European Solidarity Corps

11-09-2018

The Commission launched the European Solidarity Corps in a December 2016 communication, and the present proposal for a regulation would set its legal basis, define the budgetary and implementation arrangements, specify objectives and define key terms. The Corps would have a volunteering strand on the one hand and a smaller occupational strand (traineeships and jobs) on the other. All placements focus on solidarity actions and will last between 2 to 12 months. The proposal set a target of 100 000 participants, with a proposed budget of €341.5 million, for the 2018-2020 period. In its resolution on the issue in April 2017, the European Parliament had insisted that the initiative should not drain other programmes. Notwithstanding that, the Commission proposed that only 25 % of the budget would be new money. Parliament reiterated its position in its resolution of July 2017 and again in the report adopted by the CULT committee ahead of trilogue negotiations. Council, however, came to the negotiating table seeking a budget that was totally dependent on redeployments. Finally, the European Parliament negotiators managed to secure €76 million (20 %) fresh money, complemented by a redistribution that favours volunteering more strongly, and the inclusion of safeguards to avoid exploitation for profit-making purposes. Second edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

The Commission launched the European Solidarity Corps in a December 2016 communication, and the present proposal for a regulation would set its legal basis, define the budgetary and implementation arrangements, specify objectives and define key terms. The Corps would have a volunteering strand on the one hand and a smaller occupational strand (traineeships and jobs) on the other. All placements focus on solidarity actions and will last between 2 to 12 months. The proposal set a target of 100 000 participants, with a proposed budget of €341.5 million, for the 2018-2020 period. In its resolution on the issue in April 2017, the European Parliament had insisted that the initiative should not drain other programmes. Notwithstanding that, the Commission proposed that only 25 % of the budget would be new money. Parliament reiterated its position in its resolution of July 2017 and again in the report adopted by the CULT committee ahead of trilogue negotiations. Council, however, came to the negotiating table seeking a budget that was totally dependent on redeployments. Finally, the European Parliament negotiators managed to secure €76 million (20 %) fresh money, complemented by a redistribution that favours volunteering more strongly, and the inclusion of safeguards to avoid exploitation for profit-making purposes. Second edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.