Fighting trade in tools for torture and executions

04-04-2016

The EU is committed to fighting torture and use of the death penalty throughout the world. Both phenomena continue to afflict a significant number of countries, and trade in torture tools is booming in the world. One of the most important measures taken by the EU has been its 2005 Regulation imposing restrictions in trade in torture tools. Despite some visible effects, it has been repeatedly criticised for loopholes which allow trade in goods that could be used for torture, executions and other ill-treatment, as well as related activities like brokering or advertising such goods to continue. Responding to a 2010 European Parliament resolution, the European Commission adopted a legislative proposal to amend the Regulation in 2014. The proposal, which is based on the approach that only proportionate and necessary trade restrictions should be imposed – to avoid cumbersome administrative procedures to exporters – addresses only in part the EP’s recommendations and the concerns of civil society organisations fighting torture. The EP's International Trade Committee adopted several amendments that effectively address concerns raised by these organisations. A more recent edition of this document is available. Find it by searching by the document title at this address: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/thinktank/en/home.html

The EU is committed to fighting torture and use of the death penalty throughout the world. Both phenomena continue to afflict a significant number of countries, and trade in torture tools is booming in the world. One of the most important measures taken by the EU has been its 2005 Regulation imposing restrictions in trade in torture tools. Despite some visible effects, it has been repeatedly criticised for loopholes which allow trade in goods that could be used for torture, executions and other ill-treatment, as well as related activities like brokering or advertising such goods to continue. Responding to a 2010 European Parliament resolution, the European Commission adopted a legislative proposal to amend the Regulation in 2014. The proposal, which is based on the approach that only proportionate and necessary trade restrictions should be imposed – to avoid cumbersome administrative procedures to exporters – addresses only in part the EP’s recommendations and the concerns of civil society organisations fighting torture. The EP's International Trade Committee adopted several amendments that effectively address concerns raised by these organisations. A more recent edition of this document is available. Find it by searching by the document title at this address: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/thinktank/en/home.html