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Review of European and National Election Results. Second update

26-02-2016

This document provides a second update of the Review of European and National Elections, published in November 2014 by the Public Opinion Monitoring Unit of DG Communication.  The Review was dedicated to the results of the European elections of May 2014 and to the history of 35 years of direct elections to the European Parliament since 1979, as well as to the different national elections. This latest edition addresses the changes in the European Parliament since the first update, published in July ...

This document provides a second update of the Review of European and National Elections, published in November 2014 by the Public Opinion Monitoring Unit of DG Communication.  The Review was dedicated to the results of the European elections of May 2014 and to the history of 35 years of direct elections to the European Parliament since 1979, as well as to the different national elections. This latest edition addresses the changes in the European Parliament since the first update, published in July 2015. The reader will also find the results of the elections held in Member States since July 2015: five legislative elections (EL, ES, HR, PL, and PT) and one direct presidential election (PT).

Argentina: A Change of Course

25-11-2015

On 22 November 2015, Mauricio Macri, candidate of a coalition named 'Let's change' (Cambiemos), was elected president of Argentina. He will assume office on 10 December. Macri received 51.4 % of the vote in the second round of the presidential elections. His election ends 12 years of Peronist governments. Macri's victory owes much to the high number of votes he received in urban centres, particularly in the capital Buenos Aires and the second largest city, Córdoba. Despite Macri's final victory in ...

On 22 November 2015, Mauricio Macri, candidate of a coalition named 'Let's change' (Cambiemos), was elected president of Argentina. He will assume office on 10 December. Macri received 51.4 % of the vote in the second round of the presidential elections. His election ends 12 years of Peronist governments. Macri's victory owes much to the high number of votes he received in urban centres, particularly in the capital Buenos Aires and the second largest city, Córdoba. Despite Macri's final victory in the presidential elections, the 25 October parliamentary and provincial polls showed that the Peronist movement remains the principal political force. After the 25 October Congress elections, the Front for Victory (Frente para la Victoria, FpV), currently in government, remains the largest bloc in the new Congress, although it lost its absolute majority in the Chamber of Deputies. Macri faces the challenge of mobilising support in Congress for the new government's legislative proposals. The most likely scenario is that he will try to establish a coalition with the Peronist factions opposed to President Cristina Fernández and the FpV. The new government is likely to take measures to liberalise and open up the economy. The new government will seek strengthened links with the USA and the EU, and may well push for trade liberalisation in Mercosur. Macri has announced that he will ask for Mercosur's 'democratic clause' to be invoked against Venezuela. Macri has stressed the need to advance towards a Mercosur-EU free trade agreement. Overall, the change of government appears an opportunity for renewed relations between the EU and Argentina.

2014 European Elections: Profile of voters and non-voters

02-06-2015

A few months after the 2014 European elections, the time has come to examine in depth the reasons for participation and abstention in the contest. The Directorate-General for Communication in the European Parliament has commissioned desk research to analyse the electoral behaviour of voters and non-voters, in order to better understand the reasons underlying their decision either to vote or abstain, and to analyse their attitudes and opinions regarding the EU. This document is based on a post-election ...

A few months after the 2014 European elections, the time has come to examine in depth the reasons for participation and abstention in the contest. The Directorate-General for Communication in the European Parliament has commissioned desk research to analyse the electoral behaviour of voters and non-voters, in order to better understand the reasons underlying their decision either to vote or abstain, and to analyse their attitudes and opinions regarding the EU. This document is based on a post-election survey of more than 27,000 Europeans over the age of 18 (16 in Austria), carried out by TNS Opinion a few days after the vote, between 30 May and 27 June 2014.  It is divided in three parts: the desk research on voters and non-voters, and two series of factsheets per EU Member State, one dedicated to voters and another to non-voters. For Belgium, Luxembourg (compulsory vote for both countries) and Malta (high level of turnout), a factsheet on non-voters is not provided, given the low number of non-voters. ***This document is available in all EU official languages in the Eurobarometer page of Europarl.

A Decisive Victory in Chile's Presidential Election May Prove Insufficient for Reform

18-12-2013

As expected, Michelle Bachelet, the candidate of the Socialist Party (Partido Socialista, PS) and the centre-left coalition New Majority (Nueva Mayoría, NM), obtained a clear victory in Chile's presidential elections. Bachelet's resounding victory underscored voters' disapproval of the current centre-right government. However, Bachelet did not - as expected - win in the first round of the elections. A high abstention rate means that she received a relatively low number of votes. The high number of ...

As expected, Michelle Bachelet, the candidate of the Socialist Party (Partido Socialista, PS) and the centre-left coalition New Majority (Nueva Mayoría, NM), obtained a clear victory in Chile's presidential elections. Bachelet's resounding victory underscored voters' disapproval of the current centre-right government. However, Bachelet did not - as expected - win in the first round of the elections. A high abstention rate means that she received a relatively low number of votes. The high number of candidates points to the loss of legitimacy of the two political alliances which have dominated Chilean politics for more than two decades. The five parties in the NM will have a solid majority in the Congress. In the Chamber of Deputies, they won the largest majority for a governing alliance since 1997, partly thanks to the inclusion of the Communist Party of Chile (Partido Comunista de Chile, PC). The two blocs' share of the vote and their seats in Congress has been remarkably stable since 1989, largely because Chile's bi-nominal electoral system favours two major coalitions. The elections took place against a background of social unrest - particularly the students' protests - and a general quest for renewal in Chilean society. The NM, advocating comprehensive social and political reforms, turned to the left. Michelle Bachelet and the NM announced a programme with three foci: educational reform, tax reform , and the adoption of a new constitution. However, Bachelet's government will not have a sufficient majority in Congress to adopt the necessary legislation unless the centreright opposition agrees. If only limited reform is possible, unfulfilled expectations could be a major challenge in the coming years. Decelerating economic growth could be another challenge, particularly if combined with lowered international prices on copper, Chile's main export commodity. Agreement on the upgrade of the EU-Chile Association Agreement form 2002 may be reached in the coming years.

Independent Candidates in National and European Elections

15-04-2013

Independent candidates remain marginal vote-getters in the vast majority of elections in which they compete. However, they do regularly win seats in legislative assemblies in a number of European countries, and occasionally achieve surprise victories in others. Half of the EU member states currently grant ballot access to independents in national legislative elections, while only a quarter of member states allow non-party candidates in European Parliament elections. Ballot access requirements for ...

Independent candidates remain marginal vote-getters in the vast majority of elections in which they compete. However, they do regularly win seats in legislative assemblies in a number of European countries, and occasionally achieve surprise victories in others. Half of the EU member states currently grant ballot access to independents in national legislative elections, while only a quarter of member states allow non-party candidates in European Parliament elections. Ballot access requirements for independents vary widely across EU-27 but tend to be more stringent for European elections than for national elections. Independent candidates perform better in systems with plurality rule or preferential voting compared to party-list PR systems. They win seats in single-member districts and low-magnitude multi-member districts. Although independents are expected to benefit from electoral rules that make politics more candidate-centered, the performance of non-party candidates does not depend on the modality of lists (open or closed). The vote for independents has elements of a protest vote. Voters who vote for independent candidates tend to be more critical of the government and less satisfied with the way democracy works in their country than party-voters. They are also less likely to feel close to any political party. When independent candidates are elected to office, they frequently join parties and parliamentary party groups. Thus, independence is often not a principled position but a temporary status resulting from circumstantial choices made by individuals competing for political office.

Údar seachtarach

Piret Ehin, Ülle Madise, Mihkel Solvak, Rein Taagepera, Kristjan Vassil and Priit Vinkel

Imeachtaí atá ar na bacáin

22-01-2020
Understanding EU policy on data protection: State-of-play and future challenges
Imeacht eile -
EPRS

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