386

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European high-performance computing joint undertaking

05-02-2018

Following a declaration made by seven EU Member States in March 2017, the European Commission adopted a proposal to establish a joint undertaking for high-performance computing (HPC) under Article 187 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) on 11 January 2018. The proposed regulation would establish the joint undertaking for the period to 31 December 2026 and provide it with €486 million in EU funds from the Horizon 2020 and Connecting Europe Facility programmes. Participating ...

Following a declaration made by seven EU Member States in March 2017, the European Commission adopted a proposal to establish a joint undertaking for high-performance computing (HPC) under Article 187 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) on 11 January 2018. The proposed regulation would establish the joint undertaking for the period to 31 December 2026 and provide it with €486 million in EU funds from the Horizon 2020 and Connecting Europe Facility programmes. Participating states are expected to provide an equivalent contribution to the joint undertaking, and the private sector is expected to commit €422 million in additional funds. The joint undertaking would be charged with the joint procurement of two pre-exascale supercomputers for the Union. It would also implement an HPC research and innovation programme to support the European HPC ecosystem in developing technologies to reach exascale performance by 2022-2023.

Affordable communications for businesses and consumers

01-02-2018

The concept of ICTs covers a broad spectrum of technologies, ranging from information technology (IT) through telecommunications, broadcast media, and all types of audio and video processing and transmission to network-based control and monitoring functions. Information and communication technologies (ICTs) and data and internet access services have taken the place of traditional telephone services as the key products for both consumers and businesses. Although linear broadcasting continues to be ...

The concept of ICTs covers a broad spectrum of technologies, ranging from information technology (IT) through telecommunications, broadcast media, and all types of audio and video processing and transmission to network-based control and monitoring functions. Information and communication technologies (ICTs) and data and internet access services have taken the place of traditional telephone services as the key products for both consumers and businesses. Although linear broadcasting continues to be the principal medium of information distribution and entertainment in Europe, more and more audiovisual content is available on demand and 4G and 5G internet connectivity is subject to exponential growth. As a consequence, the EU has set up a regulatory framework for telecommunications covering fixed and wireless telecoms, internet, broadcasting and transmission services, through a series of rules which apply throughout the EU Member States.

Innovation Policy

01-02-2018

Innovation plays an increasing role in our economy. It provides benefits for citizens as both consumers and workers. It is essential to creating better jobs, building a greener society and improving our quality of life, but also to maintaining EU competitiveness in the global market. Innovation policy is the interface between research and technological development policy and industrial policy and aims to create a conducive framework for bringing ideas to market.

Innovation plays an increasing role in our economy. It provides benefits for citizens as both consumers and workers. It is essential to creating better jobs, building a greener society and improving our quality of life, but also to maintaining EU competitiveness in the global market. Innovation policy is the interface between research and technological development policy and industrial policy and aims to create a conducive framework for bringing ideas to market.

Digital Agenda for Europe

01-02-2018

Since 1995, information and communication technologies (ICTs) have driven productivity gains and growth in the EU[1]. The concept of ICTs covers a broad spectrum of technologies, ranging from information technology (IT) through telecommunications, broadcast media, and all types of audio and video processing and transmission to network-based control and monitoring functions. Over the past three decades, technological ‘convergence’ has been blurring the boundaries between telecommunications, broadcasting ...

Since 1995, information and communication technologies (ICTs) have driven productivity gains and growth in the EU[1]. The concept of ICTs covers a broad spectrum of technologies, ranging from information technology (IT) through telecommunications, broadcast media, and all types of audio and video processing and transmission to network-based control and monitoring functions. Over the past three decades, technological ‘convergence’ has been blurring the boundaries between telecommunications, broadcasting and IT. Although linear broadcasting continues to be the principal medium of information distribution and entertainment in Europe, more and more audiovisual content is available on demand, while exponential growth in 4G and 5G internet connectivity and the ‘internet of things’ (IoT) gives the internet an increasingly ubiquitous dimension. With a view to addressing the different challenges, the Commission launched the digital single market in 2015 to deliver the main legislative proposals set as priority, such as boosting e-commerce, copyright, audiovisuals, the telecoms review, ePrivacy, harmonisation of digital rights, affordable parcel delivery, harmonised VAT rules and cybersecurity.

Galileo and EGNOS

24-01-2018

Galileo and the European geostationary navigation overlay service (EGNOS) are two satellite navigation systems under civil control. Galileo is an autonomous global navigation satellite system consisting of a constellation of satellites and a global network of ground stations. EGNOS is a regional satellite navigation system that monitors, corrects and improves the accuracy of open signals emitted by existing global satellite navigation systems (GPS, Glonass). Galileo and EGNOS are infrastructures ...

Galileo and the European geostationary navigation overlay service (EGNOS) are two satellite navigation systems under civil control. Galileo is an autonomous global navigation satellite system consisting of a constellation of satellites and a global network of ground stations. EGNOS is a regional satellite navigation system that monitors, corrects and improves the accuracy of open signals emitted by existing global satellite navigation systems (GPS, Glonass). Galileo and EGNOS are infrastructures owned by the European Union, which were conceived in close cooperation with the European Space Agency. They guarantee Europe independent access to a reliable positioning satellite signal, allowing more accuracy than that offered by other accessible systems.

What if all our meat were grown in a lab?

17-01-2018

Laboratory meat is grown from a small number of cells taken from a live animal and placed in a growth medium in a bioreactor where they proliferate independently. If meat cultured in this way became widely available, it could significantly alleviate the environmental problems currently caused by livestock production - such as greenhouse gas emissions and nitrogen pollution of waterways - without requiring humans to alter their consumption patterns. This publication provides an overview of the potential ...

Laboratory meat is grown from a small number of cells taken from a live animal and placed in a growth medium in a bioreactor where they proliferate independently. If meat cultured in this way became widely available, it could significantly alleviate the environmental problems currently caused by livestock production - such as greenhouse gas emissions and nitrogen pollution of waterways - without requiring humans to alter their consumption patterns. This publication provides an overview of the potential impacts of laboratory meat on environment, public health and farming, and makes suggestions for anticipatory policy-making in this area.

EU framework programme processes: Adoption, implementation, evaluation

17-01-2018

Over the past 35 years, the European Union (EU) institutions have adopted eight framework programmes for research. The lifecycles of these framework programmes have been progressively streamlined and aligned with the general guidelines for the adoption of EU programmes. These lifecycles unfold in four key phases: adoption, implementation, execution, and evaluation, with the EU institutions being in charge of all phases except execution. The adoption of a new framework programme includes the preparation ...

Over the past 35 years, the European Union (EU) institutions have adopted eight framework programmes for research. The lifecycles of these framework programmes have been progressively streamlined and aligned with the general guidelines for the adoption of EU programmes. These lifecycles unfold in four key phases: adoption, implementation, execution, and evaluation, with the EU institutions being in charge of all phases except execution. The adoption of a new framework programme includes the preparation of an impact assessment, the preparation of the Commission proposals and the adoption of the various legislative acts by the European Parliament and the Council to establish the programme. The implementation phase covers the adoption of the work programmes and the selection of the projects to be funded. Following the execution of the research and innovation activities, the evaluation phase aims to assess the outcomes of the programmes and whether the initial objectives have been met. In 2018, a new cycle is expected to start for the adoption of the ninth framework programme for research and innovation (FP9) to be effective by 2020. Understanding the processes that take place under each phase of this cycle is important for the preparation and adoption of the key legislative acts, establishing (1) the framework programme itself, (2) the specific programmes for implementation, and (3) the rules for participation, and for dissemination of the programme's results.

Understanding artificial intelligence

11-01-2018

Artificial intelligence (AI) systems already permeate daily life: they drive cars, decide on mortgage applications, translate texts, recognise faces on social networks, identify spam emails, create artworks, play games, and intervene in conflict zones. The AI revolution that began in the 2000s emerged from the combination of machine learning techniques and 'big data'. The algorithms behind these systems work by identifying statistical correlation in the data they analyse, enabling them to perform ...

Artificial intelligence (AI) systems already permeate daily life: they drive cars, decide on mortgage applications, translate texts, recognise faces on social networks, identify spam emails, create artworks, play games, and intervene in conflict zones. The AI revolution that began in the 2000s emerged from the combination of machine learning techniques and 'big data'. The algorithms behind these systems work by identifying statistical correlation in the data they analyse, enabling them to perform tasks for which intelligence is required if a human were to perform them. Nevertheless, data-driven AI can only perform one task at a time, and cannot transfer its knowledge. 'Strong AI', able to display human-like intelligence and common sense, and which might be able to set its own goals, is not yet within reach. Despite the fears portrayed in film and TV entertainment, the idea of a 'superintelligence' able to self-improve and dominate humans remains an esoteric possibility, as development of strong AI systems is not predicted for a few decades or more, if indeed development ever reaches this stage. Nevertheless, the development of data-driven AI systems implies adaptation of legal frameworks on the collection, use and storage of data, due to privacy and other issues. Bias in data supplied to AI systems can also reproduce or amplify bias in the decisions they make. However, the key issue remains the level of autonomy given to AI systems to make decisions that could be life-changing, keeping in mind that they only provide recommendations, that they do not understand the tasks they perform, and that there is no way to know how they reach their conclusions. AI systems are expected to impact society, especially the job market, and could increase inequalities. To counter the abuse of probabilistic prediction and the risks to privacy, in April 2016 the European Parliament and the Council of the EU adopted the General Data Protection Regulation. The European Parliament also requested an update of the Union legal framework on robotics and AI in February 2017.

Mapping the Cost of Non-Europe, 2014-19 - Fourth edition

07-12-2017

This study brings together work in progress on a long-term project to identify and analyse the 'cost of non-Europe' in a number of policy fields. This concept, first pioneered by the European Parliament in the 1980s, is used here to quantify the potential efficiency gains in today's European economy through pursuing a series of policy initiatives recently advocated by Parliament – from a wider and deeper digital single market to more systematic coordination of national and European defence policies ...

This study brings together work in progress on a long-term project to identify and analyse the 'cost of non-Europe' in a number of policy fields. This concept, first pioneered by the European Parliament in the 1980s, is used here to quantify the potential efficiency gains in today's European economy through pursuing a series of policy initiatives recently advocated by Parliament – from a wider and deeper digital single market to more systematic coordination of national and European defence policies or increased cooperation to fight corporate tax avoidance. The benefits are measured principally in additional GDP generated or more rational use of public resources. The latest analysis suggests that the European economy could be boosted by €1.75 trillion per year – or 12 % of EU-28 GDP (2016) – by such measures over time. The study is intended to make a contribution to the on-going discussion about the European Union's policy priorities over the current five-year institutional cycle, running from 2014 to 2019.

What if mini-brains could help us understand dementia?

05-12-2017

Organoids are artificially grown organs that mimic the properties of real organs. What new possibilities for treating diseases, drug development, and personalised and regenerative medicine do organoids provide?

Organoids are artificially grown organs that mimic the properties of real organs. What new possibilities for treating diseases, drug development, and personalised and regenerative medicine do organoids provide?

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21-02-2018
Hearing on Work-Life Balance
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21-02-2018
Hearing on "Collective redress in the EU: the state of play and next steps"
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21-02-2018
Public hearing on Sustainable Finance
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