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EU space programme

15-05-2019

In June 2018, the European Commission proposed a total budget allocation of €16 billion to finance space activities during the 2021-2027 period. The bulk of this, €9.7 billion in current prices, would be allocated to Galileo and EGNOS, the EU's global and regional satellite navigation systems, €5.8 billion would be allocated to Copernicus, the EU's Earth Observation programme, and €500 million would be earmarked for security, such as the Space and Situational Awareness (SSA) programme and the new ...

In June 2018, the European Commission proposed a total budget allocation of €16 billion to finance space activities during the 2021-2027 period. The bulk of this, €9.7 billion in current prices, would be allocated to Galileo and EGNOS, the EU's global and regional satellite navigation systems, €5.8 billion would be allocated to Copernicus, the EU's Earth Observation programme, and €500 million would be earmarked for security, such as the Space and Situational Awareness (SSA) programme and the new Governmental Satellite Communication initiative (GOVSATCOM) to support border protection, civil protection and humanitarian interventions, for instance. The main aims of the new space programme are to secure EU leadership in space activities, foster innovative industries, safeguard autonomous access to space and simplify governance. The space programme would upgrade the European Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) Agency by expanding its tasks and transforming it into the new EU Agency for the Space Programme. In April 2019, after several trilogue meetings, Parliament and Council reached a partial agreement on the programme, covering the content, but not, among other things, budgetary issues. Parliament adopted its position at first reading in April. Further discussions on the outstanding issues can be expected once Council reaches agreement on the overall multiannual budget. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Establishing the European Space Programme

15-11-2018

The Commission proposed to continue the existing space services, launch new actions and to increase the budget allocation, bringing all space-related activities under the new EU Space programme. The supporting impact assessment merely presents the proposed measures without discussing alternatives or conducting a proper impact analysis, nor does it address the costs and benefits of transforming the Global Navigation Satellite System Agency into a European Union Agency for the Space Programme, thereby ...

The Commission proposed to continue the existing space services, launch new actions and to increase the budget allocation, bringing all space-related activities under the new EU Space programme. The supporting impact assessment merely presents the proposed measures without discussing alternatives or conducting a proper impact analysis, nor does it address the costs and benefits of transforming the Global Navigation Satellite System Agency into a European Union Agency for the Space Programme, thereby falling short of the Better Regulation Guidelines requirements.

Brexit and Industry and Space Policy - workshop proceedings

09-11-2018

This document summarises the presentations and discussions of the workshop of “Brexit and Industry and Space Policy”, which was held on 24 September 2018. The effects of Brexit on EU27 business, trade, value chains, innovation and space policy were assessed. This document was provided by the Policy Department for Economic, Scientific and Quality of Life Policies at the request of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE).

This document summarises the presentations and discussions of the workshop of “Brexit and Industry and Space Policy”, which was held on 24 September 2018. The effects of Brexit on EU27 business, trade, value chains, innovation and space policy were assessed. This document was provided by the Policy Department for Economic, Scientific and Quality of Life Policies at the request of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE).

Autore esterno

Bowen CALL, Bruegel Reinhilde VEUGELERS, Bruegel

Galileo Satellite Navigation System

25-10-2018

This study explains the background necessary for understanding of the Global Satellite Navigation System (GNSS) working principles and the importance of GNSS in our daily life and work. It highlights the specific socio-economic and strategic advantages enabled by the European satellite navigation system ‘Galileo’. It also identifies some of the gaps and challenges towards Galileo’s final operational capability expected in 2021. The study proposes different policy options in order to maximise the ...

This study explains the background necessary for understanding of the Global Satellite Navigation System (GNSS) working principles and the importance of GNSS in our daily life and work. It highlights the specific socio-economic and strategic advantages enabled by the European satellite navigation system ‘Galileo’. It also identifies some of the gaps and challenges towards Galileo’s final operational capability expected in 2021. The study proposes different policy options in order to maximise the impact of the European satellite navigation system in the near future and in the long term.

Autore esterno

DG, EPRS; EPRS, DG

Galileo and EGNOS

24-01-2018

Galileo and the European geostationary navigation overlay service (EGNOS) are two satellite navigation systems under civil control. Galileo is an autonomous global navigation satellite system consisting of a constellation of satellites and a global network of ground stations. EGNOS is a regional satellite navigation system that monitors, corrects and improves the accuracy of open signals emitted by existing global satellite navigation systems (GPS, Glonass). Galileo and EGNOS are infrastructures ...

Galileo and the European geostationary navigation overlay service (EGNOS) are two satellite navigation systems under civil control. Galileo is an autonomous global navigation satellite system consisting of a constellation of satellites and a global network of ground stations. EGNOS is a regional satellite navigation system that monitors, corrects and improves the accuracy of open signals emitted by existing global satellite navigation systems (GPS, Glonass). Galileo and EGNOS are infrastructures owned by the European Union, which were conceived in close cooperation with the European Space Agency. They guarantee Europe independent access to a reliable positioning satellite signal, allowing more accuracy than that offered by other accessible systems.

Copernicus – The EU's Earth observation and monitoring programme

24-10-2017

Copernicus is the European Union's Earth observation and monitoring programme. It has a space component and a ground-based component, and provides users with data services. It is a user-driven programme under civilian control, building on existing national and European capacities, and continuing the work of the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) programme. It is based on a partnership between the EU, the European Space Agency (ESA) and the EU Member States.

Copernicus is the European Union's Earth observation and monitoring programme. It has a space component and a ground-based component, and provides users with data services. It is a user-driven programme under civilian control, building on existing national and European capacities, and continuing the work of the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) programme. It is based on a partnership between the EU, the European Space Agency (ESA) and the EU Member States.

Galileo: Overcoming obstacles - History of EU global navigation satellite systems

06-04-2017

Galileo, the long-awaited European global navigation satellite systems, is at a turning point in its history: it reached initial operational capacity in December 2016 and is expected to be fully operational for 2021. This autonomous European civilian tool, which can be used anywhere on earth, transmits positioning and timing data from space for use on the ground to determine a user's location. Alongside it, the European geostationary navigation overlay system (EGNOS), which improves the accuracy ...

Galileo, the long-awaited European global navigation satellite systems, is at a turning point in its history: it reached initial operational capacity in December 2016 and is expected to be fully operational for 2021. This autonomous European civilian tool, which can be used anywhere on earth, transmits positioning and timing data from space for use on the ground to determine a user's location. Alongside it, the European geostationary navigation overlay system (EGNOS), which improves the accuracy and integrity of the American global positioning system (GPS) over EU territory, became fully operational in 2011. Despite decades of delays, difficulties and additional costs, Galileo and EGNOS have benefited from the continuous support of all EU institutions, and the European Union (EU) decided to provide the funding needed to complete both programmes. Galileo and EGNOS became the first infrastructure to be owned by the EU. Delays and cost over-runs can be explained through political, technical, industrial and security issues. It is estimated that by 2020, the EU and European Space Agency will have invested more than €13 billion in these programmes. This public investment, although much larger than that initially planned, matches the cost of similar programmes such as GPS, and is justified by the need for the European Union to have strategic autonomy in the field. The market uptake of the services and data provided by EGNOS and Galileo is a key priority of the European space strategy adopted in October 2016.