603

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Author
Keyword
Date

EU certification of aviation security screening equipment

24-03-2017

On 7 September 2016, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation establishing a certification system for aviation security screening equipment. The proposal seeks 'to contribute to the proper functioning of the EU internal market and to increase the global competitiveness of the EU industry by establishing an EU certification system for aviation security equipment'. This system would be based on EU type-approval and issuance of a certificate of conformity by manufacturers, which would ...

On 7 September 2016, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation establishing a certification system for aviation security screening equipment. The proposal seeks 'to contribute to the proper functioning of the EU internal market and to increase the global competitiveness of the EU industry by establishing an EU certification system for aviation security equipment'. This system would be based on EU type-approval and issuance of a certificate of conformity by manufacturers, which would be valid in all Member States, according to the principle of mutual recognition. The proposal falls under different policy frameworks: the 2012 Commission communication entitled 'Security Industrial Policy Action Plan for an innovative and competitive Security Industry', the European agenda on security adopted by the Commission in April 2015, and the communication 'Delivering the European Agenda on Security to fight against terrorism and pave the way towards an effective and genuine Security Union', adopted in April 2016. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

Understanding social dumping in the European Union

21-03-2017

Although a recurring term in discussions related to working mobility, wages and the social security of workers, social dumping has neither a generally accepted definition, nor easily definable limits. It is rather a set of practices on an international, national or inter-corporate level, aimed at gaining an advantage over competitors, which could have important negative consequences on economic processes and workers’ social security. Examples include actions taken by actors from 'low wage' Member ...

Although a recurring term in discussions related to working mobility, wages and the social security of workers, social dumping has neither a generally accepted definition, nor easily definable limits. It is rather a set of practices on an international, national or inter-corporate level, aimed at gaining an advantage over competitors, which could have important negative consequences on economic processes and workers’ social security. Examples include actions taken by actors from 'low wage' Member States to gain market advantage over actors from Member States with higher pay and social standards; multinational companies from 'high wage' countries searching for ways to avoid legal constraints by employing subcontractors from low-wage countries; and companies engaging cheaper and more vulnerable temporary and agency workers, or relocating production to lower wage and less regulated locations. Social dumping takes different forms in different sectors. Suppressing social dumping is a component of different regulations on working mobility, undeclared work, and the status of transport workers. However, as the legislative competence of the European Union is limited in the labour law domain, soft law and social dialogue are also used to tackle the phenomenon. Several cases before the Court of Justice of the EU (such as the Viking and the Laval cases) show that the applicable EU rules can only be effective if adequate implementation and enforcement by the Member States is guaranteed. In September 2016, the European Parliament adopted an own-initiative resolution on social dumping, calling for a number of actions to reinforce controls, close regulatory gaps, revise working conditions and promote social convergence.

Hybrid mismatches with third countries

21-03-2017

Hybrid mismatch is a situation where a cross-border activity is treated differently for tax purposes by the countries involved, resulting in favourable tax treatment. Hybrid mismatches are used as aggressive tax planning structures, which in turn trigger policy reactions to neutralise their tax effects. When adopting the Anti-Tax Avoidance Directive in July 2016, the Council requested that the Commission put forward a proposal on hybrid mismatches involving third countries. The amendment proposed ...

Hybrid mismatch is a situation where a cross-border activity is treated differently for tax purposes by the countries involved, resulting in favourable tax treatment. Hybrid mismatches are used as aggressive tax planning structures, which in turn trigger policy reactions to neutralise their tax effects. When adopting the Anti-Tax Avoidance Directive in July 2016, the Council requested that the Commission put forward a proposal on hybrid mismatches involving third countries. The amendment proposed by the Commission on 25 October broadens the provisions of the directive accordingly. It seeks to neutralise mismatches by obliging Member States to deny the deduction of payments by taxpayers or by requiring taxpayers to include a payment or a profit in their taxable income. As this is a tax measure, Parliament is consulted only, and the proposal will be adopted by the Council. The Economic and Monetary Affairs Committee is preparing Parliament's opinion.

Outcome of European Council meeting of 9 March 2017 and of informal meeting of the EU27 of 10 March 2017

14-03-2017

After re-electing Donald Tusk as its President, the European Council meeting of 9 March 2017 discussed the economic situation in Europe, progress on measures regarding migration, internal and external security, and external relations. In his first speech to the European Council, the recently- elected President of the European Parliament, Antonio Tajani, outlined his approach to appearing before European Council meetings, he will present the positions of the European Parliament, including minority ...

After re-electing Donald Tusk as its President, the European Council meeting of 9 March 2017 discussed the economic situation in Europe, progress on measures regarding migration, internal and external security, and external relations. In his first speech to the European Council, the recently- elected President of the European Parliament, Antonio Tajani, outlined his approach to appearing before European Council meetings, he will present the positions of the European Parliament, including minority views. He stressed his commitment to ‘fair and constructive cooperation’ between the two institutions, stating that ‘Parliament will be part of the solution, not part of the problem’. In the end, the meeting produced ‘Conclusions by the President of the European Council supported by 27 Member States, ’ due to a lack of consensus ‘for reasons unrelated to its [i.e. the documents] substance’. At the informal meeting of the 27 Heads of State or Government without the UK (EU27), held the following day, leaders discussed the procedural and content-related aspects of the forthcoming celebrations of the 60th anniversary of the Rome Treaties and the expected ‘Rome Declaration’.

Revision of the Firearms Directive

10-03-2017

A week after the Paris terrorist attack in November 2015, the European Commission adopted a proposal to amend the directive on control of the acquisition and possession of weapons. The changes aim to introduce tighter controls on civilian use of firearms, improve traceability of legally held weapons and strengthen cooperation between Member States. Several rounds of trilogue negotiations produced an initial agreement in December 2016, now awaiting a vote in plenary.

A week after the Paris terrorist attack in November 2015, the European Commission adopted a proposal to amend the directive on control of the acquisition and possession of weapons. The changes aim to introduce tighter controls on civilian use of firearms, improve traceability of legally held weapons and strengthen cooperation between Member States. Several rounds of trilogue negotiations produced an initial agreement in December 2016, now awaiting a vote in plenary.

European Council Conclusions: A Rolling Check-List of Commitments to Date (11th edition)

10-03-2017

The European Council's role - to 'provide the Union with the necessary impetus for its development' and to define its 'general political directions and priorities' - has developed rapidly over the past seven years. Since June 2014, the European Council Oversight Unit within the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS), the European Parliament's in-house research service and think-tank, has been monitoring and analysing the European Council's delivery of the various commitments made in the conclusions ...

The European Council's role - to 'provide the Union with the necessary impetus for its development' and to define its 'general political directions and priorities' - has developed rapidly over the past seven years. Since June 2014, the European Council Oversight Unit within the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS), the European Parliament's in-house research service and think-tank, has been monitoring and analysing the European Council's delivery of the various commitments made in the conclusions of its meetings. This overview, presented in the form of a regularly updated Rolling Check-List of Commitments to Date, is designed to review the degree of progress in realising the goals which the European Council has set itself since January 2010 and to assist the Parliament in exercising its important oversight role in this field.

Review Clauses in EU Legislation: A Rolling Check-List (5th edition)

10-03-2017

This check-list presents a comprehensive overview of ‘review clauses’, that is to say, review, evaluation and reporting provisions contained in recent EU legislative acts and programmes. It is produced by the Policy Cycle Unit of the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS), the EP's in-house research service and think- tank, with a view to supporting parliamentary committees in monitoring the evaluation of EU law, policies and programmes, thus feeding the ex-post analysis into the ex-ante ...

This check-list presents a comprehensive overview of ‘review clauses’, that is to say, review, evaluation and reporting provisions contained in recent EU legislative acts and programmes. It is produced by the Policy Cycle Unit of the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS), the EP's in-house research service and think- tank, with a view to supporting parliamentary committees in monitoring the evaluation of EU law, policies and programmes, thus feeding the ex-post analysis into the ex-ante phase of the policy cycle. The European Parliament is strongly committed to the concept of better law-making, and particularly to the effective use of ex-ante impact assessment and ex-post evaluation throughout the whole legislative cycle. It is in this spirit that Parliament shows a particular interest in following the transposition, implementation and enforcement of EU law and EU programmes and, more generally, monitoring the impact, operation, effectiveness and delivery of policy and programmes in practice.

Special Reports of the European Court of Auditors: A Rolling Check-List of recent findings

10-03-2017

This rolling check-list presents a comprehensive overview of the European Court of Auditors' (ECA) special reports, concentrating on those relevant for the 2015 EU discharge procedure. The document seeks to link the topics discussed by the special reports to the relevant debates and positions within the European Parliament, including notably the working documents of the Budgetary Control Committee, to the work of the various specialised parliamentary committees, and to individual Members' questions ...

This rolling check-list presents a comprehensive overview of the European Court of Auditors' (ECA) special reports, concentrating on those relevant for the 2015 EU discharge procedure. The document seeks to link the topics discussed by the special reports to the relevant debates and positions within the European Parliament, including notably the working documents of the Budgetary Control Committee, to the work of the various specialised parliamentary committees, and to individual Members' questions. It is produced by the Policy Cycle Unit of the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS), the Parliament's in-house research service and think-tank, as part of its on-going support for parliamentary committees and individual Members, helping them to scrutinise the executive in its implementation of EU law, policies and programmes. The European Parliament is strongly committed to the concept of better law-making, and particularly to the effective use of ex-ante impact assessment and ex-post evaluation throughout the whole legislative cycle. It is in this spirit that the Parliament has a particular interest in following the transposition, implementation and enforcement of EU law, and, more generally, in monitoring the impact, operation, effectiveness and delivery of policy and programmes in practice.

CE marked fertilising products

07-03-2017

Fertilising products are used to improve plant growth, mainly in agriculture, enabling higher crop yields. However, they are associated with some challenges as regards security of supply, the environment and health. Although the 2003 Fertilisers Regulation, which aimed at ensuring an internal market in fertilisers, has been effective, it mainly addresses mineral fertilisers and deters the introduction of new types of fertilisers. In March 2016, the Commission put forward a legislative proposal on ...

Fertilising products are used to improve plant growth, mainly in agriculture, enabling higher crop yields. However, they are associated with some challenges as regards security of supply, the environment and health. Although the 2003 Fertilisers Regulation, which aimed at ensuring an internal market in fertilisers, has been effective, it mainly addresses mineral fertilisers and deters the introduction of new types of fertilisers. In March 2016, the Commission put forward a legislative proposal on fertilising products, as announced in the circular economy action plan. The proposal modernises the conformity assessment and market surveillance in line with the ‘new legislative framework’ for product legislation, covers a wider range of fertilising products (including those manufactured from secondary raw materials), and sets limits for the presence of heavy metals and contaminants in fertilising products. Stakeholders’ reactions have been mixed. In the European Parliament, the proposal is being considered by the Internal Market and Consumer Protection (IMCO) Committee. Two further committees are associated: Environment and Public Health (ENVI) and Agriculture and Rural Development (AGRI). The International Trade Committee (INTA) is also to prepare an opinion.

The liberalisation of EU port services

06-03-2017

Serving as access points to Europe, the European Union's approximately 1 200 seaports are crucial both for its transport sector and its competitiveness. They also have significant potential for creating jobs and attracting investors. The European Commission plans to redress the huge disparities in performance levels by modernising the port services offered by the EU’s 329 main seaports. The reform is aimed at eliminating unfair competition, guaranteeing a level playing field and improving the commercial ...

Serving as access points to Europe, the European Union's approximately 1 200 seaports are crucial both for its transport sector and its competitiveness. They also have significant potential for creating jobs and attracting investors. The European Commission plans to redress the huge disparities in performance levels by modernising the port services offered by the EU’s 329 main seaports. The reform is aimed at eliminating unfair competition, guaranteeing a level playing field and improving the commercial efficiency of ports. Two previous attempts to liberalise port services (in 2001 and 2004) provoked controversy, particularly regarding their social/labour market aspects, and were rejected by the European Parliament. The latest initiative combines a legislative and a 'soft' approach. The previously contentious cargo handling and passenger services will not be opened up to the market through legislation. Instead, the Commission is focusing on establishing a clear framework for market access to port services and common rules on the transparency of public funding for ports and the charges for users. The 'soft' approach comprises an action plan and the launch of sectoral social dialogue. This briefing updates an earlier edition, of 6 December 2016, PE 595.829.

Upcoming events

28-03-2017
60th anniversary of the Rome Treaties and 25th anniversary of the Maastricht Treaty
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28-03-2017
The Future of Science through Citizens Engagement
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STOA
12-04-2017
Workshop: Implementation of the EU arms export control system
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SEDE

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