The European Citizens’ Initiative (ECI) is an important instrument of participatory democracy in the European Union, allowing one million EU citizens residing in at least one quarter of the Member States to invite the Commission to submit a proposal for a legal act to implement the EU Treaties. Since the application of Regulation (EU) No 211/2011establishing detailed procedures and conditions for the ECI, three initiatives have been successfully submitted to the Commission.

An area of freedom, security and justice: general aspects

01-02-2017

The Lisbon Treaty attaches great importance to the creation of an area of freedom, security and justice. It introduced several important new features: a more efficient and more democratic decision-making procedure that comes in response to the abolition of the old pillar structure, bringing more accountability and legitimacy; increased powers for the Court of Justice of the European Union; and a new role for national parliaments. Basic rights are strengthened by a Charter of Fundamental Rights that ...

The Lisbon Treaty attaches great importance to the creation of an area of freedom, security and justice. It introduced several important new features: a more efficient and more democratic decision-making procedure that comes in response to the abolition of the old pillar structure, bringing more accountability and legitimacy; increased powers for the Court of Justice of the European Union; and a new role for national parliaments. Basic rights are strengthened by a Charter of Fundamental Rights that is now legally binding on the EU and by the obligation on the EU to sign up to the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms.

Judicial cooperation in civil matters

01-02-2017

Free movement of goods, services, capital and people is constantly on the increase. This necessarily leads to the development of cross-border relations, which create a need to build bridges between the different legal systems. In civil matters having cross-border implications, the European Union is developing judicial cooperation. Its main objectives are legal certainty and easy and effective access to justice, implying identification of the competent jurisdiction, clear designation of the applicable ...

Free movement of goods, services, capital and people is constantly on the increase. This necessarily leads to the development of cross-border relations, which create a need to build bridges between the different legal systems. In civil matters having cross-border implications, the European Union is developing judicial cooperation. Its main objectives are legal certainty and easy and effective access to justice, implying identification of the competent jurisdiction, clear designation of the applicable law and speedy and effective recognition and enforcement procedures. The EU may act solely through approximation of the laws and regulations of the Member States, not through harmonisation.

Judicial cooperation in criminal matters

01-02-2017

Nowadays more and more people travel, work, study and live abroad. Crime has become an increasingly sophisticated and international phenomenon. We have to develop a common European criminal justice area, where there is mutual trust and support among national law enforcement authorities. The starting point is respect for one of our most crucial principles: the mutual recognition of judicial decisions in all EU Member States. The Treaty of Lisbon has provided a stronger basis for the development of ...

Nowadays more and more people travel, work, study and live abroad. Crime has become an increasingly sophisticated and international phenomenon. We have to develop a common European criminal justice area, where there is mutual trust and support among national law enforcement authorities. The starting point is respect for one of our most crucial principles: the mutual recognition of judicial decisions in all EU Member States. The Treaty of Lisbon has provided a stronger basis for the development of a criminal justice area, while also stipulating new powers for the European Parliament.

Upcoming events

06-04-2017
Impact of the Panama-Papers on Developing countries
Hearing -
PANA
11-04-2017
Joint hearing on Child Marriages
Hearing -
DROI FEMM
11-04-2017
The Implementation of the Environmental Liability Directive
Hearing -
JURI ENVI

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