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Sources of EU funding for tourism-related activities

05-07-2017

There is no specific EU fund dedicated to tourism as such. However, although not strictly focused on tourism, a number of EU funds may help to boost its prospects and address its challenges. Depending on the priorities of each EU funding programme, various legal entities (such as public bodies, companies, SMEs, research organisations, universities, non-governmental organisations and tourism cluster initiatives) may benefit from EU funding in order to run activities that may have a positive impact ...

There is no specific EU fund dedicated to tourism as such. However, although not strictly focused on tourism, a number of EU funds may help to boost its prospects and address its challenges. Depending on the priorities of each EU funding programme, various legal entities (such as public bodies, companies, SMEs, research organisations, universities, non-governmental organisations and tourism cluster initiatives) may benefit from EU funding in order to run activities that may have a positive impact on tourism.

Research for TRAN Committee - Health tourism in the EU: a general investigation

15-06-2017

This study defines and explores health tourism and its three main components: medical, wellness, and spa tourism. Health tourism comprises around 5% of general tourism in the EU28 and contributes approximately 0.3% to the EU economy. Health tourism has a much higher domestic share than general tourism does. Increasing the share of health tourism may reduce tourism seasonality, improve sustainability and labour quality, and may help to reduce health costs through prevention measures and decreased ...

This study defines and explores health tourism and its three main components: medical, wellness, and spa tourism. Health tourism comprises around 5% of general tourism in the EU28 and contributes approximately 0.3% to the EU economy. Health tourism has a much higher domestic share than general tourism does. Increasing the share of health tourism may reduce tourism seasonality, improve sustainability and labour quality, and may help to reduce health costs through prevention measures and decreased pharmaceutical consumption.

Údar seachtarach

Tomas Mainil, Eke Eijgelaar, Jeroen Klijs, Jeroen Nawijn, Paul Peeters

Turasóireacht

01-06-2017

Ó mhí na Nollag 2009, tá a bhunús dlí féin ag an mbeartas turasóireachta. Níl a bhuiséad féin aige fós, áfach, bíodh sé sin faoin gcreat airgeadais ilbhliantúil (CAI) reatha do 2014-2020 nó sa togra is déanaí do CAI 2021-2027.

Ó mhí na Nollag 2009, tá a bhunús dlí féin ag an mbeartas turasóireachta. Níl a bhuiséad féin aige fós, áfach, bíodh sé sin faoin gcreat airgeadais ilbhliantúil (CAI) reatha do 2014-2020 nó sa togra is déanaí do CAI 2021-2027.

Research for TRAN Committee - From Responsible Best Practices to Sustainable Tourism Development

15-03-2016

This report explores sustainable development in EU tourism and concludes that there is a lack of up-to-date data for both the environmental and social effects of tourism. Furthermore, most sustainable tourism initiatives depend on public funding highlighting the failure of industry to internalise sustainable development costs. Tourism, environmental and transport policies in the EU need to integrate better to create sustainable development. The report concludes with general recommendations for sustainable ...

This report explores sustainable development in EU tourism and concludes that there is a lack of up-to-date data for both the environmental and social effects of tourism. Furthermore, most sustainable tourism initiatives depend on public funding highlighting the failure of industry to internalise sustainable development costs. Tourism, environmental and transport policies in the EU need to integrate better to create sustainable development. The report concludes with general recommendations for sustainable development, improving impact evaluations tourism at the EU scale.

Údar seachtarach

Paul Peeters, Ghislain Dubois, Wolfgang Strasdas, Marie Lootvoet, Runa Zeppenfeld and Eke Eijgelaar (University of Central Lancashire, United Kingdom)

EU Strategy for the Adriatic and Ionian region (EUSAIR)

23-10-2015

The EU Strategy for the Adriatic and Ionian Region (EUSAIR) is the third EU macro-regional strategy, following the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region (2009) and the EU Strategy for the Danube Region (2011). On a mandate from the European Council, the EUSAIR was developed jointly by the Commission with the Adriatic-Ionian region countries and stakeholders. The EUSAIR launch conference took place in Brussels on 18 November 2014. The Adriatic and Ionian region faces a number of challenges, such as ...

The EU Strategy for the Adriatic and Ionian Region (EUSAIR) is the third EU macro-regional strategy, following the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region (2009) and the EU Strategy for the Danube Region (2011). On a mandate from the European Council, the EUSAIR was developed jointly by the Commission with the Adriatic-Ionian region countries and stakeholders. The EUSAIR launch conference took place in Brussels on 18 November 2014. The Adriatic and Ionian region faces a number of challenges, such as environmental degradation, inefficient transport connections and a lack of strong trans-border cooperation. The EUSAIR aims to tackle these challenges by promoting economic growth and prosperity in the Adriatic-Ionian region through improving its attractiveness, competitiveness and connectivity. It also aims to protect sea, coastal and inland environments and ecosystems. In addition, as the EUSAIR also includes non-EU countries, it should play an important role in promoting the Western Balkans' EU integration. The aims of the strategy will be pursued through four main pillars: 'blue growth', connecting the region, environmental quality and sustainable tourism. Each participating country will be in charge of coordinating and monitoring the implementation of the strategy. As with all EU macro-regional strategies, the EUSAIR does not rely on new funds but rather exploits existing financial instruments, such as the European Structural and Investment Funds (ESIF), as well as the Instrument for Pre-accession Assistance (IPA) for non-EU countries. Participating countries are also encouraged to seek alternative sources of finance, including private funds.

Research for TRAN Committee - Tourism and the Sharing Economy: Challenges and Opportunities for the EU

15-10-2015

The impacts, challenges and opportunities caused by the fast-growing sharing economy in tourism are assessed. The report describes the definition, size, and development of the sharing (or collaborative) economy, assessing the (dis-)advantages for the tourism sector, concluding with policy analysis and recommendations. Large parts of the sharing economy are affecting the tourism sector, although its share is very small. The main challenges are taxation and regulation; main opportunities are the innovative ...

The impacts, challenges and opportunities caused by the fast-growing sharing economy in tourism are assessed. The report describes the definition, size, and development of the sharing (or collaborative) economy, assessing the (dis-)advantages for the tourism sector, concluding with policy analysis and recommendations. Large parts of the sharing economy are affecting the tourism sector, although its share is very small. The main challenges are taxation and regulation; main opportunities are the innovative power and enhanced competition.

Údar seachtarach

Paul Peeters, Corné Dijkmans, Ondrej Mitas, Boukje Strous and Jeroen Vinkensteijn

The sharing economy and tourism: Tourist accommodation

25-09-2015

Tourism services have traditionally been provided by businesses such as hotels, taxis or tour operators. Recently, a growing number of individuals are proposing to share temporarily with tourists what they own (for example their house or car) or what they do (for example meals or excursions). This type of sharing is referred to as the 'sharing economy'. It is not limited to tourism and can be found in many areas of social and economic activity, although tourism has been one of the sectors most impacted ...

Tourism services have traditionally been provided by businesses such as hotels, taxis or tour operators. Recently, a growing number of individuals are proposing to share temporarily with tourists what they own (for example their house or car) or what they do (for example meals or excursions). This type of sharing is referred to as the 'sharing economy'. It is not limited to tourism and can be found in many areas of social and economic activity, although tourism has been one of the sectors most impacted. Sharing goods and services between individuals is nothing new in itself. However, the development of the internet and, as a consequence, the creation of online platforms has made sharing easier than ever. In the past decade, many companies managing such platforms have emerged on the market. A well-known example of a platform is one on which people can book accommodation (Airbnb). The sharing economy has had a positive impact on tourism as well as a negative one. Its advocates think that it provides easy access to a wide range of services that are often of higher quality and more affordable than those provided by traditional business counterparts. Critics, on the other hand, claim that the sharing economy provides unfair competition, reduces job security, avoids taxes and poses a threat to safety, health and disability compliance standards. The response to the sharing economy remains fragmented in the EU. Some activities have been regulated at local level. Neither the European Commission nor the Parliament have taken an official position so far, though a recent report from the Transport and Tourism Committee touches upon the issue. The Commission has announced that it plans to assess the role of platforms in order to see if any changes or new legislation is needed.

Tourism and the European Union: Recent trends and policy developments

25-09-2015

Tourism is the third largest socio-economic activity in the European Union, making an important contribution to the EU economy and to job creation. Europe is the most visited region in the world. However, tourism in other regions is growing faster and Europe's market share, in terms of international tourist arrivals and receipts, is shrinking. Tourism businesses in the EU are confronted with a number of changes in tourist profile and behaviour, for example in terms of age, country of origin, how ...

Tourism is the third largest socio-economic activity in the European Union, making an important contribution to the EU economy and to job creation. Europe is the most visited region in the world. However, tourism in other regions is growing faster and Europe's market share, in terms of international tourist arrivals and receipts, is shrinking. Tourism businesses in the EU are confronted with a number of changes in tourist profile and behaviour, for example in terms of age, country of origin, how they plan and buy their travel, or which mode of transport they use. Tourism policy remains a competence of the Member States. As the Treaties allow the EU only to support, coordinate or supplement the actions of the Member States, EU tourism policy has been rather limited, consisting mainly in providing financial support or legislating through other EU policies. The current framework for tourism policy is based upon a 2010 Communication; a revised strategy is expected to be adopted by the European Commission later in 2015.

Cycling mobility in the EU

20-05-2015

As an everyday activity for millions of Europeans, cycling is increasing in importance in European society. In economic and social terms, it influences or impacts upon transport, mobility, environment and climate change, the economy and tourism. Currently, no cycling strategy exists at EU level. Cycling policies are a matter for Member States, which provide the regulatory frameworks and – in many cases – country-wide cycling programmes, while concrete actions are generated mostly at local or regional ...

As an everyday activity for millions of Europeans, cycling is increasing in importance in European society. In economic and social terms, it influences or impacts upon transport, mobility, environment and climate change, the economy and tourism. Currently, no cycling strategy exists at EU level. Cycling policies are a matter for Member States, which provide the regulatory frameworks and – in many cases – country-wide cycling programmes, while concrete actions are generated mostly at local or regional levels, notably in cities. Nevertheless, the EU has taken an active role in cycling promotion, trying to make the best use of this mode of transport, including in efforts to achieve Europe 2020 strategy targets. Accordingly, a number of EU policies and programmes take cycling into account. The EU's overall approach aims to bring about a lasting change in people's behaviour, in favour of more cycling. To attain this goal, several different aspects of cycling promotion could benefit from coordinated development. EU support consists principally of guidance, exchange of best practice, and financial support, oriented towards local and regional authorities promoting a stronger culture of cycling mobility. More and more people use cycling for their everyday travel. As a means of transport over short distances, cycling brings certain economic, environmental and health-related benefits. In parallel, cycling for leisure and tourism is also evolving, thanks to a growing network of cycle paths. One of the most visible cycling developments is taking place in cities, where recent trends such as the introduction of bicycle sharing systems, electric bicycles and cargo bikes, are transforming the cityscape and contributing to a broader acceptance of cycling in society. For its part, the European Parliament contributes to cycling promotion with continuous active support. Stakeholders are already looking ahead and aiming for a coordinated EU approach to cycling.

Mapping the Cost of Non-Europe, 2014 -19 - Third edition (April 2015)

13-04-2015

This study brings together work in progress on a long-term project to identify and analyse the 'cost of non-Europe' in a number of policy fields. This concept, first pioneered by the European Parliament in the 1980s, is used here to quantify the potential efficiency gains in today's European economy from pursuing a series of policy initiatives recently advocated by Parliament - from a wider and deeper digital single market to better coordinated national and European policies for defence and development ...

This study brings together work in progress on a long-term project to identify and analyse the 'cost of non-Europe' in a number of policy fields. This concept, first pioneered by the European Parliament in the 1980s, is used here to quantify the potential efficiency gains in today's European economy from pursuing a series of policy initiatives recently advocated by Parliament - from a wider and deeper digital single market to better coordinated national and European policies for defence and development. The benefits may be measured principally in additional GDP generated or a more rational use of public resources. The latest analysis suggests that the European economy could be boosted by almost 1.6 trillion euro per year - or 12 per cent of EU-28  GDP (2014) - by such measures over time. The study is intended as a contribution to the on-going discussion about the European Union’s policy priorities over the current five-year institutional cycle, from 2014 to 2019.  

Imeachtaí atá ar na bacáin

20-11-2019
Europe's Future: Where next for EU institutional Reform?
Imeacht eile -
EPRS
21-11-2019
Looking back on 1989: The Fight for Freedom
Imeacht eile -
EPRS

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