28

résultat(s)

Mot(s)
Type de publication
Domaine politique
Mot-clé
Date

The European Year for Development: Demography and Migration

27-08-2015

If current trends continue, the world will have 9.7 billion inhabitants in 2050, but population growth will be unevenly distributed. The 1994 Cairo International Conference on Population and Development was a milestone that focused on the well-being of individuals, rather than numerical targets. There has been progress promoting human rights, education, gender equality, sexual and reproductive health, and reproductive rights, but rapid urbanisation and climate change represent new challenges. The ...

If current trends continue, the world will have 9.7 billion inhabitants in 2050, but population growth will be unevenly distributed. The 1994 Cairo International Conference on Population and Development was a milestone that focused on the well-being of individuals, rather than numerical targets. There has been progress promoting human rights, education, gender equality, sexual and reproductive health, and reproductive rights, but rapid urbanisation and climate change represent new challenges. The international community has recognised the need to promote regular, safe and orderly international migration to harness the potential benefits of migration. Contrary to widespread views, emigration rates rise with economic development until countries reach an upper middle income status. The role migration plays in spurring development should be more widely recognised. Human mobility will be integrated in the post-2015 development agenda, and the Sustainable Development Goals will include migrationrelated targets. The EU is addressing the migration-development nexus in its Global Approach to Migration and Mobility, which is implemented through policy dialogues and cooperation projects in third countries. The European Parliament has insisted that the rights of migrants – particularly women – be part of the post-2015 agenda.

The European Year for Development:Children and Youth

01-07-2015

Nearly half of all people living in extreme poverty are aged 18 or under. Children and young people are particularly vulnerable to social exclusion, violence and abuse. In 2014 the European Parliament called on the High Representative of the Union to report back to Parliament every year on the results of the EU's child-focused external action. The Parliament had also previously underlined the urgent need for the Union to pay special attention to the most vulnerable and socially excluded girls and ...

Nearly half of all people living in extreme poverty are aged 18 or under. Children and young people are particularly vulnerable to social exclusion, violence and abuse. In 2014 the European Parliament called on the High Representative of the Union to report back to Parliament every year on the results of the EU's child-focused external action. The Parliament had also previously underlined the urgent need for the Union to pay special attention to the most vulnerable and socially excluded girls and boys. International commitments to improve the lives of children are reflected in various Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), particularly the one on infant mortality. One in four children under five (162 million) remains stunted, risking diminished cognitive and physical development. The Parliament recently called on the Commission to scale up its nutrition-specific commitments. The proposed Sustainable Development Goals include numerous targets to improve the situation of children and youth and represent an important leap forward.

The European Year for Development: Peace and Stability

07-05-2015

Conflict and poverty have a circular relation: violence negatively affects development and vice versa – poverty is often one of the root causes of conflict. The EU has long recognised the need for conflict prevention, resolution and peace building, as well as for addressing the root causes of conflict, which include poverty, weak governance and human rights abuses. The EU increasingly works to better harmonise its security and development objectives, as well as to coordinate its external policy tools ...

Conflict and poverty have a circular relation: violence negatively affects development and vice versa – poverty is often one of the root causes of conflict. The EU has long recognised the need for conflict prevention, resolution and peace building, as well as for addressing the root causes of conflict, which include poverty, weak governance and human rights abuses. The EU increasingly works to better harmonise its security and development objectives, as well as to coordinate its external policy tools in a 'comprehensive approach'. The European Parliament (EP) has welcomed this coordination, while also asking that anti-poverty objectives not be marginalised, and that humanitarian aid not serve political ends. The EU has dedicated financial instruments for promoting peace; they include the African Peace Facility and the Instrument contributing to Security and Peace. The EP has also underscored the need for a long-term engagement with fragile states and for ensuring that women participate in resolving conflicts and building democracy.

The TTIP’s Potential Impact on Developing Countries: A Review of Existing Literature and Selected Issues

29-04-2015

The position and concerns of developing countries have only belatedly entered the discussion over the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). While poor countries may gain much from the positive effects of the TTIP, their precarious positions means that they may be less able to react and adapt to negative consequences. The EU is required to assess the development effects of its policies, including trade policies, by the Lisbon Treaty. Although the shape and scope of the final TTIP ...

The position and concerns of developing countries have only belatedly entered the discussion over the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). While poor countries may gain much from the positive effects of the TTIP, their precarious positions means that they may be less able to react and adapt to negative consequences. The EU is required to assess the development effects of its policies, including trade policies, by the Lisbon Treaty. Although the shape and scope of the final TTIP agreement is not yet known, economic analyses have identified different ways in which it could affect developing countries and influence the global trading system. Several economic studies have also attempted to measure the possible outcomes for different countries and regions. While it appears that the negative impact of trade diversion and preference erosion is likely to be small, there may be notable exceptions, including risks to the position of some countries in international value chains. Proposals to address such negative consequences include concrete measures for affected countries, such as extending unilateral preferences and shaping the TTIP in such a way as to facilitate positive effects. Extending the principle of mutual recognition or equivalence to third parties and defining liberal rules of origin in the agreement are particularly important.

Something New Out of Africa? Chinese, US and EU Strategies for the Continent

22-04-2015

The seventh College-to-College meeting between the European Commission and the African Union Commission underscores the close cooperation between the European Union (EU) and Africa. Institutional and political relations have intensified in recent years, coinciding with a renewed international interest in an African continent whose economic growth in the past decade has been remarkably strong. The United States (US) and China have also recently strengthened their links with Africa. While these three ...

The seventh College-to-College meeting between the European Commission and the African Union Commission underscores the close cooperation between the European Union (EU) and Africa. Institutional and political relations have intensified in recent years, coinciding with a renewed international interest in an African continent whose economic growth in the past decade has been remarkably strong. The United States (US) and China have also recently strengthened their links with Africa. While these three actors frame their relations with Africa in different ways, their interests converge around two broad areas: i) Africa’s economic potential and the need to intensify trade and investment to generate economic growth and development; and ii) concerns about peace and security – and notably the threats posed by armed conflict and terrorist groups. In light of this renewed international interest and other important factors – including the expiry of the Cotonou Agreement in 2020 – the European Parliament should embark on an ambitious and strategic political reflection on the EU’s relations with Africa. Parliament should recognise both the potential and vulnerabilities of the continent, as well as the EU’s own varied interests across policy areas. Alongside other actors, including the US and China, Parliament should also work to ensure that Africa finds its due place in the changing international order.

The European Year for Development: Education

12-02-2015

Access to quality education is essential for development: estimates suggest global poverty could drop by 12 % if all children in low income countries could read. The European Parliament has called for gender equality in education and for providing vulnerable groups special attention. The percentage of aid devoted to education has remained constant. While amounts increased between 2002 and 2010, they have begun to decline since. Global net enrolment for primary education grew from 83 % to 90 % between ...

Access to quality education is essential for development: estimates suggest global poverty could drop by 12 % if all children in low income countries could read. The European Parliament has called for gender equality in education and for providing vulnerable groups special attention. The percentage of aid devoted to education has remained constant. While amounts increased between 2002 and 2010, they have begun to decline since. Global net enrolment for primary education grew from 83 % to 90 % between 2000 and 2012. But progress is uneven: 58 million children are out of school, often because of poverty, location, gender or conflict. Half the children who do not attend school live in regions affected by conflict. The EU institutions spent EUR 4.2 billion on education in 2007-2013. The EP recognises the need to: • guarantee education for women and girls, • pay attention to emergency situations, and • build 'knowledge-based' societies that encourage citizens to participate.

The European Year for Development: Europe in the World

29-01-2015

The world has changed in recent years, in ways that have undermined the traditional development model. The new 'Sustainable Development Goals' (SDGs) – to be agreed in September 2015 by the UN – will need to reflect these new realities and emerging challenges. A majority of the world's poorest people live in developing countries, where aid represents only a small percentage of all development financing. Aid remains important: its exclusive goal is promoting development, and it composes a large share ...

The world has changed in recent years, in ways that have undermined the traditional development model. The new 'Sustainable Development Goals' (SDGs) – to be agreed in September 2015 by the UN – will need to reflect these new realities and emerging challenges. A majority of the world's poorest people live in developing countries, where aid represents only a small percentage of all development financing. Aid remains important: its exclusive goal is promoting development, and it composes a large share of low income countries' development financing. The EU's new development policy aims to focus aid on the poorest countries. The European Parliament (EP) has welcomed this, while warning about the criteria used to judged countries' need. Together, the EU and its Member States remain the world's largest donor, although they contribute far less than the 0.7 % of gross national income (GNI) to which Member States committed. The EP has called on the EU to meet its commitments and adopt concrete measures to make internal policies coherent with development objectives.

Relations ACP-UE après 2020 : État des lieux

01-12-2014

Le renouvellement des relations entre le groupe des États ACP et l'UE va acquérir majeure visibilité politique. Le groupe des États ACP a créé un Groupe des Éminentes Personnalités (GEP) pour examiner les options pour l'avenir du groupe et le scénario après-Cotonou. Le futur rapport du GEP proposera des recommandations réalistes, réalisables et accessibles, requérant un soutien politique au plus haut niveau. Le Commissaire de l'UE en charge de la coopération au développement a évoqué la possibilité ...

Le renouvellement des relations entre le groupe des États ACP et l'UE va acquérir majeure visibilité politique. Le groupe des États ACP a créé un Groupe des Éminentes Personnalités (GEP) pour examiner les options pour l'avenir du groupe et le scénario après-Cotonou. Le futur rapport du GEP proposera des recommandations réalistes, réalisables et accessibles, requérant un soutien politique au plus haut niveau. Le Commissaire de l'UE en charge de la coopération au développement a évoqué la possibilité de fixer des principes fondamentaux accordés avec les pays ACP, combinés à des programmes régionaux spécifiques. Des consultations publiques seront menées en 2015. On remarque une certaine division entre des États membres de l'UE en faveur du statu quo et ceux qui visent à la création d'un cadre nouveau pour ces relations. L'APP devrait s'assurer qu'une dimension parlementaire forte fasse partie du nouveau cadre - indépendamment de sa configuration finale. Une manifestation d'opinion ambitieuse de la part de l'APP jouerait un rôle important dans le remaniement des futures relations ACP-EU.

Commitments Made at the Hearing of Neven Mimica - Commissioner-Designate

14-11-2014

Neven Mimica, the recently-confirmed European Commissioner for International Cooperation and Development, appeared before the European Parliament's Committee on Development (DEVE) on 29 September 2014 to answer MEPs' questions. In that hearing and in his answers to the questionnaire prepared for the meeting, Commissioner Mimica made a number of statements of interest to the European Parliament. This document provides a summary of his most salient points.

Neven Mimica, the recently-confirmed European Commissioner for International Cooperation and Development, appeared before the European Parliament's Committee on Development (DEVE) on 29 September 2014 to answer MEPs' questions. In that hearing and in his answers to the questionnaire prepared for the meeting, Commissioner Mimica made a number of statements of interest to the European Parliament. This document provides a summary of his most salient points.

Commitments Made at the Hearings of the Commissioners-Designate, Juncker Commission (November 2014 - October 2019)

14-11-2014

This compilation of briefings presents the most salient points and essential commitments made by the commissioners-designate during the hearings held in September/October 2014 before the parliamentary committees. These commitments concern the main on-going legislative procedures, the preparation of future legislative proposals as well as the scrutiny of the implementation of existing legislation. They also touch upon the crucial issue of inter-institutional cooperation.

This compilation of briefings presents the most salient points and essential commitments made by the commissioners-designate during the hearings held in September/October 2014 before the parliamentary committees. These commitments concern the main on-going legislative procedures, the preparation of future legislative proposals as well as the scrutiny of the implementation of existing legislation. They also touch upon the crucial issue of inter-institutional cooperation.

Evénements à venir

01-10-2019
Health threats from climate change: Scientific evidence for policy-making
Autre événement -
EPRS

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