475

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Policy area
Author
Keyword
Date

European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom) - Structures and tools

08-09-2017

Euratom was created in 1957 to further European integration and tackle energy shortages through the peaceful use of nuclear power. It has the same members as the European Union and is governed by the Commission and Council, operating under the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice. Euratom regulates the European civil nuclear industry, which produces almost 30 % of energy in the EU. Euratom's work safeguards nuclear materials and technology, facilitates investment, research and development ...

Euratom was created in 1957 to further European integration and tackle energy shortages through the peaceful use of nuclear power. It has the same members as the European Union and is governed by the Commission and Council, operating under the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice. Euratom regulates the European civil nuclear industry, which produces almost 30 % of energy in the EU. Euratom's work safeguards nuclear materials and technology, facilitates investment, research and development, and ensures equal access to nuclear supplies, as well as the correct disposal of nuclear waste and the safety of operations. Its main instruments are the Euratom Supply Agency, and its research and nuclear safeguard activities. Notably, Euratom is involved in developing atomic fusion technology which has the potential of delivering abundant sustainable energy in the future. In March 2017, the United Kingdom officially notified the EU of its intention to withdraw from the Union and the Euratom Community. In the context of the negotiations which commenced in June 2017, the Commission has published a position paper outlining the main principles of the EU position concerning Euratom. Possible impacts on both Euratom and the UK nuclear industry are yet to be determined.

WIFI4EU - Promotion of internet connectivity in local communities

05-09-2017

The European Commission has launched an initiative aimed at providing free access to fast internet in local communities. The European Parliament is due to discuss and vote on WIFI4EU during its September plenary.

The European Commission has launched an initiative aimed at providing free access to fast internet in local communities. The European Parliament is due to discuss and vote on WIFI4EU during its September plenary.

Single digital gateway

05-09-2017

As part of the ‘compliance package’, the Commission intends to provide a single digital entry point to offer easy and efficient online access for businesses and citizens, comprising: (1) information about Union and national law and administrative requirements, (2) procedures, such as company registration, and (3) services providing assistance upon request. The portal would serve start-ups and growing companies, as well as helping companies conducting business in another country. Access to these services ...

As part of the ‘compliance package’, the Commission intends to provide a single digital entry point to offer easy and efficient online access for businesses and citizens, comprising: (1) information about Union and national law and administrative requirements, (2) procedures, such as company registration, and (3) services providing assistance upon request. The portal would serve start-ups and growing companies, as well as helping companies conducting business in another country. Access to these services would be non-discriminatory, i.e. citizens and businesses from other Member States would have full access to the information and services, and this not only in the language used in the country in which they want to do business. The proposal builds on several existing schemes, such as single points of entry at national level; these cover only a few fields, are not always interconnected, suffer from being little known and are therefore underutilised. The idea is part of a wider Commission plan to digitise public administration and increase the effectiveness of the internal market.

EU strategy on cooperative intelligent transport systems

31-08-2017

Digital technologies, and systems based on them, are being rapidly introduced in transport all over the world. Cooperative intelligent transport systems (C-ITS) in road transport are part of this development, and one element in a wider drive towards vehicle automation. These systems use technologies allowing road vehicles to communicate with other vehicles or road users and roadside infrastructure. By increasing the quality and reliability of information, C-ITS can improve road safety and traffic ...

Digital technologies, and systems based on them, are being rapidly introduced in transport all over the world. Cooperative intelligent transport systems (C-ITS) in road transport are part of this development, and one element in a wider drive towards vehicle automation. These systems use technologies allowing road vehicles to communicate with other vehicles or road users and roadside infrastructure. By increasing the quality and reliability of information, C-ITS can improve road safety and traffic efficiency as well as reduce energy consumption and emissions from transport, provided that cyber security and data protection are ensured. The European Commission has put forward a strategy outlining the path towards commercial deployment of C-ITS in the EU by 2019, seeking to avoid market fragmentation and maintain EU competitiveness. The main steps proposed are to adopt a legal framework for providing investors with legal certainty, to make EU funding available for projects, and to continue cooperation with EU stakeholders and international partners. The strategy addresses key issues such as data protection and cyber-security, systems interoperability and technical specifications. In the meantime, several ongoing pilot projects are consolidating the experience to be shared. The European Parliament, a long-time supporter of C-ITS and defender of personal data protection, is preparing a report on the strategy.

European Chemicals Agency: Role and governance

29-08-2017

The European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) is a decentralised agency of the European Union. Established in 2007, it is based in Helsinki. Its main mission is to contribute to the implementation of European chemicals legislation for the benefit of human health and the environment, as well as improving innovation and competitiveness. ECHA carries out technical, scientific and administrative tasks under four EU regulations: the regulation on registration, evaluation, authorisation and restriction of chemicals ...

The European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) is a decentralised agency of the European Union. Established in 2007, it is based in Helsinki. Its main mission is to contribute to the implementation of European chemicals legislation for the benefit of human health and the environment, as well as improving innovation and competitiveness. ECHA carries out technical, scientific and administrative tasks under four EU regulations: the regulation on registration, evaluation, authorisation and restriction of chemicals (REACH); the Classification, Labelling and Packaging (CLP) Regulation; the Biocidal Products Regulation; and the regulation on export and import of hazardous chemicals. It may also initiate regulatory processes and take limited regulatory decisions under these regulations. ECHA comprises a number of bodies active on specific aspects. These include the Member State Committee which is involved in key processes under REACH, three advisory scientific bodies (Committee for Risk Assessment, Committee for Socio-economic analysis and Biocidal Products Committee), a Forum aimed at strengthening enforcement, a Board of Appeal deciding on appeals against decisions taken by the ECHA, and a Management Board, which acts as the Agency's governing body. These bodies are supported by a secretariat employing 564 staff at the end of 2016. ECHA's annual budget, which is about €110 million, has two main sources: a subsidy from the EU budget, and fees levied on companies for services carried out under the four relevant regulations. In 2016, fees and charges accounted for 46 % of expenditure. An evaluation carried out for the European Commission in 2017 found that the ECHA carries out its work effectively and efficiently, is relevant to societal needs and brings EU added value, although the evaluation also highlighted some areas where there is room for improvement, for instance regarding IT and communication.

Ten more technologies which could change our lives

14-07-2017

In 2015, the European Parliament's Directorate-General for Parliamentary Research Services (DG EPRS) broke new ground with its publication 'Ten technologies which could change our lives – potential impacts and policy implications', with each chapter highlighting a particular technology, its promises and potential negative consequences, and the role that the European Parliament could and should play in shaping these developments. This new study continues this work, presenting ten additional technologies ...

In 2015, the European Parliament's Directorate-General for Parliamentary Research Services (DG EPRS) broke new ground with its publication 'Ten technologies which could change our lives – potential impacts and policy implications', with each chapter highlighting a particular technology, its promises and potential negative consequences, and the role that the European Parliament could and should play in shaping these developments. This new study continues this work, presenting ten additional technologies that will increasingly require the attention of policy-makers. The topics for the current study have been chosen to reflect the wide range of topics that the Parliament's Science and Technology Options Assessment (STOA) Panel has decided to focus upon for the eighth parliamentary term (2014-2019). The aim of the publication is not only to draw attention to these ten particular technologies, but also to promote further reflection about other technological developments that may still be at an early stage but that could, in a similar way, massively impact our lives in the short- or longer-term future.

Policy Departments’ Monthly Highlights - July 2017

03-07-2017

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

What if technology helped society become more inclusive?

28-06-2017

There are already many ‘assistive technologies’ available, which can help people with disabilities participate more fully in society. More advanced assistive technologies are under development, but is technology the key to a more inclusive society?

There are already many ‘assistive technologies’ available, which can help people with disabilities participate more fully in society. More advanced assistive technologies are under development, but is technology the key to a more inclusive society?

Motor vehicles: new approval and market surveillance rules

21-06-2017

The automotive industry is a major player in the European economy, accounting for 6.4% of gross domestic product and 2.3 million jobs in the European Union (EU). However, it has been facing difficulties as a result of the economic crisis. In September 2015, the Volkswagen (VW) case highlighted weaknesses in the implementation of type-approval rules for motor vehicles in the European Union, in particular as regards standards on emissions of air pollutants and carbon dioxide. In 2016, as part of preparations ...

The automotive industry is a major player in the European economy, accounting for 6.4% of gross domestic product and 2.3 million jobs in the European Union (EU). However, it has been facing difficulties as a result of the economic crisis. In September 2015, the Volkswagen (VW) case highlighted weaknesses in the implementation of type-approval rules for motor vehicles in the European Union, in particular as regards standards on emissions of air pollutants and carbon dioxide. In 2016, as part of preparations from previous years but also in response to the VW case, the European Commission proposed strengthening the type-approval system for motor vehicles. Its goal is to ensure effective enforcement of rules (including through market surveillance), to strengthen the quality and independence of technical tests and to introduce EU oversight on the type-approval process. Fifth edition. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

Study in focus: Review of EU-third country cooperation on policies falling within the ITRE domain in relation to Brexit

15-06-2017

The study provides a critical assessment of the implications of existing models of cooperation of third countries with the European Union in each of four thematic areas for which the ITRE is responsible (energy, electronic communications, research policy, and small business policy). This briefing provides short summary of this study. Link to the original publication: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/STUD/2017/602057/IPOL_STU(2017)602057_EN.pdf

The study provides a critical assessment of the implications of existing models of cooperation of third countries with the European Union in each of four thematic areas for which the ITRE is responsible (energy, electronic communications, research policy, and small business policy). This briefing provides short summary of this study. Link to the original publication: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/STUD/2017/602057/IPOL_STU(2017)602057_EN.pdf

External author

J. Scott MARCUS, Georgios PETROPOULOS, André SAPIR, Simone TAGLIAPIETRA, Alessio TERZI, Reinhilde VEUGELERS, Georg ZACHMANN

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25-09-2017
Policy Hub | EU policy on the ICC and combating extreme nationalism
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25-09-2017
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