625

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Word(s)
Publication type
Author
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Date

Body of European Regulators for Electronic Communications (BEREC)

23-06-2017

On 14 September 2016, the European Commission proposed an updated regulation on the Body of European Regulators of Electronic Communications (BEREC) as part of its wider telecoms package. The new proposal aims at transforming BEREC into a single fully fledged agency. The Commission proposes allocating new tasks to BEREC and granting it legally binding powers. New tasks include providing guidelines for national regulatory authorities (NRAs) on geographical surveys, developing common approaches to ...

On 14 September 2016, the European Commission proposed an updated regulation on the Body of European Regulators of Electronic Communications (BEREC) as part of its wider telecoms package. The new proposal aims at transforming BEREC into a single fully fledged agency. The Commission proposes allocating new tasks to BEREC and granting it legally binding powers. New tasks include providing guidelines for national regulatory authorities (NRAs) on geographical surveys, developing common approaches to meet end-user interests, but also developing common approaches to deliver peer-reviewed opinions on draft national measures (e.g. radio spectrum assignments) and on cross-border disputes. Stakeholders have been divided over the Commission’s review as regards the effectiveness and powers of BEREC. While the role of NRAs is widely acknowledged, some stakeholders stressed that the institutional set-up at EU and BEREC levels should be adjusted (e.g. a clearer division of powers, accountability issues, transparency in decision-making). Second edition The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

Control of the acquisition and possession of weapons

23-06-2017

In the aftermath of the Paris terrorist attacks, in November 2015 the European Commission presented a package of measures aiming to tighten control on the acquisition and possession of firearms in the European Union, improve traceability of legally held firearms and enhance cooperation between Member States, as well as ensure that deactivated firearms are rendered inoperable. The proposal to amend the current 'Firearms Directive' (Directive 91/477/EEC) was part of this package. It aimed to ban some ...

In the aftermath of the Paris terrorist attacks, in November 2015 the European Commission presented a package of measures aiming to tighten control on the acquisition and possession of firearms in the European Union, improve traceability of legally held firearms and enhance cooperation between Member States, as well as ensure that deactivated firearms are rendered inoperable. The proposal to amend the current 'Firearms Directive' (Directive 91/477/EEC) was part of this package. It aimed to ban some semi-automatic firearms for civilian use, as well as to include some previously excluded actors (collectors and brokers) and blank-firing weapons within the scope of the Directive. Parliament and Council reached agreement on the proposal in December, and formally adopted it in March and April respectively. The new directive reduces the number of weapons categories and changes the classification of certain types of weapons, while strictly defining exceptions for civilian use of the most dangerous weapons. It entered into force on 13 June 2017, with the deadline for transposition of most provisions set at 14 September 2018. This updates a briefing of January 2017, drafted by Jana Valant: PE 595.875.

Dual quality of branded food products: Addressing a possible east-west divide

20-06-2017

Recent tests on branded food in three 'new' EU Member States have shown that the taste and composition of these products, sold under the same name and in the same packaging, sometimes differ from the 'same' products sold in neighbouring 'old' Member States. While the ingredients were generally properly labelled and the products were considered safe for consumption, some of those in 'new' Member States were considered to be of inferior quality and less healthy, and were also more expensive. Similar ...

Recent tests on branded food in three 'new' EU Member States have shown that the taste and composition of these products, sold under the same name and in the same packaging, sometimes differ from the 'same' products sold in neighbouring 'old' Member States. While the ingredients were generally properly labelled and the products were considered safe for consumption, some of those in 'new' Member States were considered to be of inferior quality and less healthy, and were also more expensive. Similar claims have previously been made concerning cosmetics and laundry detergents. Companies are known to change the composition of their branded products to adjust to local taste, local ingredients, divergent purchasing power, etc. EU legislation does not consider this to be misleading, as long as the products are safe, properly labelled and not falsely advertised as being identical to those sold in another Member State. At the same time, trademark law, while protecting the right of the trademark owner to communicate the origin and quality of products by using a mark, does not offer the consumer a legally enforceable guarantee. In 2013 the European Parliament asked the Commission to look into the matter, and in 2017 a group of MEPs issued a major interpellation asking the Commission to make proposals to amend EU legislation in connection with the 'dual quality' of products. The Commission has so far been reluctant to take this path, preferring to address the issue in the High-Level Forum for a better functioning food supply chain.

European Council Conclusions: A Rolling Check-List of Commitments to Date (12th edition)

20-06-2017

The European Council's role – to 'provide the Union with the necessary impetus for its development' and to define its 'general political directions and priorities' - has developed rapidly over the past seven years. Since June 2014, the European Council Oversight Unit within the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS), the European Parliament's in-house research service and think-tank, has been monitoring and analysing the European Council's delivery of the various commitments made in the conclusions ...

The European Council's role – to 'provide the Union with the necessary impetus for its development' and to define its 'general political directions and priorities' - has developed rapidly over the past seven years. Since June 2014, the European Council Oversight Unit within the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS), the European Parliament's in-house research service and think-tank, has been monitoring and analysing the European Council's delivery of the various commitments made in the conclusions of its meetings. This overview, presented in the form of a regularly updated Rolling Check-List of Commitments to Date, is designed to review the degree of progress in realising the goals which the European Council has set itself since January 2010 and to assist the Parliament in exercising its important oversight role in this field.

Mutual Recognition Regulation

13-06-2017

The internal market for goods is one of the EU’s greatest achievements at European level, as well as one of its most important and continuing priorities. Despite its undeniable success, the single market has yet to reach its full potential, and barriers to free exchange of goods continue to limit opportunities for businesses and citizens. Since 2009, Regulation EC 764/2008, also known as the Mutual Recognition Regulation, has strengthened the free trade of goods within the EU. This regulation requires ...

The internal market for goods is one of the EU’s greatest achievements at European level, as well as one of its most important and continuing priorities. Despite its undeniable success, the single market has yet to reach its full potential, and barriers to free exchange of goods continue to limit opportunities for businesses and citizens. Since 2009, Regulation EC 764/2008, also known as the Mutual Recognition Regulation, has strengthened the free trade of goods within the EU. This regulation requires that all Member States provide information on their national technical rules for products lawfully marketed in another Member State and sets out a standard procedure for enforcing these rules. The European Commission is now preparing new measures aimed at improving this regulation and making it easier for businesses to market their products in another EU country. This briefing highlights some key elements of the single market for goods and focuses on the revision of Regulation EC 764/2008.

European Accessibility Act

09-06-2017

To ensure the full participation of people with disabilities in society and to reduce the fragmentation of legislation governing access to products and services, the European Commission has adopted a proposal for a directive – often referred to as the European Accessibility Act. This proposal provides for a common EU definition of and implementation framework for accessibility requirements for certain products and services. It also aims to use the same accessibility requirements to provide a clear ...

To ensure the full participation of people with disabilities in society and to reduce the fragmentation of legislation governing access to products and services, the European Commission has adopted a proposal for a directive – often referred to as the European Accessibility Act. This proposal provides for a common EU definition of and implementation framework for accessibility requirements for certain products and services. It also aims to use the same accessibility requirements to provide a clear definition of the existing general accessibility obligation laid down in European law. Many stakeholders welcome the European Union's wish to honour its responsibilities under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, but they have been divided on the means to reach this objective. Discussion is on-going on the proposal: the Council adopted progress reports in June and December 2016, and work continues in the Working Party on Social Questions. In the European Parliament, the Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection (IMCO) adopted its report on 25 April 2017.

Free movement of workers

01-06-2017

One of the four freedoms enjoyed by EU citizens is the free movement of workers. This includes the rights of movement and residence for workers, the rights of entry and residence for family members, and the right to work in another Member State and be treated on an equal footing with nationals of that Member State. Restrictions apply in some countries for citizens of new Member States. The rules on access to social benefits are currently shaped primarily by the case law of the Court of Justice.

One of the four freedoms enjoyed by EU citizens is the free movement of workers. This includes the rights of movement and residence for workers, the rights of entry and residence for family members, and the right to work in another Member State and be treated on an equal footing with nationals of that Member State. Restrictions apply in some countries for citizens of new Member States. The rules on access to social benefits are currently shaped primarily by the case law of the Court of Justice.

Freedom of establishment and freedom to provide services

01-06-2017

As stipulated in the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and reinforced by the case-law of the European Court of Justice, the freedom of establishment and the freedom to provide services guarantee mobility of businesses and professionals within the EU. For the further implementation of these two freedoms, expectations concerning the Services Directive adopted in 2006 are high, as it is of crucial importance for the completion of the internal market.

As stipulated in the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and reinforced by the case-law of the European Court of Justice, the freedom of establishment and the freedom to provide services guarantee mobility of businesses and professionals within the EU. For the further implementation of these two freedoms, expectations concerning the Services Directive adopted in 2006 are high, as it is of crucial importance for the completion of the internal market.

The mutual recognition of diplomas

01-06-2017

The freedom of establishment and the freedom to provide services are cornerstones of the single market, enabling the mobility of businesses and professionals throughout the EU. Implementing these freedoms supposes the overall recognition of nationally delivered diplomas and qualifications. Different measures for their harmonisation and mutual recognition have been adopted, and further legislation on the subject is under way.

The freedom of establishment and the freedom to provide services are cornerstones of the single market, enabling the mobility of businesses and professionals throughout the EU. Implementing these freedoms supposes the overall recognition of nationally delivered diplomas and qualifications. Different measures for their harmonisation and mutual recognition have been adopted, and further legislation on the subject is under way.

First pillar of the CAP: I — Common organisation of the markets (CMO) in agricultural products

01-06-2017

The CMO is the framework for the market measures provided for under the CAP. Following a series of reforms, 21 separate CMOs were codified into a single CMO, covering all agricultural products, in 2007. Reforms to the CAP have, in addition, gradually made the policy more market-oriented and scaled down the role of intervention tools, which are now regarded as safety nets to be used only in the event of a crisis.

The CMO is the framework for the market measures provided for under the CAP. Following a series of reforms, 21 separate CMOs were codified into a single CMO, covering all agricultural products, in 2007. Reforms to the CAP have, in addition, gradually made the policy more market-oriented and scaled down the role of intervention tools, which are now regarded as safety nets to be used only in the event of a crisis.

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29-06-2017
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29-06-2017
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