295

résultat(s)

Mot(s)
Type de publication
Domaine politique
Auteur
Date

Ensuring more transparent and predictable working conditions

11-04-2019

An employer's obligation to inform their employees on the conditions applicable to their contracts is regulated by Directive 91/533/EEC. Major shifts in the labour market due to demographic trends and digitalisation, spawning a growing number of non-standard employment relationships, have made it necessary to revise the directive. The European Commission has responded to the need for change with a proposal aimed at updating and extending the information on employment-related obligations and working ...

An employer's obligation to inform their employees on the conditions applicable to their contracts is regulated by Directive 91/533/EEC. Major shifts in the labour market due to demographic trends and digitalisation, spawning a growing number of non-standard employment relationships, have made it necessary to revise the directive. The European Commission has responded to the need for change with a proposal aimed at updating and extending the information on employment-related obligations and working conditions, and at creating new minimum standards for all employed workers, including those on atypical contracts. In the European Parliament, the Committee for Employment and Social Affairs (EMPL) has adopted a report focused on the scope of the directive, on employees' working hours and the conditions for making information available to them, and on employers' responsibilities. The provisional agreement concluded in trilogue between European Parliament and the Council negotiators sets, among other things, new rules on the scope of the directive, the date of providing information, the length of probatory periods, and regulates working conditions in the case of variable working schedules. This agreement now needs to be approved by Parliament in plenary.

CO2 emission standards for heavy-duty vehicles

09-04-2019

In May 2018, the Commission proposed a regulation setting the first-ever CO2 emission performance standards for new heavy-duty vehicles in the EU, as part of the third mobility package. It would require the average CO2 emissions from new trucks in 2025 to be 15 % lower than in 2019. For 2030, the proposal sets an indicative reduction target of at least 30 % compared to 2019. Special incentives are provided for zero- and low-emission vehicles. The proposed regulation applies to four categories of ...

In May 2018, the Commission proposed a regulation setting the first-ever CO2 emission performance standards for new heavy-duty vehicles in the EU, as part of the third mobility package. It would require the average CO2 emissions from new trucks in 2025 to be 15 % lower than in 2019. For 2030, the proposal sets an indicative reduction target of at least 30 % compared to 2019. Special incentives are provided for zero- and low-emission vehicles. The proposed regulation applies to four categories of large trucks, which together account for 65 %-70 % of CO2 emissions from heavy-duty vehicles. The Commission proposes to review the legislation in 2022 in order to set a binding target for 2030, and to extend its application to smaller trucks, buses, coaches and trailers. In the European Parliament, the proposal was referred to the Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety, which adopted its report on 18 October 2018. Parliament voted on the report on 14 November 2018. Trilogue negotiations were concluded on 18 February 2019 with an agreement that sets a legally binding 30 % reduction target for the average fleet emissions of new trucks by 2030. The Parliament is expected to vote on the agreed text during the April II plenary session. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Interoperability between EU border and security information systems

22-03-2019

To enhance EU external border management and internal security, the European Commission has made several proposals to upgrade and expand European border and security information systems. As part of a broader process to maximise their use, the Commission presented legislative proposals for two regulations in December 2017 (amended in June 2018), establishing an interoperability framework between EU information systems on borders and visas, and on police and judicial cooperation, asylum and migration ...

To enhance EU external border management and internal security, the European Commission has made several proposals to upgrade and expand European border and security information systems. As part of a broader process to maximise their use, the Commission presented legislative proposals for two regulations in December 2017 (amended in June 2018), establishing an interoperability framework between EU information systems on borders and visas, and on police and judicial cooperation, asylum and migration. The proposals, agreed by the co-legislators on 5 February 2019, are scheduled for plenary vote in March 2019. They aim to provide competent authorities with fast, efficient, systematic and controlled access to the information they need. The new rules would improve checks at the EU’s external borders, allowing to better detect security threats and identity fraud, as well as help preventing and combating irregular migration. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Limits on exposure to carcinogens and mutagens at work: Second proposal

15-03-2019

The European Commission has proposed to amend Directive 2004/37/EC, by expanding its scope and by including and/or revising occupational exposure limit values for a number of cancer- or mutation-causing chemical agents. The initiative is proceeding in steps. The first proposal, submitted in May 2016, covered 13 priority chemical agents. The current (second) proposal addresses a further seven agents. Broad discussions with scientists and the social partners fed into both proposals. On the whole, trade ...

The European Commission has proposed to amend Directive 2004/37/EC, by expanding its scope and by including and/or revising occupational exposure limit values for a number of cancer- or mutation-causing chemical agents. The initiative is proceeding in steps. The first proposal, submitted in May 2016, covered 13 priority chemical agents. The current (second) proposal addresses a further seven agents. Broad discussions with scientists and the social partners fed into both proposals. On the whole, trade unions and employers welcomed the current proposal. Trilogue agreement was reached on 11 October 2018. As proposed by the European Parliament, diesel engine exhaust emissions were included in the scope of the directive. After completion of the legislative procedure, the final act was signed by the presidents of the co-legislators on 16 January 2019. Directive (EU) 2019/130 entered into force on 20 February 2019 and is to be transposed into national laws within two years, by 20 February 2021 at the latest. Third edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

The Audiovisual Media Services Directive

25-01-2019

Following political agreement with the Council, a vote in plenary on 2 October 2018 saw Parliament adopt the updated EU Audiovisual Media Services Directive, based on the proposal presented by the Commission on 25 May 2016. The overarching goal of the proposal was to bring about a balance between competitiveness and consumer protection. It therefore aimed to introduce flexibility when restrictions only applicable to TV are no longer justified, promote European films, protect minors and tackle hate ...

Following political agreement with the Council, a vote in plenary on 2 October 2018 saw Parliament adopt the updated EU Audiovisual Media Services Directive, based on the proposal presented by the Commission on 25 May 2016. The overarching goal of the proposal was to bring about a balance between competitiveness and consumer protection. It therefore aimed to introduce flexibility when restrictions only applicable to TV are no longer justified, promote European films, protect minors and tackle hate speech more efficiently. The proposal also reflected a new approach to online platforms. Following adoption of the revised directive, EU Member States now have to bring the new rules into national law by 19 September 2020. Sixth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Research for REGI Committee - Implementation of Cohesion Policy in the 2014-2020 Programming Period - January 2019 UPDATE

17-01-2019

The implementation timetable for cohesion policy is defined largely by its legislative framework, which explicitly provides for European Parliament involvement in a number of cases. In order to be able to plan parliamentary work and exercise systematic scrutiny of policy implementation and of the Commission’s work, it is essential to have an overview of the expected timing of different steps in policy implementation in the coming years. The briefing was first published in 2014, and has been updated ...

The implementation timetable for cohesion policy is defined largely by its legislative framework, which explicitly provides for European Parliament involvement in a number of cases. In order to be able to plan parliamentary work and exercise systematic scrutiny of policy implementation and of the Commission’s work, it is essential to have an overview of the expected timing of different steps in policy implementation in the coming years. The briefing was first published in 2014, and has been updated since then. The briefing includes a detailed (but non-exhaustive) timetable of policy actions connected with the implementation of the European Structural and Investment Funds in 2019, together with an overview of major actions for the remainder of the programming period, from 2020.

Reform of the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund

11-01-2019

The European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (EGF) was created in 2006 to finance active labour market policies targeting workers who have lost their jobs because of trade adjustment. The fund was subsequently modified in 2009 to cover major structural changes triggered by the economic and financial crisis. The rules of the EGF are laid down in EU Regulation (EU) No 1309/2013, which stipulates that the fund will continue to be financed until 31 December 2020. In May 2018, the European Commission submitted ...

The European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (EGF) was created in 2006 to finance active labour market policies targeting workers who have lost their jobs because of trade adjustment. The fund was subsequently modified in 2009 to cover major structural changes triggered by the economic and financial crisis. The rules of the EGF are laid down in EU Regulation (EU) No 1309/2013, which stipulates that the fund will continue to be financed until 31 December 2020. In May 2018, the European Commission submitted a proposal to reform the EGF and maintain it as a special instrument outside the MFF ceiling. The proposal introduces modifications to the eligibility criteria, the co-financing rules and the mobilisation procedure. The report was voted in the EMPL committee on 27 November 2018, and the report is due to be debated in plenary in January 2019, with a view to finalising Parliament's position for trilogue negotiations. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Single-use plastics and fishing gear: Reducing marine litter

28-11-2018

Most of the plastic in our oceans originates from land-based sources. On European beaches, plastics make up 80-85 % of marine litter, which is considered a major threat to marine and coastal biodiversity. Marine litter also costs the European Union economy an estimated €259 million to €695 million per year. In May 2018, the European Commission put forward a legislative proposal seeking to address the issue of marine litter from plastics. The proposal would introduce a series of measures regarding ...

Most of the plastic in our oceans originates from land-based sources. On European beaches, plastics make up 80-85 % of marine litter, which is considered a major threat to marine and coastal biodiversity. Marine litter also costs the European Union economy an estimated €259 million to €695 million per year. In May 2018, the European Commission put forward a legislative proposal seeking to address the issue of marine litter from plastics. The proposal would introduce a series of measures regarding the top 10 single-use plastics found on European beaches, as well as fishing gear, with a view to reducing their impact on the environment and ensuring a functional internal market. Both the European Parliament and the Council have adopted their position on the proposal. Interinstitutional trilogue negotiations started on 6 November 2018. Third edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Transposition of EU legislation into domestic law: Challenges faced by National Parliaments

21-11-2018

National Parliaments have emancipated themselves into the EU legislative process and have become more actively involved at the European level. This briefing provides an analysis of the role of National Parliaments in the process of transposition of EU legislation – a mere segment of the overall implementation process.

National Parliaments have emancipated themselves into the EU legislative process and have become more actively involved at the European level. This briefing provides an analysis of the role of National Parliaments in the process of transposition of EU legislation – a mere segment of the overall implementation process.

Auteur externe

Wim Voermans, Professor of Constitutional and Administrative Law, Leiden University

Financing bank resolution: An alternative solution for arranging the liquidity required

21-11-2018

Liquidity in resolution is one of the unresolved elements of the Single Resolution Mechanism. Currently, with the Single Resolution Fund (SRF) and the Eurosystem, there are two potential sources of liquidity in resolution, which both have clear limitations in use and amounts. Straightforward solutions to give the SRF and/or Eurosystem more firepower in resolution go against the main objectives of the resolution mechanism (i.e. breaking the sovereign-bank nexus and avoiding use of taxpayers’ money ...

Liquidity in resolution is one of the unresolved elements of the Single Resolution Mechanism. Currently, with the Single Resolution Fund (SRF) and the Eurosystem, there are two potential sources of liquidity in resolution, which both have clear limitations in use and amounts. Straightforward solutions to give the SRF and/or Eurosystem more firepower in resolution go against the main objectives of the resolution mechanism (i.e. breaking the sovereign-bank nexus and avoiding use of taxpayers’ money). This paper proposes an ECB liquidity facility with an SRF-guarantee as an alternative solution for banks in resolution. The funds available should be broadly sufficient to address potential liquidity needs for resolution tools. The proposed solution primarily requires agreement on the ESM-backstop for the SRF, a firmer commitment for (possible) future contributions for the SRF as well as a change to the current emergency liquidity assistance or introduction of a new dedicated Transitional Liquidity Assistance by the Eurosystem.

Auteur externe

W.P. De Groen, CEPS

Evénements à venir

25-06-2019
Meeting EU energy and climate goals: Energy storage for grids and low-carbon mobility
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