Cost of Non-Europe in the Single Market for transport and tourism: road transport and railways (Annex I)

28-10-2014

Cost of Non-Europe Reports identify the possibilities for economic or other gains and/or the realisation of a ‘public good’ through common action at EU level in specific policy areas and sectors. This Cost of Non-Europe Report seeks to analyse the costs for citizens, businesses and relevant stake-holders of remaining gaps and barriers in the Single Market in transports, as well as to examine the benefits from further action in the tourism sector. This particular study - the first in a series - focuses on the potential benefits of completing the single market in the rail and road sectors. First, it highlights what the progress has been to date in terms of legislative actions. Secondly it seeks to evaluate in a qualitative and (where possible) quantitative manner the impact of filling the remaining gaps in legislation. The study focuses, in particular, on those areas where liberalisation has started but has not been completed, and those where markets are not functioning effectively – that is, where legislation is not currently being envisaged, but where it is likely that intervention will be needed in future.

Cost of Non-Europe Reports identify the possibilities for economic or other gains and/or the realisation of a ‘public good’ through common action at EU level in specific policy areas and sectors. This Cost of Non-Europe Report seeks to analyse the costs for citizens, businesses and relevant stake-holders of remaining gaps and barriers in the Single Market in transports, as well as to examine the benefits from further action in the tourism sector. This particular study - the first in a series - focuses on the potential benefits of completing the single market in the rail and road sectors. First, it highlights what the progress has been to date in terms of legislative actions. Secondly it seeks to evaluate in a qualitative and (where possible) quantitative manner the impact of filling the remaining gaps in legislation. The study focuses, in particular, on those areas where liberalisation has started but has not been completed, and those where markets are not functioning effectively – that is, where legislation is not currently being envisaged, but where it is likely that intervention will be needed in future.

Auteur externe

This study has been written by Francesco Dionori, Roberta Frisoni, Simon Ellis, Lydia Rooney, Davide Ranghetti, Federico Spano and Elisa Tejedor of Steer Davies Gleave at the request of the European Added Value Unit, of the Directorate for Impact Assessment and European Added Value, within the Directorate-General for European Parliamentary Research Services of the European Parliament.