Afghanistan: Challenges and Perspectives until 2020

02-02-2017

The international Ministerial Conference on Afghanistan, held in Brussels on 4-5 October 2016, was a success. High representatives of 75 countries and 26 international organisations renewed their commitment to Afghanistan’s stability and development; they also pledged EUR 13.6 billion to support the unity government until 2020. However the country is going through very difficult times: in 2016 insurgents have committed more attacks, which have caused more victims, and controlled more territory than in 2015. The numbers of internally displaced people and of refugees returning to Afghanistan, particularly from Pakistan, have grown dramatically. The economic situation is bleak and the government has very limited capacities to provide basic services. The country requires continuous international support for economic development, regional economic cooperation and a reconciliation process leading to lasting peace.

The international Ministerial Conference on Afghanistan, held in Brussels on 4-5 October 2016, was a success. High representatives of 75 countries and 26 international organisations renewed their commitment to Afghanistan’s stability and development; they also pledged EUR 13.6 billion to support the unity government until 2020. However the country is going through very difficult times: in 2016 insurgents have committed more attacks, which have caused more victims, and controlled more territory than in 2015. The numbers of internally displaced people and of refugees returning to Afghanistan, particularly from Pakistan, have grown dramatically. The economic situation is bleak and the government has very limited capacities to provide basic services. The country requires continuous international support for economic development, regional economic cooperation and a reconciliation process leading to lasting peace.

Autore esterno

Giulia BONACQUISTI (Trans European Policy Studies Association - TEPSA, Belgium) and Victor TANZARELLA HARTMANN (Trans European Policy Studies Association - TEPSA, Belgium) (for the workshop report) ; Mona KANWAL SHEIKH (Danish Institute for International Studies, Denmark - for the briefing 1) ; Arne STRAND (U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre, Chr. Michelsen Institute, Norway - briefing 2) ; Richard GHIASY (Stockholm International Peace Research Institute - SIPRI, Sweden)