23

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Päivämäärä

Access to the occupation of road transport operator and to the international road haulage market

08-04-2019

The regulations on admission to the occupation of road transport operator and on access to the international road transport market have been contributing to the functioning of EU road transport and fair competition between resident and non-resident hauliers since December 2011. Despite the improvements they have brought to the sector, however, persistent shortcomings such as diverging national application of the rules and uneven enforcement called for a revision of both acts. On 31 May 2017, as part ...

The regulations on admission to the occupation of road transport operator and on access to the international road transport market have been contributing to the functioning of EU road transport and fair competition between resident and non-resident hauliers since December 2011. Despite the improvements they have brought to the sector, however, persistent shortcomings such as diverging national application of the rules and uneven enforcement called for a revision of both acts. On 31 May 2017, as part of a 'mobility package', the European Commission adopted a new proposal to address the main shortcomings affecting the sector, and improve its competitiveness and efficiency. In June 2018, Parliament's Committee on Transport and Tourism (TRAN) adopted its report and a negotiating mandate for trilogue. However, Parliament did not endorse the mandate and in July 2018, rejected the report, referring it back to the committee. In the meantime, the Council reached a general approach on the three proposals in the package, in December 2018. On 10 January 2019, the TRAN committee adopted a compromise proposal but failed to reach an agreement on the two linked files on driving times and posting. In March, the Conference of Presidents decided to include this file on the agenda of the March II plenary session. After procedural complications, Parliament adopted its first-reading position during the subsequent plenary session, on 4 April 2019.

RESEARCH FOR CULT COMMITTEE – Recognition of qualifications for educational and professional purposes: the impact of Brexit

26-11-2018

The United Kingdom (UK) will leave the European Union next 29 March 2019. The potential impact of the UK’s withdrawal from the European Union on the recognition of qualifications depends on the nature of the qualifications as different regulatory regimes apply to academic as against professional qualifications. In the case of academic qualifications, this issue falls within national competence, although supporting policies have been implemented at European level. Brexit should not have substantial ...

The United Kingdom (UK) will leave the European Union next 29 March 2019. The potential impact of the UK’s withdrawal from the European Union on the recognition of qualifications depends on the nature of the qualifications as different regulatory regimes apply to academic as against professional qualifications. In the case of academic qualifications, this issue falls within national competence, although supporting policies have been implemented at European level. Brexit should not have substantial consequences since those policies are intergovernmental (e.g. Bologna Process), implemented on a voluntary basis (e.g. European Qualifications Framework, Europass) or open to third countries (e.g. Erasmus+). By contrast, the question of professional qualifications is closely related to the single market and to the free movement of workers, services and establishment. Hence, a number of European directives govern the field of regulated professions. If the UK becomes a third country from 30 March 2019 or at the end of the transition period provided for in the “Draft Withdrawal Agreement”, this legislation will no longer apply either to EU citizens seeking recognition of their qualifications in the UK or to UK citizens seeking recognition of their qualifications in the European Union.

Professional Qualifications Directive

31-08-2017

On 11 May 2017, the Conference of Presidents of the European Parliament authorised its Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection (IMCO) to draw up a report on the implementation of Directive 2005/36/EC regarding regulation and the need for reform in professional services. The timetable envisaged for the preparation of this report was then adapted to the one for the report on the legislative proposal for a proportionality test before adoption of new regulation of professions, also being ...

On 11 May 2017, the Conference of Presidents of the European Parliament authorised its Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection (IMCO) to draw up a report on the implementation of Directive 2005/36/EC regarding regulation and the need for reform in professional services. The timetable envisaged for the preparation of this report was then adapted to the one for the report on the legislative proposal for a proportionality test before adoption of new regulation of professions, also being dealt with by IMCO (rapporteur: Andreas Schwab, EPP, Germany). Due to the limited time consequently available for conducting research on this dossier, this short briefing paper – rather than a full European Implementation Assessment, as is the usual procedure in the case of implementation reports – is hereby provided to the IMCO Members. The scope of this 'Implementation in Action' briefing, covering the history of EU regulation of professions, application of Article 59 of the Professional Qualifications Directive, and the restrictiveness indicator used by the European Commission, was agreed with the IMCO committee secretariat following consultation with the office of the rapporteur (Nicola Danti, S&D, Italy).

Access to the occupation of road transport operator and to the international road haulage market

15-03-2017

Regulation (EC) No 1071/2009 and Regulation (EC) No 1072/2009 set out a common legal framework to access road transport operator business and the road haulage market. The different analyses and studies carried out at European level show that the two regulations had positive effects on the internal market (such as harmonisation, introduction of quantitative criteria, clarification of terms, linking of the international cabotage to international carriage operations) and are an appropriate tool to deal ...

Regulation (EC) No 1071/2009 and Regulation (EC) No 1072/2009 set out a common legal framework to access road transport operator business and the road haulage market. The different analyses and studies carried out at European level show that the two regulations had positive effects on the internal market (such as harmonisation, introduction of quantitative criteria, clarification of terms, linking of the international cabotage to international carriage operations) and are an appropriate tool to deal with this issue. Nevertheless, several shortcomings were identified, considerably limiting the efficiency of the two legislative acts. Improvements are therefore needed, in particular regarding cabotage performance, rules enforcement, clarifying problematic terms, letterbox companies, and infringements. At the same time, harmonising the issues interpreted differently by Member States will benefit the market as a whole. The situations experienced by stakeholders, as well as best practices, could provide useful input for future approaches in this field. Beyond specific provisions and particular issues to be clarified and/or improved, the existing evaluations show that the most appropriate approach for the future would be a progressive opening of the haulage market and a deeper harmonisation at economic, legal and social level across the European Union.