Trends in Biometrics

28-09-2006

Ad hocism, finance and industry drive trends in policies and emerging choices. The EU 25 diverge over the choice of biometrics, ID cards and passports, inter-operability, format, document durability, technical scope of the attendant technology (including document readers, staff training), quality codes of practice, ability and interest in measures to combat malevolent insider action. There are discrepancies between government rhetoric and practice. There are claims that data protection is primary but inadequate attention seems to be paid to combating opportunities for fraud, including out-sourcing to private sector concerns inside the state or to third states .Out-sourcing poses a serious threat. Proper risk assessment and the introduction of appropriate, strong democratic controls are essential to the success of the Hague. The claims of biometrics are poorly communicated, soft law abounds with weak controls and inadequate levels of knowledge about the respective technologies and the possibilities opened by them. National parliaments with a strong EP must ensure accountability and legitimacy. There is an urgent need for a framework directive on data protection for law enforcement purposes before realising the principle of availability and widespread inter-operability, and to set out an EU model on biometricised egovernance.

Ad hocism, finance and industry drive trends in policies and emerging choices. The EU 25 diverge over the choice of biometrics, ID cards and passports, inter-operability, format, document durability, technical scope of the attendant technology (including document readers, staff training), quality codes of practice, ability and interest in measures to combat malevolent insider action. There are discrepancies between government rhetoric and practice. There are claims that data protection is primary but inadequate attention seems to be paid to combating opportunities for fraud, including out-sourcing to private sector concerns inside the state or to third states .Out-sourcing poses a serious threat. Proper risk assessment and the introduction of appropriate, strong democratic controls are essential to the success of the Hague. The claims of biometrics are poorly communicated, soft law abounds with weak controls and inadequate levels of knowledge about the respective technologies and the possibilities opened by them. National parliaments with a strong EP must ensure accountability and legitimacy. There is an urgent need for a framework directive on data protection for law enforcement purposes before realising the principle of availability and widespread inter-operability, and to set out an EU model on biometricised egovernance.

Külső szerző

Juliet Lodge, Jean Monnet European Centre, Institute of Communication Studies, University of Leeds, UK