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Lisätty 25-03-2019

Maternity and paternity leave in the EU

25-03-2019

This infographic aims to present the current maternity and paternity leave situation in EU Member States. Maternity leave policies in EU Member States are governed by the 1992 Pregnant Workers Directive. A new proposed directive on work-life balance, due to be voted on by Parliament in April 2019, is expected to introduce a mandatory period of paternity leave across the Union. Most EU countries also grant an additional period of parental leave, but parental leave is not covered in this infographic ...

This infographic aims to present the current maternity and paternity leave situation in EU Member States. Maternity leave policies in EU Member States are governed by the 1992 Pregnant Workers Directive. A new proposed directive on work-life balance, due to be voted on by Parliament in April 2019, is expected to introduce a mandatory period of paternity leave across the Union. Most EU countries also grant an additional period of parental leave, but parental leave is not covered in this infographic. This revised version presents the situation in the 28 Member States as known to us on 18 March 2019.

EU-Eastern Partnership people-to-people contacts

25-03-2019

In 2009, the EU launched its Eastern Partnership (EaP) initiative with the ambition to promote closer cooperation with six of its eastern neighbours: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine. Support for people-to-people contacts is a key element of the EU's EaP strategy, and is extended through programmes in the areas of movement of persons, education and peace-building.

In 2009, the EU launched its Eastern Partnership (EaP) initiative with the ambition to promote closer cooperation with six of its eastern neighbours: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine. Support for people-to-people contacts is a key element of the EU's EaP strategy, and is extended through programmes in the areas of movement of persons, education and peace-building.

EU-Belarus people-to-people contacts

25-03-2019

The autocratic policies pursued by Belarus's long-standing president, Alexander Lukashenko, have strained EU-Belarus ties over the years. Against this backdrop, the EU has geared its support towards the Belarusian people at large. The crisis in Ukraine slowly rekindled EU-Belarus relations, but the backbone of cooperation remains civil society support and people-to-people contacts.

The autocratic policies pursued by Belarus's long-standing president, Alexander Lukashenko, have strained EU-Belarus ties over the years. Against this backdrop, the EU has geared its support towards the Belarusian people at large. The crisis in Ukraine slowly rekindled EU-Belarus relations, but the backbone of cooperation remains civil society support and people-to-people contacts.

Outcome of the meetings of EU leaders, 21-22 March 2019

25-03-2019

Discussions at the March 2019 European Council meeting focussed on agreeing on a both legally and politically workable response to the request of the UK Prime Minister, Theresa May, that Brexit be delayed until 30 June 2019. The European Council (Article 50) agreed to extend the Article 50 period until 22 May 2019, provided that the Withdrawal Agreement is approved by the House of Commons by 29 March. If not approved, the extension would end on 12 April, with the UK required to indicate a way forward ...

Discussions at the March 2019 European Council meeting focussed on agreeing on a both legally and politically workable response to the request of the UK Prime Minister, Theresa May, that Brexit be delayed until 30 June 2019. The European Council (Article 50) agreed to extend the Article 50 period until 22 May 2019, provided that the Withdrawal Agreement is approved by the House of Commons by 29 March. If not approved, the extension would end on 12 April, with the UK required to indicate a way forward. The EU-27 also formally approved the texts agreed by the UK and the European Commission on 11 March, which add further clarification to the Withdrawal Agreement and the political declaration, in particular regarding the ‘Irish backstop’. On Friday 22, the European Council discussed jobs, growth and competitiveness, climate, external relations and fighting disinformation. As part of these discussions, EU leaders endorsed the Annual Growth Survey, decided to strengthen the EU’s economic base and called for a more assertive industrial policy. They reiterated their commitment to the Paris Agreement and called on the Council to intensify its work on a long-term climate strategy. Regarding external relations, EU Heads of State or Government prepared the forthcoming EU-China summit, reiterated their commitment to Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity, and expressed the EU’s readiness to provide humanitarian relief assistance to Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe. The European Council also marked the 25th anniversary of the European Economic Area, together with the Prime Ministers of Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway. Finally, it also appointed Philip Lane as a member of the Executive Board of the European Central Bank.

Lisätty 22-03-2019

What if a simple DNA test could predict your future?

22-03-2019

What if new-born babies were given a DNA report card that predicted their intelligence, their odds of getting a PhD, their chances of becoming a chain smoker or suffering depression, a heart attack or cancer? Thanks to ongoing genetic studies, a large amount of genetic data is available today involving millions of people. The wealth of information available to researchers allows them to create a polygenic risk score based on the DNA test of a person. This can be used to predict a person's chances ...

What if new-born babies were given a DNA report card that predicted their intelligence, their odds of getting a PhD, their chances of becoming a chain smoker or suffering depression, a heart attack or cancer? Thanks to ongoing genetic studies, a large amount of genetic data is available today involving millions of people. The wealth of information available to researchers allows them to create a polygenic risk score based on the DNA test of a person. This can be used to predict a person's chances of getting a disease, his or her traits and behaviour, and many other things about their future. Are these predictions flawless? Who would benefit from them? What are their implications for a person's life in general?

Discharge for 2017 budget – EU decentralised agencies and joint undertakings

22-03-2019

During the March II plenary session, Parliament is due to vote on discharge to EU decentralised agencies and joint research undertakings for their implementation of the 2017 budget. The Committee on Budgetary Control (CONT) proposes to grant discharge to all joint undertakings and agencies, save for the European Asylum Support Office whose discharge would be postponed due to serious irregularities.

During the March II plenary session, Parliament is due to vote on discharge to EU decentralised agencies and joint research undertakings for their implementation of the 2017 budget. The Committee on Budgetary Control (CONT) proposes to grant discharge to all joint undertakings and agencies, save for the European Asylum Support Office whose discharge would be postponed due to serious irregularities.

Copyright in the digital single market

22-03-2019

The European Commission presented a legislative package for the modernisation of the EU copyright rules, including a new directive on copyright in the digital single market on 14 September 2016. Stakeholders and academics have been strongly divided on the proposal. In February 2019, after more than two years of protracted negotiations, the co-legislators agreed on a new set of copyright rules including two controversial provisions: 1) the creation of a new right that will allow press publishers to ...

The European Commission presented a legislative package for the modernisation of the EU copyright rules, including a new directive on copyright in the digital single market on 14 September 2016. Stakeholders and academics have been strongly divided on the proposal. In February 2019, after more than two years of protracted negotiations, the co-legislators agreed on a new set of copyright rules including two controversial provisions: 1) the creation of a new right that will allow press publishers to claim remuneration for the online use of their publications (Article 11), and 2) the imposition of content monitoring measures on online platforms such as YouTube, which seeks to resolve the 'value gap' and help rights-holders to better monetise and control the distribution of their content online (Article 13). Furthermore, in addition to the mandatory exception for text and data mining for research purposes proposed by the Commission in its proposal, the co-legislators agreed to enshrine in EU law another mandatory exception for general text and data mining (Article 3a) in order to contribute to the development of data analytics and artificial intelligence. In February 2019, Coreper endorsed the compromise text on behalf of the Member States, and the Legal Affairs Committee (JURI) approved it. The political agreement must now be voted in plenary by the European Parliament and formally adopted by the Council to finalise the legislative procedure. Fourth edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Road transport: Driving, breaks, rest times and tachographs

22-03-2019

The Driving Time and Tachograph Regulations were adopted to improve drivers' working conditions and road safety, as well as to enhance compliance with the rules, and competition between road operators. In the context of the European Commission's 2017 'Europe on the move' package, the current proposal aims to remedy the shortcomings of these regulations, on which a broad consensus has emerged: lack of clarity, non-uniform implementation, insufficient enforcement and a need for strengthened cooperation ...

The Driving Time and Tachograph Regulations were adopted to improve drivers' working conditions and road safety, as well as to enhance compliance with the rules, and competition between road operators. In the context of the European Commission's 2017 'Europe on the move' package, the current proposal aims to remedy the shortcomings of these regulations, on which a broad consensus has emerged: lack of clarity, non-uniform implementation, insufficient enforcement and a need for strengthened cooperation between Member States and authorities. In June 2018, Parliament's Committee on Transport and Tourism (TRAN) adopted a report and the mandate to start interinstitutional negotiations. However, during the June 2018 plenary session, Parliament did not endorse the mandate and in July it rejected the report, referring it back to the committee. The Council reached a general approach on this proposal in December 2018, under the Austrian Presidency. On 10 January 2019, the TRAN committee failed to reach a new agreement on the proposal for plenary. The coordinators then finally decided to recommend to the Conference of Presidents to place this proposal and the two other linked social mobility proposals on the plenary agenda for a new vote. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Road transport: Enforcement and special provisions for posted workers

22-03-2019

The EU has established a range of social measures applicable to the road transport sector, which aim at improving drivers' working conditions, road safety and competition. To give real substance to these measures, compliance is key. The 2006 Enforcement Directive was therefore adopted to effectively implement the social provisions of the Driving Time Regulation. The current proposal, published in the context of the European Commission's 2017 'Europe on the move' initiative, seeks to remedy some shortcomings ...

The EU has established a range of social measures applicable to the road transport sector, which aim at improving drivers' working conditions, road safety and competition. To give real substance to these measures, compliance is key. The 2006 Enforcement Directive was therefore adopted to effectively implement the social provisions of the Driving Time Regulation. The current proposal, published in the context of the European Commission's 2017 'Europe on the move' initiative, seeks to remedy some shortcomings of the Enforcement Directive, such as non-uniform implementation. Additionally, it puts forward specific rules on the posting of workers in the road sector, to respond to concerns raised regarding the inadequacy of the Posting of Workers Directive, when applied to the road transport sector. The European Parliament's Committee on Transport and Tourism (TRAN) adopted its report and a mandate to start interinstitutional negotiations in June 2018. However, Parliament did not endorse the mandate and then, in July 2018, rejected the report, referring it back to the TRAN committee. The Council agreed a general approach on this proposal in December 2018, under the Austrian Presidency. In January 2019, the TRAN committee failed to reach an agreement on a compromise proposal. The coordinators then finally decided to recommend to the Conference of Presidents to place this proposal and the two other linked social mobility proposals on the plenary agenda for a new vote. Third edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Access to the occupation of road transport operator and to the international road haulage market

22-03-2019

The regulations on admission to the occupation of road transport operator and on access to the international road transport market have been contributing to the functioning of EU road transport and fair competition between resident and non-resident hauliers since December 2011. Despite the improvements they have brought to the sector, however, persistent shortcomings such as diverging national application of the rules and uneven enforcement called for a revision of both acts. On 31 May 2017, as part ...

The regulations on admission to the occupation of road transport operator and on access to the international road transport market have been contributing to the functioning of EU road transport and fair competition between resident and non-resident hauliers since December 2011. Despite the improvements they have brought to the sector, however, persistent shortcomings such as diverging national application of the rules and uneven enforcement called for a revision of both acts. On 31 May 2017, as part of a 'mobility package', the European Commission adopted a new proposal to address the main shortcomings affecting the sector, and improve its competitiveness and efficiency. In June 2018, Parliament's Committee on Transport and Tourism (TRAN) adopted its report and a negotiating mandate for trilogue. However, Parliament did not endorse the mandate and in July 2018, rejected the report, referring it back to the committee. On 10 January 2019, the TRAN committee adopted a compromise proposal but failed to reach an agreement on the two linked files on driving times and posting. The coordinators finally decided to recommend to the Conference of Presidents to place this proposal and the two other linked social mobility proposals on the plenary agenda for a new vote. The Council reached a general approach on the three proposals in December 2018, under the Austrian Presidency. Third edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Tulevat tapahtumat

01-04-2019
NATO at 70 and CSDP at 20: The future of European security and defence
Muu tapahtuma -
EPRS
02-04-2019
Women’s Role in Peace Processes including the specific case of Western Balkans
Kuulemistilaisuus -
FEMM
02-04-2019
Workshop on Conflicts of Interest
Seminaari -
PETI

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