359

result(s)

Word(s)
Publication type
Policy area
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Keyword
Date

Limits on exposure to carcinogens and mutagens at work: Third proposal

12-07-2018

The European Commission has proposed to amend Directive 2004/37/EC by expanding its scope and by including and/or revising occupational exposure limit values for a number of cancer- or mutation-causing substances. The initiative is proceeding in steps. The first proposal of May 2016 covered 13 priority chemical agents, the second, of January 2017, a further seven. The current (third) proposal addresses an additional five. Broad discussions with scientists and the social partners fed into all three ...

The European Commission has proposed to amend Directive 2004/37/EC by expanding its scope and by including and/or revising occupational exposure limit values for a number of cancer- or mutation-causing substances. The initiative is proceeding in steps. The first proposal of May 2016 covered 13 priority chemical agents, the second, of January 2017, a further seven. The current (third) proposal addresses an additional five. Broad discussions with scientists and the social partners fed into all three proposals. Reacting to the Commission's set of measures as a whole, trade unions have acknowledged the importance of further action to improve the existing framework, reiterating the need to reach the target of 50 limit values in 2020, while some considered it necessary to extend the scope of the CMD to substances that are toxic to reproduction. Actors on the employers' side, while in principle supporting further revisions of the directive, have underlined, among other things, the need to ensure that values are proportionate and feasible in terms of technical implementation. While welcoming the Commission proposal, the rapporteur's draft report of 29 June 2018 proposes, inter alia, to grant incentives to businesses that comply with the directive. Moreover, it opts to include, within the scope of the directive, the protection of workers from exposure to hazardous, or harm-causing, medicines (including cytotoxic ones, which are used in the treatment of cancer).

Review Clauses in EU Legislation: A Rolling Check-List (6th edition)

29-06-2018

This study provides an overview of review clauses (reviews, evaluations, implementation reports) contained in EU legislation during the sixth, seventh and the current, eighth parliamentary term. Drawing on information publicly available across several sources, it provides in a single, comprehensive repository an analytical overview of acts that contain a review clause. The study puts a special focus on (and the analysis of) review clauses in EU legislative acts adopted during the current parliamentary ...

This study provides an overview of review clauses (reviews, evaluations, implementation reports) contained in EU legislation during the sixth, seventh and the current, eighth parliamentary term. Drawing on information publicly available across several sources, it provides in a single, comprehensive repository an analytical overview of acts that contain a review clause. The study puts a special focus on (and the analysis of) review clauses in EU legislative acts adopted during the current parliamentary term (with a total of 147 legislative acts with a review clause adopted through the ordinary legislative procedure up until end of December 2017).

Faith-based actors and the implementation of the European Pillar of Social Rights

19-06-2018

The European Pillar of Social Rights was jointly proclaimed and signed by the European Commission, the European Parliament and the Council at the Gothenburg Social Summit in November 2017. The 20 principles and rights that make up the Social Pillar build on the existing social acquis, i.e. social mandate contained in binding provisions of EU law, and should serve as a 'compass' for the renewal of current labour markets and welfare systems across the European Union (EU). Their implementation is largely ...

The European Pillar of Social Rights was jointly proclaimed and signed by the European Commission, the European Parliament and the Council at the Gothenburg Social Summit in November 2017. The 20 principles and rights that make up the Social Pillar build on the existing social acquis, i.e. social mandate contained in binding provisions of EU law, and should serve as a 'compass' for the renewal of current labour markets and welfare systems across the European Union (EU). Their implementation is largely the responsibility of the Member States in cooperation with the social partners and with the support of the European Union. Faith-based organisations are similar to voluntary organisations, i.e. civil society associations, third sector organisations and non-profit organisations. Some are inspired by religious values without being formally linked to religious institutions. They play an important role in addressing social problems, particularly in relation to under-served populations. They often cooperate with secular organisations and contribute to the welfare state. In the EU context, there is no distinction between faith-based and secular organisations, when it comes to policy development, programme implementation or funding. Faith-based organisations have welcomed the Social Pillar and have emphasised in particular the role they could play in its implementation at grassroots level. Not only can they provide services, they can also help to devise strategies and funding schemes by connecting local, national and European actors. There are still a lot of gaps in the evaluation of their activities, however, which makes it difficult to quantify their real contribution to the functioning of the welfare state.

Strengthening EU cooperation on health technology assessment

18-06-2018

The impact assessment (IA) accompanying the Commission proposal on strengthening EU cooperation on Health Technology Assessment clearly defines the problem, as well as the general and specific objectives. However, the IA does not appear to have succeeded in presenting a very convincing range of options. The analysis of impacts focuses on the economic dimension, which is consistent with the manner in which the problems have been defined. In light of the reported concentration of SMEs in the medical ...

The impact assessment (IA) accompanying the Commission proposal on strengthening EU cooperation on Health Technology Assessment clearly defines the problem, as well as the general and specific objectives. However, the IA does not appear to have succeeded in presenting a very convincing range of options. The analysis of impacts focuses on the economic dimension, which is consistent with the manner in which the problems have been defined. In light of the reported concentration of SMEs in the medical technologies sector (95 %), more emphasis could have been put on analysing the impacts of the retained options on them. The stakeholders' views have been illustrated in a satisfactory way. The evidence included or referenced in the IA is copious and up to date. The IA appears to have addressed most of the RSB's recommendations. Finally, the legislative proposal appears to be consistent with the analysis carried out in the IA.

EYE event - I am Doctor Robot. What can I do for you?

16-05-2018

Robotics is moving from the realm of science fiction to palpable reality and, although they are unlikely to replace health professionals any time soon, robots already have many uses in medicine and healthcare. The use and development of robots come with new challenges, some ethical. The European Parliament has taken a stance and asked the European Commission to come up with rules.

Robotics is moving from the realm of science fiction to palpable reality and, although they are unlikely to replace health professionals any time soon, robots already have many uses in medicine and healthcare. The use and development of robots come with new challenges, some ethical. The European Parliament has taken a stance and asked the European Commission to come up with rules.

Research for AGRI Committee - Towards the CAP post 2020 - Appraisal of the EC Communication on ‘The Future of Food and Farming’ of 29 November 2017

15-05-2018

This study assesses the European Commission’s plans for CAP reform as set out in November 2017 and subsequently. It discusses the extent to which those plans address the performance of the CAP against its objectives, compares them with the views and ideas of stakeholders and makes recommendations.

This study assesses the European Commission’s plans for CAP reform as set out in November 2017 and subsequently. It discusses the extent to which those plans address the performance of the CAP against its objectives, compares them with the views and ideas of stakeholders and makes recommendations.

External author

D. Mottershead, K. Hart, A. Maréchal, S. Meredith, A. Lorant, F. Bas-Defossez, D. Baldock (IEEP), J-C. Bureau, A. Matthews

The vulnerability of women migrant workers in agriculture and the EU: the need for a Human Rights and Gender based approach

14-05-2018

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens' Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality, explores the working conditions of migrant women in agriculture in the EU, focusing on some case studies in Italy and Spain. In particular, it aims to examine the factors that render women vulnerable to exploitation, paying attention to gendered dynamics and power relations. The study contends that to prevent ...

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens' Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality, explores the working conditions of migrant women in agriculture in the EU, focusing on some case studies in Italy and Spain. In particular, it aims to examine the factors that render women vulnerable to exploitation, paying attention to gendered dynamics and power relations. The study contends that to prevent and combat exploitation in agriculture it is necessary to implement concerted actions aimed at tackling, from a human rights and gender perspective, the structural factors of a socio-economic system which fosters and relies on workers’ vulnerability.

External author

Dr. Letizia PALUMBO Dr. Alessandra SCIURBA

Health and safety at work

01-05-2018

Improving health and safety at work has been an important issue for the EU since the 1980s. The introduction of legislation at European level set minimum standards for the protection of workers, while allowing Member States to maintain or introduce more stringent measures. When the Lisbon Treaty entered into force, the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union became legally binding, making health and safety policy an even more important area of EU legislation.

Improving health and safety at work has been an important issue for the EU since the 1980s. The introduction of legislation at European level set minimum standards for the protection of workers, while allowing Member States to maintain or introduce more stringent measures. When the Lisbon Treaty entered into force, the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union became legally binding, making health and safety policy an even more important area of EU legislation.

Regulation (EC) 1107/2009 on the Placing of Plant Protection Products on the Market

24-04-2018

Regulation (EC) 1107/2009 lays down the main instruments for placing effective plant protection products (using pesticide substances) on the market that are safe for humans, animals and the environment, while at the same time ensuring effective functioning of the internal market and improved agricultural production. This European Implementation Assessment found that the above objectives, while largely relevant to real needs, are not being achieved in practice. In particular, implementation of the ...

Regulation (EC) 1107/2009 lays down the main instruments for placing effective plant protection products (using pesticide substances) on the market that are safe for humans, animals and the environment, while at the same time ensuring effective functioning of the internal market and improved agricultural production. This European Implementation Assessment found that the above objectives, while largely relevant to real needs, are not being achieved in practice. In particular, implementation of the main instruments of the regulation – substance approval, plant protection products authorisation and enforcement of the regulatory decisions taken in the frame of the approvals and authorisations, is problematic, which also affect other related EU policies. Nevertheless, despite the implementation challenges observed, stakeholders – including national competent authorities, health/environment NGOs, manufacturers of substances and plant protection products and their users (farmers) – agree that the EU is the appropriate level at which regulatory action in the field of pesticides (used in plant protection products) should continue to take place.

External author

Annex I written by Florent PELSY and Lise OULÈS from Milieu Ltd (Belgium) and Evelyn UNDERWOOD (Institute for European Environmental Policy, IEEP). Annex II written by Dr Emanuela BOZZINI (University of Trento, Italy). Annex III written by Dr Olivia HAMLYN (University of Leicester, United Kingdom). Annex IV written by Dr Dovilė RIMKUTĖ (University of Leiden, The Netherlands)

The regions in the digital single market: ICT and digital opportunities for European regions

19-04-2018

The digital economy is growing at seven times the rate of the rest of the economy. The European Commission estimates that completing the digital single market could contribute €415 billion per year to Europe's economy, create 3.8 million jobs and transform public services. In addition, many future jobs will require information and communications technologies (ICT) skills, rendering the process of acquiring digital skills an imperative. The European Commission has presented several initiatives to ...

The digital economy is growing at seven times the rate of the rest of the economy. The European Commission estimates that completing the digital single market could contribute €415 billion per year to Europe's economy, create 3.8 million jobs and transform public services. In addition, many future jobs will require information and communications technologies (ICT) skills, rendering the process of acquiring digital skills an imperative. The European Commission has presented several initiatives to boost the use of ICT in Europe. The Digital Agenda for Europe, announced in 2010 in the framework of the Europe 2020 strategy, aimed at promoting economic recovery and improving social inclusion through a more digitally proficient Europe. The Digital Single Market strategy, introduced in 2015, complements the Digital Agenda for Europe. Achieving a digital single market will ensure that Europe maintains its position as a world leader in the digital economy, helping European companies to grow globally. In 2016, the European Commission adopted a new Skills Agenda for Europe which includes measures on the acquisition of digital skills. Although many of the digital single market priorities are primarily dealt with at national level, various initiatives can be explored at the local and regional level. Regions and cities can plan and pursue their own digital strategies in the interests of enhancing economic growth and to promote their citizens' wellbeing. Enhanced use of digital technologies can improve citizens' access to information and culture, promote open government, equality and non-discrimination. However, a number of challenges need to be addressed to fully reap the benefits of digitalisation. Personnel with ICT skills are still lacking in Europe and many European citizens are not adequately trained to carry out ICT-related tasks. In addition, broadband connectivity in some parts of Europe remains slow. Although certain EU regions and local authorities experiment with new technologies, not all of them have managed to provide a high-level range of digital services and ICT related activities. This briefing is an update of an earlier edition, published in October 2015.

Upcoming events

18-07-2018
Tables rondes à Niamey : Numérique, eau et agriculture, et énergies renouvelables
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BURO EPRS
04-09-2018
Fiscal stabilization capacity for the Euro area: IMF proposals and political reality
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EPRS

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