Civil Society and Media in Myanmar/Burma's Political Transition

22-05-2014

Since Myanmar/Burma launched its political transition began in 2011, civil society in the country has become more active and more visible. The parliament has opened its doors to voices from the outside – although hesitantly and on ad hoc basis. Non-state actors are now involved in revising the constitution, and the result will be pivotal for the credibility of the general elections in 2015 and, by extension, the fate of the country's democratic reforms. The media in Myanmar/Burma have played an important role in making political processes more transparent. Yet journalists still work in climate of uncertainty and intimidation, while unclear legal provisions discourage the free expression of opinion, especially on the internet. In 2013, the EU adopted a comprehensive framework to support democracy, peace and development in Myanmar/Burma. To attain the policy's objectives, the country's diverse and dynamic civil society must be closely involved.

Since Myanmar/Burma launched its political transition began in 2011, civil society in the country has become more active and more visible. The parliament has opened its doors to voices from the outside – although hesitantly and on ad hoc basis. Non-state actors are now involved in revising the constitution, and the result will be pivotal for the credibility of the general elections in 2015 and, by extension, the fate of the country's democratic reforms. The media in Myanmar/Burma have played an important role in making political processes more transparent. Yet journalists still work in climate of uncertainty and intimidation, while unclear legal provisions discourage the free expression of opinion, especially on the internet. In 2013, the EU adopted a comprehensive framework to support democracy, peace and development in Myanmar/Burma. To attain the policy's objectives, the country's diverse and dynamic civil society must be closely involved.