999

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Author
Keyword
Date

EYE event - Europe's fight against terror

16-05-2018

11 March 2019 will mark the 15th European Day of Remembrance of Victims of Terrorism, established to commemorate all victims of terror following the 2004 Madrid bombings, which left 191 people dead and around 2 000 injured. Since then, Europe has experienced several waves of terrorism and the European Union's policy response has evolved over the years, starting after 11 September 2001 and reaching cruising speed in 2015. What are the results of more than 15 years of EU counter-terrorism action? Is ...

11 March 2019 will mark the 15th European Day of Remembrance of Victims of Terrorism, established to commemorate all victims of terror following the 2004 Madrid bombings, which left 191 people dead and around 2 000 injured. Since then, Europe has experienced several waves of terrorism and the European Union's policy response has evolved over the years, starting after 11 September 2001 and reaching cruising speed in 2015. What are the results of more than 15 years of EU counter-terrorism action? Is there still room for further progress?

EYE event - Sport without corruption

16-05-2018

Played and watched by billions of people across the globe, sport embodies specific values, such as fair play and respect for the rules. Corruption scandals such as those that have made headlines in recent years, be it in football or athletics, seriously tarnish its image, shaking public trust.

Played and watched by billions of people across the globe, sport embodies specific values, such as fair play and respect for the rules. Corruption scandals such as those that have made headlines in recent years, be it in football or athletics, seriously tarnish its image, shaking public trust.

EYE event - Cyber-attacks: Not just a phantom menace

16-05-2018

Some 96 % of young people (and 70 % of citizens) in Europe use the internet every day. The young communicate, play, shop, learn and work online. While offering a galaxy of opportunities, the digital environment also has a dark side. Cybercrime knows no borders and cyber-attacks can take on various forms, targeting all kinds of things, ranging from our devices and wallets, to our way of life. How can we make our digital society more resilient and our cybersecurity stronger? How does the EU help us ...

Some 96 % of young people (and 70 % of citizens) in Europe use the internet every day. The young communicate, play, shop, learn and work online. While offering a galaxy of opportunities, the digital environment also has a dark side. Cybercrime knows no borders and cyber-attacks can take on various forms, targeting all kinds of things, ranging from our devices and wallets, to our way of life. How can we make our digital society more resilient and our cybersecurity stronger? How does the EU help us reinforce our cyber-preparedness and response?

Migration & asylum: Projects & funding

16-05-2018

Funding instruments in the field of migration and asylum management cover, on the one hand, different EU policy fields, such as enlargement, neighbourhood, development cooperation and common foreign and security policy, as well as, on the other, international projects such as those managed by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) at a more global level. The legal basis of each funding instrument provides for the range of its geographical ...

Funding instruments in the field of migration and asylum management cover, on the one hand, different EU policy fields, such as enlargement, neighbourhood, development cooperation and common foreign and security policy, as well as, on the other, international projects such as those managed by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) at a more global level. The legal basis of each funding instrument provides for the range of its geographical and thematic coverage. In addition, interaction takes place between the different areas covered by the thematic and geographic programmes and other external financing Instruments. The funding landscape changed in 2013 with the new Financial Regulation applicable to the EU budget. This enabled the European Commission to create and administer Union Trust Funds in the field of external action, from 2014: these include multi-donor trust funds for emergency, post-emergency or thematic actions such as the Bêkou and the Madad Fund. The European Parliament welcomed this development in an April 2013 resolution, considering that it would allow the EU to raise the visibility of its external action and to have greater control over the delivery chain of such funds. Following the Valletta Summit in November 2015, an Emergency Trust Fund for stability, to address the root causes of irregular migration and displaced persons in Africa was created. To meet the increased migratory challenges, EU funding for the 2015-2018 period has more than doubled. Moreover, the crisis in Syria and in the neighbouring region led to the creation of different funding instruments, by the EU and the international community. EU agencies active externally are also funded through the EU budget. For the 2015-2018 period contributions for support to such EU agencies and their operations reaches €1.4 billion. Funding is one of the main instruments for EU cooperation with third countries in the area of migration, asylum and borders. This paper aims to map and clarify the different funding instruments established for migration-related projects, financed by the EU as well as by the international community.

Revision of the immigration liaison officers network: Implementation Appraisal

16-05-2018

Preventing irregular migration to the EU is a central component of the EU approach to migration. The posting of immigration liaison officers (ILOs) in third countries by Member States to facilitate contacts with the authorities there is part of a multi-layered framework that combines external and internal policies. Although ILOs are a bilateral instrument used by the Member States, the ambition to create a stronger European dimension to their work led to the adoption, in 2004, of a regulation establishing ...

Preventing irregular migration to the EU is a central component of the EU approach to migration. The posting of immigration liaison officers (ILOs) in third countries by Member States to facilitate contacts with the authorities there is part of a multi-layered framework that combines external and internal policies. Although ILOs are a bilateral instrument used by the Member States, the ambition to create a stronger European dimension to their work led to the adoption, in 2004, of a regulation establishing an EU network of ILOs. The increasing pressure on Member States' immigration systems in recent years has led to new EU policies that impact the work and priorities of ILOs. In particular, the return of irregular migrants is a field in which operational support has been increasingly expected from ILOs. This priority has been accompanied by the creation of new EU actors in the field of return and re-admission, such as Frontex Liaison Officers, European Return Liaison Officers and European Migration Liaison Officers. Parallel to these changes in the area of EU immigration policies, evaluation of the ILOs Network Regulation has showed very mixed results as regards its relevance, coherence, effectiveness, efficiency and EU added value. A European Commission proposal to address these issues was tabled on 16 May 2018.

Recent migration flows to the EU

16-05-2018

This infographic aims to present the latest available data on migrant flows to the EU in the year 2017. It covers the detection of illegal crossings on the EU's external borders, numbers of deaths of migrants on those crossings, the number of asylum applications in EU Member States and their decisions on those applications. Previous editions of this Infographic were issued in September 2015 (PE 565.905), April 2016 (PE 580.893), February 2017 (PE 595.918) and December 2017 (PE 614.604).

This infographic aims to present the latest available data on migrant flows to the EU in the year 2017. It covers the detection of illegal crossings on the EU's external borders, numbers of deaths of migrants on those crossings, the number of asylum applications in EU Member States and their decisions on those applications. Previous editions of this Infographic were issued in September 2015 (PE 565.905), April 2016 (PE 580.893), February 2017 (PE 595.918) and December 2017 (PE 614.604).

Political and Electoral Rights of Non-citizen Residents in Latvia and Estonia: Current Situation and Perspectives

16-05-2018

Persons with undetermined citizenship of Estonia and non-citizens of Latvia (‘respective non-citizen populations’) do not have the right to take part in the elections to the European Parliament. The position of Estonia and Latvia is that their respective non-citizen populations have certain legal links with respective States but that these populations are not their nationals. There are certain differences between persons with undetermined citizenship of Estonia and non-citizens of Latvia, both regarding ...

Persons with undetermined citizenship of Estonia and non-citizens of Latvia (‘respective non-citizen populations’) do not have the right to take part in the elections to the European Parliament. The position of Estonia and Latvia is that their respective non-citizen populations have certain legal links with respective States but that these populations are not their nationals. There are certain differences between persons with undetermined citizenship of Estonia and non-citizens of Latvia, both regarding the formal title of the status and the content of the rights (for example, Estonian non-citizen population can vote in municipal elections). The background to the status of respective non-citizen populations is set by public international law rules on the statehood of Baltic States. The mainstream position is that Baltic States were unlawfully controlled by the Soviet Union until the early 1990s, therefore Soviet-era settlers and their descendants did not have an automatic right to their nationality. There are three ways of conceptualising the legal status of the respective non-citizen populations. The Estonian and Latvian position that they have a special status has been accepted by some States and, by necessary implication, by the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights. Some UN human rights institutions characterise these peoples as stateless. The third reading, suggested by certain legal writers, is that respective non-citizen populations are nationals with limited political rights.

External author

Martins Paparinskis

Naturalization and Citizenship in Latvia and Estonia

16-05-2018

This in-depth analysis, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the PETI Committee, argues that Latvia and Estonia have introduced legal statuses –non-citizenship in Latvian and undetermined citizenship in Estonia – that are unique in the European Union in that they give their holders a status that is not citizenship but that is not statelessness either suggesting that the statuses give far-reaching rights to ...

This in-depth analysis, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the PETI Committee, argues that Latvia and Estonia have introduced legal statuses –non-citizenship in Latvian and undetermined citizenship in Estonia – that are unique in the European Union in that they give their holders a status that is not citizenship but that is not statelessness either suggesting that the statuses give far-reaching rights to their holders while staying short of citizenship. Moreover, the author suggests that debates about the status of non-citizens in Latvia and Aliens in Estonia need to be read against the background of the two states’ history as Soviet republics and political and legal decisions that were taken in the 1990s. She supports that Citizenship has become a very emotional and contested issue in Latvia and Estonia. She goes on to say that Latvia and Estonia bring a key question regarding citizenship to light i.e. the question of the agent of citizenship : who needs to act in issues regarding citizenship and whether it is the state´s task to confer citizenship or is it an individuals’ task to claim it.

External author

Susanne Tonsmann

Democratic Transition and Linguistic Minorities in Estonia and Latvia

16-05-2018

Upon request by the PETI Committee, the Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs commissioned this in-depth analysis on Democratic Transition and Linguistic Minorities in Estonia and Latvia. The writer claims that in order to understand the situation of political representation rights of ethnic and linguistic minorities in Estonia and Latvia it is essential to provide a historical-political framework that contextualizes the presence of such substantial minorities in the ...

Upon request by the PETI Committee, the Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs commissioned this in-depth analysis on Democratic Transition and Linguistic Minorities in Estonia and Latvia. The writer claims that in order to understand the situation of political representation rights of ethnic and linguistic minorities in Estonia and Latvia it is essential to provide a historical-political framework that contextualizes the presence of such substantial minorities in the two countries and justifies the type of relationship existing with the majority of nation holder. He also suggests that from one side, full integration is the goal that needs to be pursued, while at the same time it's important to ensure the cultural and national values of Latvians and Estonians.

External author

Angela DI GREGORIO

GDPR goes live: A modern data protection law

15-05-2018

Aimed at strengthening citizens' rights uniformly while reducing burdens for companies and public entities, the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) applies fully as of 25 May 2018. The long-awaited (and often feared) law is part of a reform package adopted in 2016 to foster trust in a digital age. The recent revelations on misuses of data show how the underlying values of the GDPR standards are essential for democracy.

Aimed at strengthening citizens' rights uniformly while reducing burdens for companies and public entities, the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) applies fully as of 25 May 2018. The long-awaited (and often feared) law is part of a reform package adopted in 2016 to foster trust in a digital age. The recent revelations on misuses of data show how the underlying values of the GDPR standards are essential for democracy.

Upcoming events

04-09-2018
Fiscal stabilization capacity for the Euro area: Latest thinking from the IMF
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25-09-2018
Automation: Putting faces to jobs at risk
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EPRS

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