Implications of Global Trends in Eating Habits for Climate Change, Health and Natural Resources

15-04-2009

The study outlines the contribution of livestock production to climate change and health risks associated w i t h high meat consumption. The natural resources required to produce animalbased and plant-based protein are contrasted and diets with different levels of both types of protein compared. Using world population projections, three scenarios based on different theoretical alternative consumption patterns are created to show possible requirements and greenhouse gas emissions for animal and plant protein production: “minimal” scenario (assumes consumption of animal protein only via milk and eggs); “optimal” scenario (assuming diets with a low meat intake) and “maximum” (baseline) scenario (current level of meat consumption extended to developing countries). Comments are made on alternative protein sources. Policy options are suggested.

The study outlines the contribution of livestock production to climate change and health risks associated w i t h high meat consumption. The natural resources required to produce animalbased and plant-based protein are contrasted and diets with different levels of both types of protein compared. Using world population projections, three scenarios based on different theoretical alternative consumption patterns are created to show possible requirements and greenhouse gas emissions for animal and plant protein production: “minimal” scenario (assumes consumption of animal protein only via milk and eggs); “optimal” scenario (assuming diets with a low meat intake) and “maximum” (baseline) scenario (current level of meat consumption extended to developing countries). Comments are made on alternative protein sources. Policy options are suggested.