37

résultat(s)

Mot(s)
Type de publication
Domaine politique
Mot-clé
Date

A macro-regional strategy for the Carpathian region

18-10-2019

Encompassing regions from European Union (EU) Member States and third countries confronted with a common set of challenges, macro-regions are defined on the basis of geographical features. Whether inspired by a sense of regional identity, a desire to engage in closer cooperation or to pool resources, all macro-regional strategies share the aim of ensuring a coordinated approach to issues best addressed jointly. In spite of a broad consensus on the importance of the macro-regional strategies as a ...

Encompassing regions from European Union (EU) Member States and third countries confronted with a common set of challenges, macro-regions are defined on the basis of geographical features. Whether inspired by a sense of regional identity, a desire to engage in closer cooperation or to pool resources, all macro-regional strategies share the aim of ensuring a coordinated approach to issues best addressed jointly. In spite of a broad consensus on the importance of the macro-regional strategies as a relevant instrument for the optimal use of existing financial resources, some assessments indicate that stronger political ownership is needed. Currently the EU has four macro-regional strategies, covering the Baltic Sea region, the Danube region, the Adriatic-Ionian region and the Alpine region, which address common challenges and achieve economic, environmental, social and territorial cohesion. On occasion, calls are made to launch additional strategies, covering new geographical areas. Some Member States currently voice the need for a fifth macro-regional strategy, covering the Carpathian mountains, where the borders of many countries meet. The region suffers inherent weaknesses in fields such as transport, socio-economic development, innovation and energy supply, and needs to protect its rare and valuable natural resources and cultural heritage. The Polish government has presented a proposal for a common strategy for the Carpathian region to the European Commission, after consultation with several countries in the region. This draft plan has not yet been approved by all of the countries concerned. The Council remains open to any commonly agreed and mature initiative aimed at setting up a new macro-regional strategy; however it has not endorsed the creation of a macro-regional strategy for the Carpathian region. The Committee of the Regions explicitly supports the initiative to create an EU strategy for the Carpathian region. The European Commission and the European Parliament are more cautious when it comes to launching new strategies and suggest building on existing ones instead.

Implementing the Urban Agenda for the EU

02-10-2019

Our towns and cities are home to nearly three quarters of the EU's population, and most EU policies concern them, be it directly or indirectly. While the revised 2014-2020 cohesion policy framework introduced a number of new instruments intended to enhance the urban dimension of cohesion funding, a shared vision of urban development has gradually taken shape at inter-governmental level, accompanied by increasing calls to give city authorities and stakeholders a greater say in policy-making. To help ...

Our towns and cities are home to nearly three quarters of the EU's population, and most EU policies concern them, be it directly or indirectly. While the revised 2014-2020 cohesion policy framework introduced a number of new instruments intended to enhance the urban dimension of cohesion funding, a shared vision of urban development has gradually taken shape at inter-governmental level, accompanied by increasing calls to give city authorities and stakeholders a greater say in policy-making. To help guide these discussions, the European Commission launched a public consultation following its July 2014 communication on the urban dimension of EU policies. Its findings indicated broad support among city stakeholders for an Urban Agenda for the EU. The European Parliament also prepared an own-initiative report on the issue, as part of a process that would ultimately lead to the signing of the Pact of Amsterdam on 30 May 2016, a clear political commitment to deliver an Urban Agenda. With the pact providing for the creation of urban partnerships focusing on key urban themes, all partnerships are now in operation. A total of 12 partnerships have now drawn up action plans, allowing the partners involved to contribute to the design of future, or the revision of current, EU legislation. As many of these plans are currently at the implementation stage, this is leading to a series of concrete deliverables, helping to ensure that the Urban Agenda for the EU is making a real difference on the ground. Developments such as better coordination at the Commission on urban issues have further consolidated the Urban Agenda, yet challenges remain. In this context, the Commission's proposals for the cohesion framework post-2020, which include creating a European urban initiative to support the Urban Agenda, the imminent Commission assessment of Urban Agenda implementation and the planned renewal of the Leipzig Charter in 2020, all have the potential to strengthen the Urban Agenda. Successfully implementing the Urban Agenda, however, will ultimately depend on the partnerships' ability to deliver actions and on the extent to which they are taken up by the Commission, a process requiring full commitment from all partners involved.

Hearings of the Commissioners-designate: Elisa Ferreira - Cohesion and Reforms

26-09-2019

This briefing is one in a set looking at the Commissioners-designate and their portfolios as put forward by Commission President-elect Ursula von der Leyen. Each candidate faces a three-hour public hearing, organised by one or more parliamentary committees. After that process, those committees will judge the candidates' suitability for the role based on 'their general competence, European commitment and personal independence', as well as their 'knowledge of their prospective portfolio and their communication ...

This briefing is one in a set looking at the Commissioners-designate and their portfolios as put forward by Commission President-elect Ursula von der Leyen. Each candidate faces a three-hour public hearing, organised by one or more parliamentary committees. After that process, those committees will judge the candidates' suitability for the role based on 'their general competence, European commitment and personal independence', as well as their 'knowledge of their prospective portfolio and their communication skills'. At the end of the hearings process, Parliament votes on the proposed Commission as a bloc, and under the Treaties may only reject the entire College of Commissioners, rather than individual candidates. The Briefing provides an overview of key issues in the portfolio areas, as well as Parliament's activity in the last term in that field. It also includes a brief introduction to the candidate.

Les politiques de l’Union – Au service des citoyens: Politique régionale

28-06-2019

La politique régionale de l’Union, également appelée politique de cohésion, a pour objectif principal de réduire les déséquilibres territoriaux, sociaux et économiques entre les différentes régions de l’Union européenne. Elle couvre toutes les régions et toutes les villes de l’Union et favorise la création d’emplois, la compétitivité des entreprises, la croissance économique, le développement durable et l’amélioration de la qualité de vie des citoyens. Pour atteindre ces objectifs et répondre aux ...

La politique régionale de l’Union, également appelée politique de cohésion, a pour objectif principal de réduire les déséquilibres territoriaux, sociaux et économiques entre les différentes régions de l’Union européenne. Elle couvre toutes les régions et toutes les villes de l’Union et favorise la création d’emplois, la compétitivité des entreprises, la croissance économique, le développement durable et l’amélioration de la qualité de vie des citoyens. Pour atteindre ces objectifs et répondre aux besoins les plus variés en matière de développement dans l’ensemble des régions de l’Union, un montant de 351,8 milliards d’euros – près d’un tiers du budget total de l’Union européenne – a été prévu au titre de la politique de cohésion pour la période 2014-2020. Ce soutien financier est apporté au moyen de deux fonds principaux: le Fonds européen de développement régional (FEDER) et le Fonds de cohésion (FC). Ces deux fonds, ainsi que le Fonds social européen (FSE), le Fonds européen agricole pour le développement rural (Feader) et le Fonds européen pour les affaires maritimes et la pêche (FEAMP), forment les Fonds structurels et d’investissement européens (Fonds ESI). Cet ensemble de fonds offre un soutien qui peut réellement changer la vie des citoyens dans les régions de l’Union. Alors que la période de programmation actuelle (2014-2020) touche à sa fin, des travaux sont actuellement engagés afin de définir les priorités de la politique de cohésion pour la prochaine période de programmation (2020-2027). Au cours de la législature 2014-2019, le Parlement européen a été amené, à de nombreuses reprises, à adopter de nouveaux actes législatifs, à modifier des règles préexistantes et à fournir des avis sur de nombreux sujets qui touchent à la politique régionale de l’Union. Au sein du Parlement européen, la politique de développement régional et de cohésion de l’Union, telle que définie par les traités, relève de la compétence de la commission du développement régional (REGI). S’il quitte l’Union européenne comme prévu, le Royaume-Uni, qui était jusqu’alors un contributeur net au budget de l’Union, ne contribuera plus au budget de l’Union après 2020. L’Union disposera donc de moins de ressources pour financer ses politiques, notamment la politique de cohésion. Le Parlement européen a toutefois vigoureusement défendu le maintien, voire l’augmentation, du niveau de financement actuel en faveur de la politique de cohésion. Cette note d’information est une révision d’un document publié avant les élections européennes de 2019.

Transnational clusters and the Danube macro-regional strategy

18-03-2019

As geographical concentrations of enterprises, which work together in the same field to develop a high level of expertise, services and skills, clusters are hotbeds of innovation and play an important role in the EU economy. Known as transnational clusters when they involve actors from two or more countries in the same geographical area, clusters tend to generate higher employment growth than firms located outside clusters, and are estimated to account for a significant proportion of jobs in the ...

As geographical concentrations of enterprises, which work together in the same field to develop a high level of expertise, services and skills, clusters are hotbeds of innovation and play an important role in the EU economy. Known as transnational clusters when they involve actors from two or more countries in the same geographical area, clusters tend to generate higher employment growth than firms located outside clusters, and are estimated to account for a significant proportion of jobs in the European Union. Linking countries from across a wide geographical region, the EU's macro-regional strategies provide a useful framework to support transnational clusters. Launched in December 2010, the EU strategy for the Danube region (EUDSR) covers 14 countries that differ both in terms of their development and their relationship with the EU, including nine EU Member States and five third countries. With one of the major challenges in the Danube region being the uneven levels of innovation performance between the highly developed western part of the region and the less-developed east, transnational clusters have the potential to help redress this balance and to increase regional competiveness. The development of clusters is firmly supported by the EUSDR's action plan, which outlines a number of actions to foster clusters across the Danube region. This has led to several cluster projects, with a particular emphasis on the bio-based and agri-food sectors, building on the expertise of local enterprises in this field. The European Commission and academic experts have welcomed the progress made in the development of clusters in the Danube region in recent years, yet challenges remain, with issues such as funding difficulties, the lack of visibility of macro-regional strategies and declining political commitment all causes for concern. Future discussions on the content of cohesion programmes post-2020 provide a golden opportunity to highlight the potential of macro-regional strategies for fostering regional development and how transnational clusters can contribute to this process. This briefing has been produced at the request of a member of the Committee of the Regions, in the framework of the Cooperation Agreement between the Parliament and the Committee.

Mechanism to resolve legal and administrative obstacles in a cross-border context

25-01-2019

Often isolated, and with generally poorer access to public services, the EU's border regions face a unique set of challenges. This has been recognised under Article 174 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, which provides that particular attention should be paid to cross-border regions when developing action to strengthen the EU's economic, social and territorial cohesion. Yet while the EU has provided significant support over the years, particularly within the framework of European ...

Often isolated, and with generally poorer access to public services, the EU's border regions face a unique set of challenges. This has been recognised under Article 174 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, which provides that particular attention should be paid to cross-border regions when developing action to strengthen the EU's economic, social and territorial cohesion. Yet while the EU has provided significant support over the years, particularly within the framework of European territorial cooperation, helping to strengthen connectivity and create new growth and jobs, numerous obstacles continue to hamper cross-border cooperation. Organised to identify these remaining bottlenecks, the Commission's 2015 cross-border review revealed legal and administrative barriers to be the main obstacle to cross-border cooperation while, in parallel, the 2015 Luxembourg Presidency put forward plans for an EU cross-border mechanism, with an informal working group set up to develop the idea. Both processes have fed into discussions in recent years to create a mechanism for cross-border areas, leading to the current proposal, introduced as part of the multiannual financial framework's cohesion policy package. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

European Union Solidarity Fund

28-06-2018

Established in 2002 to support disaster-stricken regions, the European Union Solidarity Fund (EUSF) complements the efforts of public authorities by helping to fund vital emergency and recovery operations in areas affected by catastrophes such as flooding, earthquakes or forest fires. With an annual budget of €500 million, EUSF funding is granted following an application from a Member State or candidate country, and may be used to finance measures including restoring infrastructure to working order ...

Established in 2002 to support disaster-stricken regions, the European Union Solidarity Fund (EUSF) complements the efforts of public authorities by helping to fund vital emergency and recovery operations in areas affected by catastrophes such as flooding, earthquakes or forest fires. With an annual budget of €500 million, EUSF funding is granted following an application from a Member State or candidate country, and may be used to finance measures including restoring infrastructure to working order, providing temporary accommodation or cleaning up disaster areas. Although a revision of the EUSF Regulation took place in 2014, simplifying rules and clarifying eligibility criteria, several problems still remain. European Commission reports on the EUSF have drawn attention to the long waiting time countries still face before receiving EUSF funding, while industry experts also point to the risk that the EUSF could run out of funding in the event of several large disasters taking place within a short space of time. With a number of major natural disasters occurring over the past years, the EUSF has attracted renewed attention, leading the European Commission to put forward new proposals addressing the issue of post-disaster support. Parliament was also actively involved in these discussions, adopting a resolution on the EUSF in December 2016 which included several measures aimed at improving its operations, also calling on Member States to use ESI funds to invest in disaster prevention. Recent developments, such as new rules that allow reconstruction operations to be financed under the European Regional Development Fund and the proposal for a reinforced Civil Protection Mechanism, have helped create greater coherence between the EUSF and other EU measures. Perhaps most importantly, by complementing the work of the EUSF, these measures have the potential to improve the effectiveness of the EU's disaster prevention and response operations. The planned increase in the EUSF budget outlined under the recent MFF proposal can also help contribute to this process by strengthening the EUSF's response capacity, yet these plans will be subject to tough negotiations in the Council and Parliament. The next few months will arguably be of critical importance for ensuring the continued strength of the EU's disaster response capabilities and, in particular, the EUSF's role within this process. This is an updated edition of a Briefing published in January 2017, PE 595.896.

Harnessing the potential of the Urban Agenda for the EU

27-06-2018

Our towns and cities are home to nearly three quarters of the EU's population, and most EU policies concern them, be it directly or indirectly. While the revised 2014-2020 cohesion policy framework introduced a number of new instruments intended to enhance the urban dimension of cohesion funding, a shared vision of urban development has gradually taken shape at inter-governmental level, accompanied by increasing calls to give city authorities and stakeholders a greater say in policymaking. To help ...

Our towns and cities are home to nearly three quarters of the EU's population, and most EU policies concern them, be it directly or indirectly. While the revised 2014-2020 cohesion policy framework introduced a number of new instruments intended to enhance the urban dimension of cohesion funding, a shared vision of urban development has gradually taken shape at inter-governmental level, accompanied by increasing calls to give city authorities and stakeholders a greater say in policymaking. To help guide these discussions, the European Commission launched a public consultation following its July 2014 communications on the urban dimension of EU policies. Its findings indicated broad support among city stakeholders for an Urban Agenda for the EU. The European Parliament also prepared an own-initiative report on the issue, as part of a process that would ultimately lead to the signing of the Pact of Amsterdam on 30 May 2016, a clear political commitment to deliver an Urban Agenda. With the pact providing for the creation of 12 urban partnerships focusing on key urban themes, all partnerships are now in operation. Developments such as improved coordination within the Commission on urban issues and new resources including a permanent secretariat have consolidated the Urban Agenda, yet challenges remain. The Commission's proposals for the cohesion framework post-2020, which include the creation of a European urban initiative to support the Urban Agenda, have the potential to further strengthen the Urban Agenda but these plans will be subject to tough negotiations in the months ahead. Ultimately, the success of the Urban Agenda will depend on the partnerships' ability to deliver concrete action plans and on the extent to which they are taken up by the Commission, a process requiring full commitment from all the partners. This Briefing is a further update of an earlier one originally published in June 2016, PE 614.595.

Promouvoir le transport durable et supprimer les entraves dans les infrastructures de réseaux essentielles

25-04-2018

Dans la perspective des prochaines propositions de la Commission sur le nouveau cadre financier pluriannuel, qui devraient être présentées en mai 2018, la période de session de mai I devrait être l’occasion d’examiner un rapport d’initiative qui évalue la mise en œuvre de la politique de cohésion et l’objectif thématique consistant à promouvoir le transport durable et à supprimer les goulets d’étranglement dans les infrastructures de réseaux essentielles, et qui contient des recommandations pour ...

Dans la perspective des prochaines propositions de la Commission sur le nouveau cadre financier pluriannuel, qui devraient être présentées en mai 2018, la période de session de mai I devrait être l’occasion d’examiner un rapport d’initiative qui évalue la mise en œuvre de la politique de cohésion et l’objectif thématique consistant à promouvoir le transport durable et à supprimer les goulets d’étranglement dans les infrastructures de réseaux essentielles, et qui contient des recommandations pour la période postérieure à 2020.

European territorial cooperation

23-03-2018

Established in 1990, the first European territorial cooperation initiative, Interreg I, focused on cross-border cooperation. Action in this area has expanded over the years to cover broader initiatives such as trans-national cooperation, involving countries from wider geographical areas, and inter-regional cooperation, which brings together regions from across the whole EU. These three strands together make up European territorial cooperation, which is one of the two main goals of cohesion policy ...

Established in 1990, the first European territorial cooperation initiative, Interreg I, focused on cross-border cooperation. Action in this area has expanded over the years to cover broader initiatives such as trans-national cooperation, involving countries from wider geographical areas, and inter-regional cooperation, which brings together regions from across the whole EU. These three strands together make up European territorial cooperation, which is one of the two main goals of cohesion policy today. With the removal of Europe's frontier posts, travelling across borders has become second nature for millions of European citizens. European territorial cooperation has brought Europeans closer together, strengthened connectivity and improved the natural environment, supported by EU mechanisms such as the European groupings of territorial cooperation, and macro-regional strategies. Yet despite these achievements, numerous obstacles to closer cooperation still remain, such as divergent national rules in the areas of employment, healthcare and social security. Recent years have witnessed increased calls to address these hurdles, with the 2015 Luxembourg EU Presidency putting forward a proposal for a new instrument for cross-border projects, and the European Commission organising a cross-border review to identify remaining bottlenecks in the area, leading to a 2017 communication on boosting growth and cohesion in EU border regions. The European Parliament has also adopted a resolution on European territorial cooperation as part of this process. With discussions under way on the future of cohesion policy, there is general agreement on the importance of strengthening Interreg beyond 2020. Yet despite the many achievements of this policy over the years, continued EU support for European territorial cooperation is arguably critical, with the partial reintroduction of border controls in recent years revealing just how fragile territorial cooperation can be. This is an updated edition of a briefing from September 2016: PE 586.666.

Evénements à venir

20-11-2019
Europe's Future: Where next for EU institutional Reform?
Autre événement -
EPRS
21-11-2019
Looking back on 1989: The Fight for Freedom
Autre événement -
EPRS

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