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Valuation reports in the context of banking resolution: What are the challenges?

05-07-2018

The paper discusses the problem of valuation in bank resolution. In an overview over the most relevant principles of valuation theory, the paper notes the difficulties inherent in valuing risks and illiquidity in holding non-traded assets. Subsequently, the paper briefly reviews the resolution of Banco Popular Español, and then discusses the need for clarification of the no-investor-worse-off principle, the relation between the price in a sale of business and the presumed outcome in an insolvency ...

The paper discusses the problem of valuation in bank resolution. In an overview over the most relevant principles of valuation theory, the paper notes the difficulties inherent in valuing risks and illiquidity in holding non-traded assets. Subsequently, the paper briefly reviews the resolution of Banco Popular Español, and then discusses the need for clarification of the no-investor-worse-off principle, the relation between the price in a sale of business and the presumed outcome in an insolvency procedure, and the difficulties attached to assessing the value of an illiquid asset that is held. The paper concludes with a discussion of the need for time, for valuation and in resolution, warns against a moratorium on withdrawals and payouts, and argues that time pressures would be much reduced if funding in resolution was provided for.

Valuation reports in the context of banking resolution: What are the challenges?

05-07-2018

This study discusses the challenges concerning bank valuation reports in resolution. The resolution mechanism has three types of valuation reports, respectively to determine whether a bank is failing or likely to fail (valuation 1), to inform the use of the resolution tools including bail-in (valuation 2), and to ensure that the no creditor worse off condition is respected (valuation 3). The first experience with the preparation of valuation reports shows that even with the more formal procedures ...

This study discusses the challenges concerning bank valuation reports in resolution. The resolution mechanism has three types of valuation reports, respectively to determine whether a bank is failing or likely to fail (valuation 1), to inform the use of the resolution tools including bail-in (valuation 2), and to ensure that the no creditor worse off condition is respected (valuation 3). The first experience with the preparation of valuation reports shows that even with the more formal procedures there are still substantial uncertainties regarding the outcome of these valuations due to organisational, legal and economic challenges. Additional mitigating measures should be considered to reduce the uncertainty.

Parlamendiväline autor

Willem Pieter de Groen, CEPS

Valuation Reports in the Context of Banking Resolution: What are the Challenges?

13-06-2018

This paper discusses from a legal perspective the challenges and difficulties involved in the production of the valuation reports required by the BRRD and considers the option of a moratorium tool for use by the resolution authorities as a possible way forward, which could address the concerns about timing and flexibility in the valuation process. Given the discretionary powers of the resolution authorities and the need for SRB independence, the paper also considers the wider issues of legitimacy ...

This paper discusses from a legal perspective the challenges and difficulties involved in the production of the valuation reports required by the BRRD and considers the option of a moratorium tool for use by the resolution authorities as a possible way forward, which could address the concerns about timing and flexibility in the valuation process. Given the discretionary powers of the resolution authorities and the need for SRB independence, the paper also considers the wider issues of legitimacy and accountability in the actions and decisions taken by the Single Resolution Board in light of the unique and complex institutional structure of the SRM.

Parlamendiväline autor

Rosa María Lastra , Rodrigo Olivares-Caminal

Review of the 2017 SREP results

21-03-2018

This paper reviews the 2017 SREP results with a view to assessing their capital market implications and seeing whether the information provision about the SREP results could be improved. Aggregated SREP information as published by the ECB can be useful in detecting trends in banks’ conditions, but it cannot be meaningfully applied to assess capital market reactions to the SREP results. Bank-level SREP disclosures are voluntary, and therefore are expected to be biased towards news that is favourable ...

This paper reviews the 2017 SREP results with a view to assessing their capital market implications and seeing whether the information provision about the SREP results could be improved. Aggregated SREP information as published by the ECB can be useful in detecting trends in banks’ conditions, but it cannot be meaningfully applied to assess capital market reactions to the SREP results. Bank-level SREP disclosures are voluntary, and therefore are expected to be biased towards news that is favourable to investors in securities. Consistent with this, we find that bank stock returns on average are positive on SREP disclosure days. Overall, the 2017 SREP information that is in the public domain is insufficient to evaluate the efficacy of the SREP as conducted by the ECB in terms of improving the regulatory and market discipline of banks. The publication of full bank-level SREP information (by either the ECB or the individual banks) would facilitate such an evaluation, but full disclosure is undesirable as it exposes the banks with the weakest supervisory reviews to potentially very severe market discipline. However, the ECB could improve the information provision about the SREP by requiring banks that choose to reveal any capital regulatory information to disclose a complete breakdown of their CET1 demand to improve data comparability across banks and hence potentially market discipline.

Parlamendiväline autor

Harry Huizinga

Review of the 2017 SREP results

14-03-2018

This report looks at the methodology used by the ECB to carry out its supervisory evaluation of banks (“SREP”), as well as at the aggregate results disclosed by the supervisors and the figures released over time by individual banks. Our review suggests that greater disclosure may improve uniformity in how the SREP is implemented across institutions, as well as consistency between SREP analyses and supervisory priorities. Disclosure towards banks could be enhanced by using a standard, detailed template ...

This report looks at the methodology used by the ECB to carry out its supervisory evaluation of banks (“SREP”), as well as at the aggregate results disclosed by the supervisors and the figures released over time by individual banks. Our review suggests that greater disclosure may improve uniformity in how the SREP is implemented across institutions, as well as consistency between SREP analyses and supervisory priorities. Disclosure towards banks could be enhanced by using a standard, detailed template in the communication of the SREP findings (including “horizontal” benchmarking analyses and differences between supervisory computations and the banks’ own estimates). The release of SREP results to the public, while strengthening market discipline, may trigger undesirable reactions by customers and market counterparties; for banks with listed financial instruments, however, the additional capital requirements following from the SREP meet the definition of inside information provided in the Market Abuse Regulation, and should therefore be publicly disclosed. Finally, higher transparency standards are called for when it comes to the methodologies and metrics used by supervisors to assess specific areas within the SREP.

Parlamendiväline autor

A.Resti

The Brexit process [What Think Tanks are thinking]

12-01-2018

The EU’s Heads of State or Government gave the green light in December 2017 to the second phase of negotiations on the United Kingdom's withdrawal from the EU. They agreed that ‘sufficient progress’ had been made in talks on issues in the first phase. Those include the UK's financial obligations on leaving the EU, the rights of EU citizens within the UK and of UK citizens within the EU, and how to deal with the border between Northern Ireland and Ireland. The next phase of talks will focus on transitional ...

The EU’s Heads of State or Government gave the green light in December 2017 to the second phase of negotiations on the United Kingdom's withdrawal from the EU. They agreed that ‘sufficient progress’ had been made in talks on issues in the first phase. Those include the UK's financial obligations on leaving the EU, the rights of EU citizens within the UK and of UK citizens within the EU, and how to deal with the border between Northern Ireland and Ireland. The next phase of talks will focus on transitional arrangements and the future EU-UK relationship, including in the field of trade. This note offers links to recent commentaries and reports published by major international think tanks and other organisations on EU-UK negotiations and on the implications of Brexit more widely. More studies on these issues can be found in a previous edition of ‘What Think Tanks are thinking’ from October 2017.

Revised framework for investment firms

13-12-2017

The EU framework for investment firms consists of several legislative acts: the Directive on markets in financial instruments (MiFID), the Capital Requirements Regulation 575/2013 (CRR) and the Capital Requirements Directive 2013/36/EU (CRD). Together with various international rules, these legislative acts lay down rules on the activity of credit institutions and their prudential supervision. In 2016, the European Commission submitted two legislative proposals amending the CRR and the CRD and it ...

The EU framework for investment firms consists of several legislative acts: the Directive on markets in financial instruments (MiFID), the Capital Requirements Regulation 575/2013 (CRR) and the Capital Requirements Directive 2013/36/EU (CRD). Together with various international rules, these legislative acts lay down rules on the activity of credit institutions and their prudential supervision. In 2016, the European Commission submitted two legislative proposals amending the CRR and the CRD and it now intends to further revise the existing framework for investment firms. Research shows that there are several challenges influencing the current system, especially a plethora of investment firms with different prudential requirements, leading to legislative complexity and decreasing legislative clarity. Parliament and the European Economic and Social Committee have, on several occasions, called for improvements to the existing framework. The European Commission itself has expressed a willingness to revise the CRR/CRD framework and it is expected that it will publish a legislative proposal (with its impact assessment) on a revised framework for investment firms on 20 December 2017.

Finalisation of Basel III post-crisis reforms

12-12-2017

This note is mainly based on documents published by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS) on 7 December 2017 under the header Finalising Basel III post-crisis reforms, namely the High-level summary of Basel III reforms and the full text of the reforms. EGOV has previously published a briefing specifically on the role of the BCBS.

This note is mainly based on documents published by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS) on 7 December 2017 under the header Finalising Basel III post-crisis reforms, namely the High-level summary of Basel III reforms and the full text of the reforms. EGOV has previously published a briefing specifically on the role of the BCBS.

Priority dossiers under the Bulgarian EU Council Presidency

06-12-2017

Bulgaria will hold the EU Council Presidency from January to June 2018. This will be the first time Bulgaria has held the rotating presidency since it joined the EU in 2007. Its Presidency is part of the Trio Presidency composed of Estonia, Bulgaria and Austria. It is to be noted that a new Joint Declaration is being prepared and will be negotiated by the three Presidents in early December 2017. It is likely that the new Joint Declaration will cover January 2018-May 2019, to coincide with the legislative ...

Bulgaria will hold the EU Council Presidency from January to June 2018. This will be the first time Bulgaria has held the rotating presidency since it joined the EU in 2007. Its Presidency is part of the Trio Presidency composed of Estonia, Bulgaria and Austria. It is to be noted that a new Joint Declaration is being prepared and will be negotiated by the three Presidents in early December 2017. It is likely that the new Joint Declaration will cover January 2018-May 2019, to coincide with the legislative cycle of the European Parliament. Taking into account the need for active dialogue with EU citizens, Bulgaria will strive to achieve progress in the field of security, employment, sustainable growth and ensuring a stronger EU presence on the world stage. In particular, it tasks itself with focusing on youth questions and security issues as horizontal priorities. The Bulgarian government has announced three broad messages for its programme: Consensus, Competitiveness and Cohesion.

Sovereign Concentration Charges: A New Regime for Banks’ Sovereign Exposures

09-11-2017

Achieving the aim of Europe’s banking union project, to break the vicious circle between banks and sovereigns, requires new policy initiatives. The most direct bank-sovereign linkages are national deposit insurance and concentrated domestic sovereign exposures. Thus, simultaneously with a European Deposit Insurance Scheme (EDIS) as proposed by the European Commission in 2015, the European Union should introduce regulatory disincentives against highly concentrated sovereign exposures of euro area ...

Achieving the aim of Europe’s banking union project, to break the vicious circle between banks and sovereigns, requires new policy initiatives. The most direct bank-sovereign linkages are national deposit insurance and concentrated domestic sovereign exposures. Thus, simultaneously with a European Deposit Insurance Scheme (EDIS) as proposed by the European Commission in 2015, the European Union should introduce regulatory disincentives against highly concentrated sovereign exposures of euro area banks. This paper makes a concrete proposal for a Sovereign Concentration Charges Regulation (SCCR), including calibration and careful transitional arrangements to avoid any disorderly market impact. The SCCR and EDIS together could realistically receive political approval in 2018 and be fully implemented within a decade.

Parlamendiväline autor

N.Veron, Bruegel

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