In Ecuador, a Decisive Victory for President Rafael Correa Consolidates the 'Citizen's Revolution'

26-02-2013

Ecuador's President Rafael Correa was re-elected for a third term with 56.9 % of the vote. His closest opponent, Guillermo Lasso, lagged far behind, with 22.8 %. Correa's support can be attributed to his social policy. In power since 2007, he has weathered the economic crisis well, making use of financial reforms and high oil prices to subsidise public spending. Alianza País (AP), Correa's party, won an absolute majority in the National Assembly. While the overseas vote remains to be counted, the AP is certain to obtain a two-thirds majority in the Assembly, allowing it to reform the constitution. The chief opposition parties are the Movement CREO and the PSC, although they control together only 18 seats (about 13 %). The absolute majority for AP in the parliament will allow the passage of controversial proposals, including laws on communications and water resources. These proposals have provoked considerable resistance in the past. President Correa's re-election is consistent with a trend of electing socially-minded presidents in Latin American countries. Yet Correa has said he will not seek re-election in 2017.

Ecuador's President Rafael Correa was re-elected for a third term with 56.9 % of the vote. His closest opponent, Guillermo Lasso, lagged far behind, with 22.8 %. Correa's support can be attributed to his social policy. In power since 2007, he has weathered the economic crisis well, making use of financial reforms and high oil prices to subsidise public spending. Alianza País (AP), Correa's party, won an absolute majority in the National Assembly. While the overseas vote remains to be counted, the AP is certain to obtain a two-thirds majority in the Assembly, allowing it to reform the constitution. The chief opposition parties are the Movement CREO and the PSC, although they control together only 18 seats (about 13 %). The absolute majority for AP in the parliament will allow the passage of controversial proposals, including laws on communications and water resources. These proposals have provoked considerable resistance in the past. President Correa's re-election is consistent with a trend of electing socially-minded presidents in Latin American countries. Yet Correa has said he will not seek re-election in 2017.