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European defence industrial development programme (EDIDP)

07-06-2018

The European Union is facing new security threats amid growing uncertainty about the reliability of some of its allies. As a consequence, it has embarked on a general scaling-up of its defence capabilities. A European defence action plan has been agreed and a European Defence Fund created to provide financial support, ranging from the research phase to the acquisition phase of military equipment and technologies. The present legislative proposal for EDIDP, which would be part of that fund, is destined ...

The European Union is facing new security threats amid growing uncertainty about the reliability of some of its allies. As a consequence, it has embarked on a general scaling-up of its defence capabilities. A European defence action plan has been agreed and a European Defence Fund created to provide financial support, ranging from the research phase to the acquisition phase of military equipment and technologies. The present legislative proposal for EDIDP, which would be part of that fund, is destined to provide the European defence industry with financial support during the development phase of new products and technologies in areas selected at European level. Parliament's Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) decided to open trilogue negotiations; these have been ongoing since 15 March 2018.

Common security and defence policy

01-02-2018

The common security and defence policy (CSDP) sets the framework for EU political and military structures, and military and civilian missions and operations abroad. The 2016 EU Global Strategy lays out the strategy for the CSDP, while the Lisbon Treaty clarifies the institutional aspects and strengthens the role of the European Parliament. The CSDP has recently undergone major strategic and operational changes to meet security challenges and popular demand for increased EU responses.

The common security and defence policy (CSDP) sets the framework for EU political and military structures, and military and civilian missions and operations abroad. The 2016 EU Global Strategy lays out the strategy for the CSDP, while the Lisbon Treaty clarifies the institutional aspects and strengthens the role of the European Parliament. The CSDP has recently undergone major strategic and operational changes to meet security challenges and popular demand for increased EU responses.

Defence industry

01-02-2018

With a turnover of EUR 97.3 billion in 2014, 500 000 people directly employed and 1.2 million indirect jobs, the European defence industry is a major industrial sector. It is characterised by economic and technological components which are important factors for Europe’s industrial competitiveness. Created in 2004, the European Defence Agency contributes to the development of this industry. The sector is currently facing challenges such as market fragmentation and a decrease in defence spending.

With a turnover of EUR 97.3 billion in 2014, 500 000 people directly employed and 1.2 million indirect jobs, the European defence industry is a major industrial sector. It is characterised by economic and technological components which are important factors for Europe’s industrial competitiveness. Created in 2004, the European Defence Agency contributes to the development of this industry. The sector is currently facing challenges such as market fragmentation and a decrease in defence spending.

European defence – A year on from the global strategy

12-07-2017

On 7 June 2017, the Commission presented its reflection paper on 'European defence by 2025'. The paper, part of the white paper process on the future of Europe, comes almost a year after the unveiling of the European Union's global strategy on foreign and security policy, and follows 12 months of significant progress in decisions on the course of EU security and defence policy (CSDP). During the last quarter of 2016, High Representative of the EU for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy and Vice President ...

On 7 June 2017, the Commission presented its reflection paper on 'European defence by 2025'. The paper, part of the white paper process on the future of Europe, comes almost a year after the unveiling of the European Union's global strategy on foreign and security policy, and follows 12 months of significant progress in decisions on the course of EU security and defence policy (CSDP). During the last quarter of 2016, High Representative of the EU for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy and Vice President of the Commission, Federica Mogherini, presented a set of three specific action plans to upgrade EU security and defence policy: the implementation plan on security and defence, the European defence action plan, and the implementation plan for the EU-NATO Warsaw Declaration. The three plans, which are sometimes referred to as the 'winter package on defence', detailed a series of actions to be taken in the medium- and long-term to implement the Lisbon Treaty provisions on security and defence. These are expected to lead to stronger coordination within the EU, as well as strengthen the EU defence industry and market. Debates on the future of European defence were significantly affected by two major events that took place in 2016: the decision of the United Kingdom (one of the strongest players in European defence) to withdraw from the EU; and the election of Donald Trump as President of the United States. This briefing complements an earlier version of July 2016, PE 586.607. The centrespread of this briefing presents a timeline of the major developments in EU defence policy in the year since the global strategy's release.

European defence [What Think Tanks are thinking]

08-12-2017

The European Union is moving closer to developing integrated European defence after 23 of its 28 Member States agreed in November on joint military investment in equipment, research and develop¬ment through Permanent Structured Cooperation (PESCO), an enhanced-cooperation mechanism enshrined in the 2009 Lisbon Treaty. The plan is to jointly develop European military capabilities and make them available for operations separately from, or in complementarity with, NATO. This note brings together commentaries ...

The European Union is moving closer to developing integrated European defence after 23 of its 28 Member States agreed in November on joint military investment in equipment, research and develop¬ment through Permanent Structured Cooperation (PESCO), an enhanced-cooperation mechanism enshrined in the 2009 Lisbon Treaty. The plan is to jointly develop European military capabilities and make them available for operations separately from, or in complementarity with, NATO. This note brings together commentaries, analyses and studies by major international think tanks and research institutes on European Union defence. Earlier publications on the topic can be found in a previous edition of 'What Think Tanks are Thinking' published in May 2017.