9

rezultat(a)

Riječ(i)
Vrsta publikacije
Područje politike
Autor
Datum

THE HAGUE CONFERENCE ON PRIVATE INTERNATIONAL LAW “JUDGMENTS CONVENTION”

16-04-2018

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee, provides an assessment of the ongoing work of the Hague Conference on the Judgments Convention. The analysis focuses on the November 2017 Draft Convention, its interplay with international and Union instruments in the field, as well as its potential future impact on the regulation of civil and commercial cross-border disputes.

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee, provides an assessment of the ongoing work of the Hague Conference on the Judgments Convention. The analysis focuses on the November 2017 Draft Convention, its interplay with international and Union instruments in the field, as well as its potential future impact on the regulation of civil and commercial cross-border disputes.

Vanjski autor

Pedro A. DE MIGUEL ASENSIO (coord.), Professor, Complutense University of Madrid, Spain Gilles CUNIBERTI, Professor, University of Luxembourg Pietro FRANZINA, Professor, University of Ferrara, Italy Christian HEINZE, Professor, Leibniz University of Hannover, Germany Marta REQUEJO ISIDRO, Senior Research Fellow, Max Planck Institute Luxembourg

A Europe for mobile and international families

30-11-2017

As an EU citizen, you can freely move around the EU with your partner and/or children. The EU has clear rules on which national court has jurisdiction in international divorce and parental responsibility cases. The European Parliament supports amicable solutions through mediation in cross-border family disputes, including parental child abductions.

As an EU citizen, you can freely move around the EU with your partner and/or children. The EU has clear rules on which national court has jurisdiction in international divorce and parental responsibility cases. The European Parliament supports amicable solutions through mediation in cross-border family disputes, including parental child abductions.

Towards an EU common position on the use of armed drones

15-06-2017

Since the European Parliament (EP) passed a resolution on the use of armed drones in February 2014, it has pointed several times to the need for a common EU position on the matter. It has stressed in particular the importance of ensuring compliance with international human rights and humanitarian law when using armed drones. This publication, which was requested by the EP’s Human Rights Subcommittee, includes a briefing with specific recommendations, drawn up from a legal standpoint, on the elements ...

Since the European Parliament (EP) passed a resolution on the use of armed drones in February 2014, it has pointed several times to the need for a common EU position on the matter. It has stressed in particular the importance of ensuring compliance with international human rights and humanitarian law when using armed drones. This publication, which was requested by the EP’s Human Rights Subcommittee, includes a briefing with specific recommendations, drawn up from a legal standpoint, on the elements that a future Council decision on the use of armed drones should include. This publication also includes a report on the workshop held on 22 March 2017, at which a first draft of the briefing was presented and discussed with Members and stakeholders. The discussion at the workshop confirmed that there was broad support in Parliament for the development of common European principles governing the use of armed drones, not least in view of the emergence of new risks from non-state actors and the EU’s commitment to enhancing security and defence cooperation. While there is currently no agreement between Member States to pursue the matter at EU level, the workshop debate drew attention to the common rules on exports of armed drones and drone technology that already exist. Furthermore, progress has been made recently in agreeing a joint EU position regarding the related matter of lethal autonomous weapons.

Vanjski autor

Jessica DORSEY, Giulia BONACQUISTI

Mercury: Aligning EU legislation with Minamata

07-07-2016

The United Nations' Minamata Convention on mercury was agreed in 2013 with a view to protecting human health and the environment from the adverse effects of mercury. Although mercury use has declined significantly in recent decades, mercury released into the air, water and land remains a serious threat to human health and the environment. Once emitted into the air or water, mercury can travel over long distances, which makes it a global problem. Current EU policy bans exports of mercury, provides ...

The United Nations' Minamata Convention on mercury was agreed in 2013 with a view to protecting human health and the environment from the adverse effects of mercury. Although mercury use has declined significantly in recent decades, mercury released into the air, water and land remains a serious threat to human health and the environment. Once emitted into the air or water, mercury can travel over long distances, which makes it a global problem. Current EU policy bans exports of mercury, provides for the storage of mercury waste, restricts the use of mercury in various products and seeks to address pollution caused by it. However, there are some regulatory gaps between EU legislation and the Minamata Convention. The European Commission has recently submitted a legislative proposal aiming to align this legislation with the Convention in view of its ratification. The rapporteur for the European Parliament's Committee for Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI) has presented his draft report on the proposal. The deadline for submission of amendments is 13 July 2016. A more recent edition of this document is available. Find it by searching by the document title at this address: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/thinktank/en/home.html

Article 50 TEU: Withdrawal of a Member State from the EU

18-02-2016

The right of a Member State to withdraw from the European Union was introduced for the first time with the Lisbon Treaty; the possibility of withdrawal was highly controversial before that. Article 50 TEU does not set down any substantive conditions for a Member State to be able to exercise its right to withdraw, rather it includes only procedural requirements. It provides for the negotiation of a withdrawal agreement between the EU and the withdrawing state, defining in particular the latter's future ...

The right of a Member State to withdraw from the European Union was introduced for the first time with the Lisbon Treaty; the possibility of withdrawal was highly controversial before that. Article 50 TEU does not set down any substantive conditions for a Member State to be able to exercise its right to withdraw, rather it includes only procedural requirements. It provides for the negotiation of a withdrawal agreement between the EU and the withdrawing state, defining in particular the latter's future relationship with the Union. If no agreement is concluded within two years, that state's membership ends automatically, unless the European Council and the Member State concerned decide jointly to extend this period. The legal consequence of a withdrawal from the EU is the end of the application of the EU Treaties (and the Protocols thereto) in the state concerned from that point on. EU law ceases to apply in the withdrawing state, although any national acts adopted in implementation or transposition of EU law would remain valid until the national authorities decide to amend or repeal them. A withdrawal agreement would need to address the phasing-out of EU financial programmes and other EU norms. Experts agree that in order to replace EU law, specifically in any field of exclusive EU competence, the withdrawing state would need to enact substantial new legislation and that, in any case, complete isolation of the withdrawing state from the effects of the EU acquis would be impossible if there is to be a future relationship between former Member State and the EU. Furthermore, a withdrawal agreement could contain provisions on the transitional application of EU rules, in particular with regard to rights deriving from EU citizenship and to other rights deriving from EU law, which would otherwise extinguish with the withdrawal.

EU Implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD): European Implementation Assessment

05-02-2016

This in-depth analysis, produced by the Ex-Post Impact Assessment Unit of the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS), looks into the state of play of the implementation by the European Union of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UN CRPD), after the first round of the review process. The Convention's overarching principles entail mainstreaming of disability rights across all policies and within all institutions. This paper analyses the institutional arrangements ...

This in-depth analysis, produced by the Ex-Post Impact Assessment Unit of the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS), looks into the state of play of the implementation by the European Union of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UN CRPD), after the first round of the review process. The Convention's overarching principles entail mainstreaming of disability rights across all policies and within all institutions. This paper analyses the institutional arrangements required to monitor the implementation process, and subsequently puts the recommendations of the CRPD Committee ('Concluding Observations') into a broader context, outlining the progress made so far and the challenges ahead.

The European Social Charter in the Context of Implementation of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights

12-01-2016

This study was commissioned by the European Parliament's Policy Department for Citizens' Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the AFCO Committee. Despite its increased visibility and relevance to fields covered by the EU, the European Social Charter has been largely ignored from the more recent developments concerning the protection of fundamental rights in the EU legal order. This creates the risk of conflicting obligations imposed on the EU Member States, respectively as members ...

This study was commissioned by the European Parliament's Policy Department for Citizens' Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the AFCO Committee. Despite its increased visibility and relevance to fields covered by the EU, the European Social Charter has been largely ignored from the more recent developments concerning the protection of fundamental rights in the EU legal order. This creates the risk of conflicting obligations imposed on the EU Member States, respectively as members of the EU and as States parties to the European Social Charter. Various options could be explored to move beyond the current impasse.

Vanjski autor

Olivier DE SCHUTTER (University of Louvain - UCL, Belgium)

Refugee status under international law

26-10-2015

Over the past few years, the number of migrants requesting international protection has increased exponentially. The Geneva Convention on refugees and its subsequent Protocol entitle refugees to international protection, most importantly to the right not to be returned to their home countries. However, they define refugees in a restrictive manner, thus excluding many other categories of international migrants from the rights provided therein.

Over the past few years, the number of migrants requesting international protection has increased exponentially. The Geneva Convention on refugees and its subsequent Protocol entitle refugees to international protection, most importantly to the right not to be returned to their home countries. However, they define refugees in a restrictive manner, thus excluding many other categories of international migrants from the rights provided therein.

Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) Provisions in the EU's International Investment Agreements (Volume 1: Workshop ; Volume 2: Studies - in the Annex)

04-09-2014

The European Parliament organised a workshop on 1 April 2014 on Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) provisions in the EU's international investment agreements. Volume 1 of this publication describes the proceedings of this workshop, while Volume 2 contains three studies: one on Investment protection agreements as instruments of international economic law, one on ISDS and alternatives of dispute resolution in international investment law, and another on International investment protection agreements ...

The European Parliament organised a workshop on 1 April 2014 on Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) provisions in the EU's international investment agreements. Volume 1 of this publication describes the proceedings of this workshop, while Volume 2 contains three studies: one on Investment protection agreements as instruments of international economic law, one on ISDS and alternatives of dispute resolution in international investment law, and another on International investment protection agreements and EU law.

Vanjski autor

Pieter Jan Kuijper, Ingolf Pernice and Steffen Hindelang

Partneri

Ostanite povezani

email update imageSustav primanja novosti elektroničkom poštom

Zahvaljujući sustavu slanja obavijesti e-poštom koji izravno šalje najnovije informacije na vašu adresu elektroničke pošte možete pratiti novosti o svim osobama i događajima u vezi s Parlamentom. To uključuje novosti u vezi sa zastupnicima, usluge informiranja ili rubriku Think Tank.

Sustav je dostupan na bilo kojoj stranici internetskog portala Parlamenta. Kako biste se predbilježili i počeli dobivati obavijesti iz rubrike Think Tank, dovoljno je upisati svoju adresu e-pošte, odabrati temu koja vas zanima, naznačiti učestalost kojom ih želite dobivati (svakodnevno, tjedno ili mjesečno) i potvrditi registraciju pritiskom na poveznicu koju ćete dobiti na adresu e-pošte.

RSS imageIzvori vijesti

Ne propustite informacije ili novosti s internetskog portala Europskog parlamenta zahvaljujući RSS prijenosu.

Odaberite dolje naznačenu poveznicu kako biste konfigurirali RSS prijenos.