403

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European app economy: State of play, challenges and EU policy

24-05-2018

Ten years have passed since the app economy was launched. Since then apps have evolved to play an increasingly important role in the life of citizens and became crucial to the success of many industries. Growing connectivity and availability of portable devices ensure that this trend will continue. The European app economy is rather successful and accounts for just under a third of revenues in the global market. Clusters of app developers exist in a few western European and Nordic Member States creating ...

Ten years have passed since the app economy was launched. Since then apps have evolved to play an increasingly important role in the life of citizens and became crucial to the success of many industries. Growing connectivity and availability of portable devices ensure that this trend will continue. The European app economy is rather successful and accounts for just under a third of revenues in the global market. Clusters of app developers exist in a few western European and Nordic Member States creating well-paid jobs, value and innovation in the digital economy. However, some bottlenecks still exist and hamper the growth of the sector. These include limited availability of finance, shortage of digital skills, the need to constantly upgrade infrastructure, and improving access to data. The EU strives to address these issues by creating an environment conducive to growth of the app economy. The main policy actions include strengthening the digital single market, funding research and innovation, creating fair taxation rules, developing standards and interoperability, fostering consumer protection and confidence, reforming training and education systems and supporting the development of a data economy and the internet of things.

EYE event - Quantum leaps: This time it's the EU!

16-05-2018

The European Commission has launched an ambitious €1 billion research initiative on quantum technology, which will contribute, among other things, to the development of quantum supercomputers; expected to surpass traditional supercomputers, these could dramatically improve the technology used in areas such as communication, computing and sensing.

The European Commission has launched an ambitious €1 billion research initiative on quantum technology, which will contribute, among other things, to the development of quantum supercomputers; expected to surpass traditional supercomputers, these could dramatically improve the technology used in areas such as communication, computing and sensing.

EYE event - The DNA revolution: We better talk this over

16-05-2018

Powerful new tools that have emerged in recent years have rendered DNA-editing technology more precise, more accessible and more affordable, allowing it to find new applications in fields such as medicine, agriculture, and energy. With its top-class academic institutions and strong biotechnology research, Europe is a driving force behind this 'synthetic biology revolution'. However, this innovative technology also poses serious risks arising from the unintended or intended effects of its use, and ...

Powerful new tools that have emerged in recent years have rendered DNA-editing technology more precise, more accessible and more affordable, allowing it to find new applications in fields such as medicine, agriculture, and energy. With its top-class academic institutions and strong biotechnology research, Europe is a driving force behind this 'synthetic biology revolution'. However, this innovative technology also poses serious risks arising from the unintended or intended effects of its use, and raises ethical concerns about the potential modification of the human genome. Can we minimise these risks, while enjoying the benefits of this new technology?

Delegation note - Economic, social and territorial situation and policies in the United States of America (focus: Boston, Massachusetts)

15-05-2018

This briefing was prepared to provide information for the visit to Boston (Massachusetts) and Washington, DC from 7 to 11 May 2018 of a delegation from the European Parliament’s Committee on Regional Development (REGI).

This briefing was prepared to provide information for the visit to Boston (Massachusetts) and Washington, DC from 7 to 11 May 2018 of a delegation from the European Parliament’s Committee on Regional Development (REGI).

Review of the Directive on the Re-use of Public Sector Information (Directive 2013/37/EU)

25-04-2018

The Directive on the re-use of public sector information 2013/37/EU (PSI Directive) provides a common legal framework for a European market for public sector information. It entered into force on 17 July 2013 following a review of the initial PSI Directive of 17 November 2003. This implementation appraisal is written in anticipation of the second review of the directive, the plans for which are likely to be presented by the end of April 2018 as part of a broader package targeting the data economy ...

The Directive on the re-use of public sector information 2013/37/EU (PSI Directive) provides a common legal framework for a European market for public sector information. It entered into force on 17 July 2013 following a review of the initial PSI Directive of 17 November 2003. This implementation appraisal is written in anticipation of the second review of the directive, the plans for which are likely to be presented by the end of April 2018 as part of a broader package targeting the data economy. The upcoming review will attempt to identify opportunities for reducing regulatory costs and for simplifying the existing legislation without negatively affecting the achievements of the underlying policy goals. The ongoing evaluation of the Directive on the legal protection of databases 96/9/EC (Database Directive) will feed into the review by identifying potential issues with the interplay between the PSI and Database Directives. The Commission has also announced that the PSI review will be aligned with the follow-up actions to the REFIT mid-term policy evaluation of Directive 2007/2/EC, 'INSPIRE' (Directive establishing an Infrastructure for Spatial Information in the European Community). For these reasons, both these directives have been included in this appraisal.

Adapting to new digital realities: Main issues and policy responses

19-04-2018

Digital technologies have changed the way we live and transformed the world around us at unprecedented speed. They have affected all important aspects of life, both at work and at home, and have influenced almost everything from human relations to the economy, to the extent that access to the internet has now become a basic human right recognised by the United Nations. This profound change presents both opportunities and threats to our society. Citizens need specific skills and access to be able ...

Digital technologies have changed the way we live and transformed the world around us at unprecedented speed. They have affected all important aspects of life, both at work and at home, and have influenced almost everything from human relations to the economy, to the extent that access to the internet has now become a basic human right recognised by the United Nations. This profound change presents both opportunities and threats to our society. Citizens need specific skills and access to be able to meaningfully take part in society and work. European businesses need an adequate policy framework and infrastructure to capture the enormous value created by the digital economy. Supporting innovation, removing barriers in the digital single market, and effectively managing and using data are the necessary tools to assist them and boost economic growth in Europe. The European Union takes an active part in shaping the digital economy and society, with cross policy initiatives that range from boosting investment, through reforms of copyright and e privacy, to removal of geo-blocking and development of e-government. This multifaceted approach is necessary to facilitate adaptation to complex new realities. The European Parliament, as co legislator, is involved in shaping the policy framework which will help citizens and businesses fully utilise the potential of digital technologies.

The regions in the digital single market: ICT and digital opportunities for European regions

19-04-2018

The digital economy is growing at seven times the rate of the rest of the economy. The European Commission estimates that completing the digital single market could contribute €415 billion per year to Europe's economy, create 3.8 million jobs and transform public services. In addition, many future jobs will require information and communications technologies (ICT) skills, rendering the process of acquiring digital skills an imperative. The European Commission has presented several initiatives to ...

The digital economy is growing at seven times the rate of the rest of the economy. The European Commission estimates that completing the digital single market could contribute €415 billion per year to Europe's economy, create 3.8 million jobs and transform public services. In addition, many future jobs will require information and communications technologies (ICT) skills, rendering the process of acquiring digital skills an imperative. The European Commission has presented several initiatives to boost the use of ICT in Europe. The Digital Agenda for Europe, announced in 2010 in the framework of the Europe 2020 strategy, aimed at promoting economic recovery and improving social inclusion through a more digitally proficient Europe. The Digital Single Market strategy, introduced in 2015, complements the Digital Agenda for Europe. Achieving a digital single market will ensure that Europe maintains its position as a world leader in the digital economy, helping European companies to grow globally. In 2016, the European Commission adopted a new Skills Agenda for Europe which includes measures on the acquisition of digital skills. Although many of the digital single market priorities are primarily dealt with at national level, various initiatives can be explored at the local and regional level. Regions and cities can plan and pursue their own digital strategies in the interests of enhancing economic growth and to promote their citizens' wellbeing. Enhanced use of digital technologies can improve citizens' access to information and culture, promote open government, equality and non-discrimination. However, a number of challenges need to be addressed to fully reap the benefits of digitalisation. Personnel with ICT skills are still lacking in Europe and many European citizens are not adequately trained to carry out ICT-related tasks. In addition, broadband connectivity in some parts of Europe remains slow. Although certain EU regions and local authorities experiment with new technologies, not all of them have managed to provide a high-level range of digital services and ICT related activities. This briefing is an update of an earlier edition, published in October 2015.

What if we were to travel on levitating trains?

12-04-2018

Magnetic levitation-based transport might be about to enter our lives, providing for faster, safer and more energy-efficient journeys. As it will enable longer distances to be covered more rapidly and cleanly, could it affect where we choose to live?

Magnetic levitation-based transport might be about to enter our lives, providing for faster, safer and more energy-efficient journeys. As it will enable longer distances to be covered more rapidly and cleanly, could it affect where we choose to live?

Preparing FP9: Designing the successor to the Horizon 2020 research and innovation framework programme

11-04-2018

The preparation process for an EU framework programme for research and innovation includes a variety of activities: evaluation of the previous programme; expert studies to define the scope and priorities of the new programme; and proposals for new instruments. The EU institutions, the advisory committees, the Member States and other stakeholders also put their expectations and opinions forward on the shape and content of the programme. This paper provides an overview of all the activities developed ...

The preparation process for an EU framework programme for research and innovation includes a variety of activities: evaluation of the previous programme; expert studies to define the scope and priorities of the new programme; and proposals for new instruments. The EU institutions, the advisory committees, the Member States and other stakeholders also put their expectations and opinions forward on the shape and content of the programme. This paper provides an overview of all the activities developed to contribute to the preparation of FP9. It also analyses the position of all the actors on 10 key discussion points including: the difficult battle over the FP9 budget; the tensions between support for excellence and the need for cohesion; streamlining of instruments and simplification of processes; requests for greater EU added value from the programme, linked to its collaborative nature; the role of the Member States in the programme's governance and implementation; and the expected innovations: the European Innovation Council and a mission-oriented approach.

Should we fear artificial intelligence?

26-03-2018

For better or worse, artificial intelligence (AI) is predicted to have a huge impact on the future of humanity. As new promises and concerns reach increasingly mainstream audiences, the debate is starting to capture the public imagination. In this publication, we present four opinion pieces, each responding to the question should we fear AI? The four authors come from different disciplinary backgrounds and present diverging perspectives on whether we should fear the future of AI, and how we should ...

For better or worse, artificial intelligence (AI) is predicted to have a huge impact on the future of humanity. As new promises and concerns reach increasingly mainstream audiences, the debate is starting to capture the public imagination. In this publication, we present four opinion pieces, each responding to the question should we fear AI? The four authors come from different disciplinary backgrounds and present diverging perspectives on whether we should fear the future of AI, and how we should proceed with its development.

External author

EPRS, DG; Peter J. Bentley, University College London Miles Brundage, University of Oxford Olle Häggström, Chalmers University Thomas Metzinger, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz With a foreword by María Teresa Giménez Barbat, MEP and an introduction by Philip Boucher, Scientific Foresight Unit (STOA)

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