Elections in Mexico : The PRI Returns to Government, But without a Legislative Majority

12-07-2012

The Institutional Revolutionary Party (Partido Revolucionario Institucional, PRI) and its candidate Enrique Peña Nieto emerged the clear victors of Mexico's elections on 1 July 2012. While Peña Nieto will take office as President on 1 December, the PRI and its allies did not achieve a majority in the two chambers of Congress, and the new government will have to negotiate with other parties to get support for its proposals. Overall, the elections consolidated Mexico's three-party system. The runner-up in the election, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, the candidate of the left-wing Progressive Movement (Movimiento Progresista) alliance, has refused to recognise the result and has accused the PRI of massive vote-buying. A legal challenge against the result is unlikely to succeed, and it may be difficult to mobilise sustained protests against alleged electoral fraud.

The Institutional Revolutionary Party (Partido Revolucionario Institucional, PRI) and its candidate Enrique Peña Nieto emerged the clear victors of Mexico's elections on 1 July 2012. While Peña Nieto will take office as President on 1 December, the PRI and its allies did not achieve a majority in the two chambers of Congress, and the new government will have to negotiate with other parties to get support for its proposals. Overall, the elections consolidated Mexico's three-party system. The runner-up in the election, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, the candidate of the left-wing Progressive Movement (Movimiento Progresista) alliance, has refused to recognise the result and has accused the PRI of massive vote-buying. A legal challenge against the result is unlikely to succeed, and it may be difficult to mobilise sustained protests against alleged electoral fraud.