112

résultat(s)

Mot(s)
Type de publication
Domaine politique
Auteur
Date

Road transport: Driving, breaks, rest times and tachographs

08-04-2019

The Driving Time and Tachograph Regulations were adopted to improve drivers' working conditions and road safety, as well as to enhance compliance with the rules, and competition between road operators. In the context of the European Commission's 2017 'Europe on the move' package, the current proposal aims to remedy the shortcomings of these regulations, on which a broad consensus has emerged: lack of clarity, non-uniform implementation, insufficient enforcement and a need for strengthened cooperation ...

The Driving Time and Tachograph Regulations were adopted to improve drivers' working conditions and road safety, as well as to enhance compliance with the rules, and competition between road operators. In the context of the European Commission's 2017 'Europe on the move' package, the current proposal aims to remedy the shortcomings of these regulations, on which a broad consensus has emerged: lack of clarity, non-uniform implementation, insufficient enforcement and a need for strengthened cooperation between Member States and authorities. In June 2018, Parliament's Committee on Transport and Tourism (TRAN) adopted a report and the mandate to start interinstitutional negotiations. However, during the June 2018 plenary session, Parliament did not endorse the mandate and in July it rejected the report, referring it back to the committee. The Council reached a general approach on this proposal in December 2018, under the Austrian Presidency. On 10 January 2019, the TRAN committee failed to reach a new agreement on the proposal for plenary. In March, the Conference of Presidents decided to include this file on the agenda of the March II plenary session. After procedural complications, Parliament adopted its first-reading position during the subsequent plenary session, on 4 April 2019.

Copyright in the digital single market

22-03-2019

The European Commission presented a legislative package for the modernisation of the EU copyright rules, including a new directive on copyright in the digital single market on 14 September 2016. Stakeholders and academics have been strongly divided on the proposal. In February 2019, after more than two years of protracted negotiations, the co-legislators agreed on a new set of copyright rules including two controversial provisions: 1) the creation of a new right that will allow press publishers to ...

The European Commission presented a legislative package for the modernisation of the EU copyright rules, including a new directive on copyright in the digital single market on 14 September 2016. Stakeholders and academics have been strongly divided on the proposal. In February 2019, after more than two years of protracted negotiations, the co-legislators agreed on a new set of copyright rules including two controversial provisions: 1) the creation of a new right that will allow press publishers to claim remuneration for the online use of their publications (Article 11), and 2) the imposition of content monitoring measures on online platforms such as YouTube, which seeks to resolve the 'value gap' and help rights-holders to better monetise and control the distribution of their content online (Article 13). Furthermore, in addition to the mandatory exception for text and data mining for research purposes proposed by the Commission in its proposal, the co-legislators agreed to enshrine in EU law another mandatory exception for general text and data mining (Article 3a) in order to contribute to the development of data analytics and artificial intelligence. In February 2019, Coreper endorsed the compromise text on behalf of the Member States, and the Legal Affairs Committee (JURI) approved it. The political agreement must now be voted in plenary by the European Parliament and formally adopted by the Council to finalise the legislative procedure. Fourth edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Free flow of non-personal data in the European Union

26-09-2018

One of the 16 key elements of the Commission’s digital single market strategy, presented in 2015, was a legislative proposal to facilitate the free flow of non-personal data. Although this proposal was not made during 2016, whilst the Commission gathered more supporting evidence, the mid-term review of the digital single market in 2017 identified the data economy as one of the top three priority areas for action in the second half of the strategy’s implementation. The European data economy could ...

One of the 16 key elements of the Commission’s digital single market strategy, presented in 2015, was a legislative proposal to facilitate the free flow of non-personal data. Although this proposal was not made during 2016, whilst the Commission gathered more supporting evidence, the mid-term review of the digital single market in 2017 identified the data economy as one of the top three priority areas for action in the second half of the strategy’s implementation. The European data economy could grow 18-fold, with favourable policy and legislative conditions in place, representing 4 % of EU GDP by 2020. On 13 September 2017, the Commission tabled a proposal for a regulation aimed at removing obstacles to the free movement of non-personal data across borders. It focuses on removing the geographical restrictions on data storage in the internal market, a move long demanded by stakeholders. In addition, the Commission proposes self-regulation to facilitate switching cloud-service-providers for professional users. Other, less widely agreed aspects, such as access rights and liability are left for future proposals. Within the European Parliament the IMCO committee adopted its report on 4 June along with a mandate to enter into interinstitutional negotiations with the Council. On 19 June a political agreement was reached in trilogue. Parliament is due to vote on this text, in plenary in October 2018. Third edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

The Exception for Text and Data Mining (TDM) in the Proposed Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market - Legal Aspects

15-02-2018

This in-depth analysis, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the Committee on Legal Affairs (JURI-Committee), is a contribution to the workshop on "Text and data mining" held on 22 February 2018 in Brussels. It provides an analysis of the Commission’s Proposal (which introduces in Article 3 a mandatory exception to copyright allowing to carry out text and data mining of protected works), assesses its positive ...

This in-depth analysis, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the Committee on Legal Affairs (JURI-Committee), is a contribution to the workshop on "Text and data mining" held on 22 February 2018 in Brussels. It provides an analysis of the Commission’s Proposal (which introduces in Article 3 a mandatory exception to copyright allowing to carry out text and data mining of protected works), assesses its positive and negative impacts and provides some suggestions for possible improvements. Advantages of introducing an “open clause” on top of an enumerated list of exceptions to address some of the related problems are also reviewed.

Auteur externe

Christophe GEIGER, Giancarlo FROSIO and Oleksandr BULAYENKO

Free flow of non-personal data in the European Union

13-02-2018

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying the above Commission proposal (the proposal), submitted on 13 September 2017 and referred to Parliament's Committee on Internal Market and Consumer Protection (IMCO). The creation of a connected digital single market is one of the ten priorities identified by Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker in his political guidelines for the Commission at the start ...

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying the above Commission proposal (the proposal), submitted on 13 September 2017 and referred to Parliament's Committee on Internal Market and Consumer Protection (IMCO). The creation of a connected digital single market is one of the ten priorities identified by Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker in his political guidelines for the Commission at the start of his mandate. In its digital single market strategy (DSM), the Commission stated that 'Any unnecessary restrictions regarding the location of data within the EU should both be removed and prevented' and committed to proposing an initiative to tackle restrictions on the free movement of data and unjustified restrictions on the location of data for storage or processing purposes. The challenges to the data economy are also specifically discussed in the 2017 communication on building a European data economy, which recognises that 'unjustified restrictions on the free movement of data are likely to constrain the development of the EU data economy [and] impair the freedom to provide services and the freedom of establishment stipulated in the Treaty'. The aim of the proposal is to remove geographical restrictions on the storage of non-personal data in the internal market and to facilitate switching between cloud service providers and the porting of data. It is meant to complement the 2016 General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) which provides a single set of rules for the protection of personal data and provides the basis for the free flow of such data. Thus, for the purposes of the proposal, data is defined as 'data other than personal data as referred to in' the GDPR. The Commission seeks to build upon the existing applicable legal framework that regulates the internal market for data services (E commerce Directive, Services Directive, Transparency Directive), and pursues a high level of cybersecurity in the EU (NIS Directive), while at the same time remaining consistent with the existing provisions.

Geo-Blocking

06-02-2018

This leaflet provides abstracts of selection of latest publications prepared by the European Parliament’s Policy Department on Economic and Scientific Policy at the request of the IMCO Committee in relation to the geo-blocking phenomenon.

This leaflet provides abstracts of selection of latest publications prepared by the European Parliament’s Policy Department on Economic and Scientific Policy at the request of the IMCO Committee in relation to the geo-blocking phenomenon.

Prospects for e-democracy in Europe

02-02-2018

Digital tools could create stronger connections between European citizens and the EU decision-making process and, by doing so, might contribute to reducing the EU democratic deficit. This report investigates what lessons can be drawn from local, national and European experiences of the use of digital tools for the functioning of EU decision-making procedures and institutions. For that purpose, a review of current literature on e-democracy and the European public sphere has been carried out; 22 local ...

Digital tools could create stronger connections between European citizens and the EU decision-making process and, by doing so, might contribute to reducing the EU democratic deficit. This report investigates what lessons can be drawn from local, national and European experiences of the use of digital tools for the functioning of EU decision-making procedures and institutions. For that purpose, a review of current literature on e-democracy and the European public sphere has been carried out; 22 local, national and EU experiences with existing digital tools have been investigated and evaluated; and an analysis has been made of the suitability of the most promising digital tools for implementation and use at EU level. The most important factors for successful e-participation identified in the report are: a close and clear link between e-participation processes and a concrete formal decision-making process; the participatory process and the contribution of its outputs to the overall decision-making process have to be clear to participants from the start; feedback to the participants about what has been done with their contributions is an indispensable feature of the process; a participative process should not be limited to one event but should be imbedded in an institutional 'culture of participation'; e-participation must be accompanied by an effective mobilisation and engagement strategy, involving communication instruments tailored for different target groups.

Retrofitting smart tachographs by 2020: Costs and benefits

02-02-2018

The scope of this study is to assess the costs and benefits of retrofitting smart tachographs in heavy-duty vehicles operating in international transport by January 2020. Specifically, it addresses economic consequences of a technological upgrade of these vehicles. Moreover, it considers the related economic impacts incurred on national enforcement authorities. It also assesses the costs, which Member States’ national enforcement bodies risk to incur, among others, due to retrieving and processing ...

The scope of this study is to assess the costs and benefits of retrofitting smart tachographs in heavy-duty vehicles operating in international transport by January 2020. Specifically, it addresses economic consequences of a technological upgrade of these vehicles. Moreover, it considers the related economic impacts incurred on national enforcement authorities. It also assesses the costs, which Member States’ national enforcement bodies risk to incur, among others, due to retrieving and processing data from smart tachometers. In assessing both the costs and benefits, the study focuses on the EU-level analysis with consideration of the European Added Value aspect in particular.

Auteur externe

This study has been written by Dr Michał Suchanek of the University of Gdańsk, at the request of the European Added Value Unit of the Directorate for Impact Assessment and European Added Value, within the Directorate General for Parliamentary Research Services (DG EPRS) of the General Secretariat of the European Parliament. The preface has been written by Aleksandra Heflich, European Added Value Unit.

Des communications à des prix abordables pour les entreprises et les consommateurs

01-02-2018

La notion de TIC englobe un large éventail de technologies, allant des technologies de l’information aux fonctions de contrôle et de surveillance basées sur des réseaux, en passant par les télécommunications, les médias de diffusion et tous les types de traitement et de transmission audio et vidéo. Les technologies de l’information et de la communication (TIC), les données numérisées et les services d’accès à l’internet ont pris la place des services traditionnels de téléphone, en tant que produits-phares ...

La notion de TIC englobe un large éventail de technologies, allant des technologies de l’information aux fonctions de contrôle et de surveillance basées sur des réseaux, en passant par les télécommunications, les médias de diffusion et tous les types de traitement et de transmission audio et vidéo. Les technologies de l’information et de la communication (TIC), les données numérisées et les services d’accès à l’internet ont pris la place des services traditionnels de téléphone, en tant que produits-phares tant pour les consommateurs que pour les entreprises. Si la diffusion linéaire demeure le principal vecteur de propagation de l’information et la principale source de divertissement en Europe, de plus en plus de contenus audiovisuels sont disponibles sur demande et la connectivité internet 4G ou 5G connaît une croissance exponentielle. En conséquence, l’UE a mis en place un cadre réglementaire pour les télécommunications, qui embrasse les télécoms, fixes ou mobiles, l’internet, les services de transmission et de diffusion, avec un ensemble de règles qui s’applique dans tous les États membres de l’UE.

Une stratégie numérique pour l’Europe

01-02-2018

Depuis 1995, les technologies de l’information et de la communication (TIC) ont stimulé la productivité et la croissance dans l’Union européenne[1]. Le concept de TIC recouvre un large éventail de technologies, allant des technologies de l’information aux fonctions de contrôle et de surveillance basées sur des réseaux, en passant par les télécommunications, les médias de diffusion et tous les types de traitement et de transmission audio et vidéo. Depuis une trentaine d’années, la «convergence technologique ...

Depuis 1995, les technologies de l’information et de la communication (TIC) ont stimulé la productivité et la croissance dans l’Union européenne[1]. Le concept de TIC recouvre un large éventail de technologies, allant des technologies de l’information aux fonctions de contrôle et de surveillance basées sur des réseaux, en passant par les télécommunications, les médias de diffusion et tous les types de traitement et de transmission audio et vidéo. Depuis une trentaine d’années, la «convergence technologique» estompe les frontières entre les télécommunications, la radiodiffusion et les technologies de l’information. Si la diffusion linéaire demeure le principal vecteur de diffusion de l’information et la principale source de divertissement en Europe, de plus en plus de contenus audiovisuels sont disponibles à la demande et la croissance exponentielle de la connectivité internet 4G ou 5G ainsi que de l’«internet des objets» (voitures connectées, dispositifs portables et capteurs, notamment) ne font que renforcer l’omniprésence de l’internet. Pour répondre aux différents enjeux, la Commission a instauré le marché unique numérique en 2015 afin de donner suite aux principales propositions législatives définies comme prioritaires, telles que la dynamisation du commerce électronique, le droit d’auteur, l’audiovisuel, le réexamen du cadre réglementaire des télécommunications, la vie privée et les communications électroniques, l’harmonisation des droits numériques, la livraison de colis à des prix abordables, l’harmonisation de la réglementation en matière de TVA et la cybersécurité.

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