933

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Author
Keyword
Date

Combating fraud and counterfeiting of non-cash means of payment

08-12-2017

The IA presents the problem of non-cash payment fraud in a coherent and clear manner. The link between the problem (sub-) drivers, specific and general objectives of the proposal is rather straightforward. The objectives could be more specific and time-bound, however, to bring them in line with the SMART criteria. The IA sets out the content of all options in a clear manner. However, the quality of data, analysis and stakeholder consultation leaves an overall poor impression, partly because the combined ...

The IA presents the problem of non-cash payment fraud in a coherent and clear manner. The link between the problem (sub-) drivers, specific and general objectives of the proposal is rather straightforward. The objectives could be more specific and time-bound, however, to bring them in line with the SMART criteria. The IA sets out the content of all options in a clear manner. However, the quality of data, analysis and stakeholder consultation leaves an overall poor impression, partly because the combined IA and evaluation study, which is the external expertise informing the assessment, is not available online and therefore impossible to verify. For instance, according to the IA, the qualitative scores were validated with the focus group participants and external reviewers; however, the results of the validations are not reported in the IA report and only seven stakeholders attended the focus group. Such low attendance is rather surprising, considering that the qualitative assessment was given particular weight when deciding on the preferred option. The IA provides a rather inconsistent synopsis of the three consultation processes and the stakeholders’ contributions are not available online. The IA does not make clear what the stakeholders’ views were on the retained or discarded measures and options. Making the study accessible online could perhaps provide the information needed to understand the logic behind the assessment, the stakeholder consultation and the choice of the preferred option.

External author

-

Mapping the Cost of Non-Europe, 2014-19 - Fourth edition

07-12-2017

This study brings together work in progress on a long-term project to identify and analyse the 'cost of non-Europe' in a number of policy fields. This concept, first pioneered by the European Parliament in the 1980s, is used here to quantify the potential efficiency gains in today's European economy through pursuing a series of policy initiatives recently advocated by Parliament – from a wider and deeper digital single market to more systematic coordination of national and European defence policies ...

This study brings together work in progress on a long-term project to identify and analyse the 'cost of non-Europe' in a number of policy fields. This concept, first pioneered by the European Parliament in the 1980s, is used here to quantify the potential efficiency gains in today's European economy through pursuing a series of policy initiatives recently advocated by Parliament – from a wider and deeper digital single market to more systematic coordination of national and European defence policies or increased cooperation to fight corporate tax avoidance. The benefits are measured principally in additional GDP generated or more rational use of public resources. The latest analysis suggests that the European economy could be boosted by €1.75 trillion per year – or 12 % of EU-28 GDP (2016) – by such measures over time. The study is intended to make a contribution to the on-going discussion about the European Union's policy priorities over the current five-year institutional cycle, running from 2014 to 2019.

Procedural rights and detention conditions

07-12-2017

Despite the significant EU action and cooperation that has taken place, the rights and detention conditions of those suspected of committing a crime and serving a sentence in the Member States continue to fail to live up to international and EU standards. Judicial cooperation within the EU is not yet fully adapted to this reality, it operates in absence of an EU mechanism monitoring Member States' compliance with practical fundamental rights and lacks specific guidance for alleged violations. EU ...

Despite the significant EU action and cooperation that has taken place, the rights and detention conditions of those suspected of committing a crime and serving a sentence in the Member States continue to fail to live up to international and EU standards. Judicial cooperation within the EU is not yet fully adapted to this reality, it operates in absence of an EU mechanism monitoring Member States' compliance with practical fundamental rights and lacks specific guidance for alleged violations. EU legislation on suspects' rights is limited to setting common minimum standards. Even so, there are already indications of shortcomings concerning key rights to a fair trial, such as the right to interpretation, translation, information and legal assistance during questioning by the police. Furthermore, certain areas have not been comprehensively addressed, such as pre-trial detention, contributing to prison overcrowding in a number of EU Member States. The outstanding divergent levels of protection also create discrimination between EU citizens. Criminal justice systems remain inefficient and fail to achieve the aims of convicting and rehabilitating the guilty, while protecting the innocent. This impacts on the individuals concerned, in terms of a denial of their rights and material and immaterial damage; on their families; and on Member States' societies more generally. The gaps and barriers identified also have substantial cost implications. Finally, this study assesses the added value of a number of options for EU action and cooperation to contribute to closing these gaps and taking further steps to ensure the effective protection of the rights of suspects and detained persons.

Women in CSDP missions

06-12-2017

Promoting women’s participation in CSDP missions and operations is important to sustain EU’s credibility, to improve effectiveness, to promote equality at home and abroad, to increase the talent pool for personnel, and to make the best use of our financial resources. More needs to be done by both member states and the EU to fulfil promises to implement the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security. This report looks at three issues that contribute to more inclusion ...

Promoting women’s participation in CSDP missions and operations is important to sustain EU’s credibility, to improve effectiveness, to promote equality at home and abroad, to increase the talent pool for personnel, and to make the best use of our financial resources. More needs to be done by both member states and the EU to fulfil promises to implement the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security. This report looks at three issues that contribute to more inclusion and better effectiveness: First, the structures that promote equality in the security sector institutions within the EU; second, the effects of women’s participation in missions and operations; third, how CSDP structures and EU member states policies could be further adapted to create a working environment that is conducive to both men and women contributing their full potential to better solutions to security challenges. Political commitment and hands-on leadership by the EU and its Member States is key to more diversity and inclusivity in CSDP structures. A pro-active approach to recruitment and retention of female staff, adapted job-descriptions, comprehensive family policies, and employing an approach that values diversity and creates a positive work environment are all necessary in this regard.

External author

WIIS, Women in International Security Brussels, Belgium

Combating sexual abuse of children

05-12-2017

Directive 2011/93/EU on combating the sexual abuse and sexual exploitation of children and child pornography, adopted in December 2011, establishes minimum standards for the definition of, and sanctions for, such criminal offences, as well as provisions to strengthen the prevention of those crimes and the protection of victims. During the December plenary session, the Parliament is due to debate a report on the implementation of the directive.

Directive 2011/93/EU on combating the sexual abuse and sexual exploitation of children and child pornography, adopted in December 2011, establishes minimum standards for the definition of, and sanctions for, such criminal offences, as well as provisions to strengthen the prevention of those crimes and the protection of victims. During the December plenary session, the Parliament is due to debate a report on the implementation of the directive.

A Europe for mobile and international families

30-11-2017

As an EU citizen, you can freely move around the EU with your partner and/or children. The EU has clear rules on which national court has jurisdiction in international divorce and parental responsibility cases. The European Parliament supports amicable solutions through mediation in cross-border family disputes, including parental child abductions.

As an EU citizen, you can freely move around the EU with your partner and/or children. The EU has clear rules on which national court has jurisdiction in international divorce and parental responsibility cases. The European Parliament supports amicable solutions through mediation in cross-border family disputes, including parental child abductions.

Implementation appraisals following the Commission Work Programme 2018

29-11-2017

This briefing is intended as a background overview for parliamentary committees planning their activities in relation to the European Commission's work programme 2018 (CWP). It gives (i) a brief description of the content of the work programme, and (ii) an explanation of what committees can expect in terms of implementation appraisals in the next few months from the Ex-Post Evaluation Unit in the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS). Implementation appraisals are pro-active briefings providing ...

This briefing is intended as a background overview for parliamentary committees planning their activities in relation to the European Commission's work programme 2018 (CWP). It gives (i) a brief description of the content of the work programme, and (ii) an explanation of what committees can expect in terms of implementation appraisals in the next few months from the Ex-Post Evaluation Unit in the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS). Implementation appraisals are pro-active briefings providing a succinct overview of publicly available material on the implementation, application and effectiveness to date of an EU law, drawing on input from EU institutions and bodies, as well as external organisations.

Evaluation in the European Commission - Rolling Check-List and State of Play

29-11-2017

This paper aims to provide an overview of planned and ongoing evaluations of EU legislation and spending programmes carried out by each European Commission directorate-general (DG). The general overview and state of play on the public availability of evaluations is completed by a rolling check-list comprising on-going and planned evaluations on the basis of information disclosed by the Commission in various sources (DGs' management plans and annual activity reports, the Single Evaluation Plans for ...

This paper aims to provide an overview of planned and ongoing evaluations of EU legislation and spending programmes carried out by each European Commission directorate-general (DG). The general overview and state of play on the public availability of evaluations is completed by a rolling check-list comprising on-going and planned evaluations on the basis of information disclosed by the Commission in various sources (DGs' management plans and annual activity reports, the Single Evaluation Plans for 2016 and 2017, roadmaps published since July 2015) and the information available in individual DGs. The annexes to this paper contain an overview of, and links to, the DGs' management plans for 2017 (Annex I); and a list of, and direct links to, the evaluations published between 2015 and 20 October 2017 in various sources (Annexes II and III). Finally, Annex IV covers the Commission staff working documents related to evaluation published on EUR-Lex and in the Register of Commission Documents up to October 2017.

Council Framework Decision 2001/413 on combating fraud and counterfeiting of non-cash means of payment

27-11-2017

Council Framework Decision 2001/413 (CFD) on combating fraud and counterfeiting of non-cash means of payment establishes minimum rules concerning the definition of criminal offences and sanctions related to fraud and counterfeiting of non-cash means of payment, as well as the mechanisms for cross-border cooperation and exchange of information. Adopted in 2001, the CFD is now 16 years old. Evidence collected through the Commission’s evaluation and stakeholder consultation confirms the existence of ...

Council Framework Decision 2001/413 (CFD) on combating fraud and counterfeiting of non-cash means of payment establishes minimum rules concerning the definition of criminal offences and sanctions related to fraud and counterfeiting of non-cash means of payment, as well as the mechanisms for cross-border cooperation and exchange of information. Adopted in 2001, the CFD is now 16 years old. Evidence collected through the Commission’s evaluation and stakeholder consultation confirms the existence of significant challenges related to the implementation of the CFD. Overall, it appears that the CFD has not caught up with the technological developments of payment instruments, nor with the increasingly advanced techniques of non-cash fraud. Many Member States have in the meantime updated their respective legal frameworks individually in an effort to respond to these developments. This has resulted in a patchwork of different frameworks within the EU. It has also potentially opened the door to 'forum shopping' (i.e. criminals exploiting the system by moving to those Member States that have more lenient sanctions). The challenges identified include outdated/incomplete definitions, different levels of penalties in Member States, differences in criminalisation of preparatory acts in Member States, difficulties in allocating jurisdiction, under-reporting to law enforcement bodies, etc. The Commission evaluation finds that ‘[a]s a whole, the [CFD] does not appear to have fully met its objectives.’ In the light of the above, in September 2017, the European Commission put forward a proposal for a new directive that would replace the CFD.

Brexit and Ireland – Legal, political and economic considerations

22-11-2017

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament's Policy Department for Citizens' Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the AFCO Committee, describes the legal, political and economic relations of the two parts of Ireland and the United Kingdom, and possible arrangements for dealing with "Brexit". The paper discusses several specific issues, in particular the Common Travel Area between Ireland and the United Kingdom, the consequences of an "invisible" border between the two parts ...

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament's Policy Department for Citizens' Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the AFCO Committee, describes the legal, political and economic relations of the two parts of Ireland and the United Kingdom, and possible arrangements for dealing with "Brexit". The paper discusses several specific issues, in particular the Common Travel Area between Ireland and the United Kingdom, the consequences of an "invisible" border between the two parts of Ireland, and trade in agricultural products.

External author

John TEMPLE LANG

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