82

risultato/i

Parola(e)
Tipo di pubblicazione
Settore di intervento
Autore
Parole chiave
Data

Reform Support Programme 2021-2027

13-03-2019

The European Commission adopted the proposal on the establishment of the Reform Support Programme on 31 May 2018, as part of the package for the upcoming multiannual financial framework for 2021-2027. The programme will provide financial and technical support for Member States to implement reforms aimed at increasing the resilience of their economies and modernising them, including priority reforms identified in the European Semester. The overall budget for the programme is €25 billion. It comprises ...

The European Commission adopted the proposal on the establishment of the Reform Support Programme on 31 May 2018, as part of the package for the upcoming multiannual financial framework for 2021-2027. The programme will provide financial and technical support for Member States to implement reforms aimed at increasing the resilience of their economies and modernising them, including priority reforms identified in the European Semester. The overall budget for the programme is €25 billion. It comprises three elements: a reform delivery tool (financial support); a Technical Support Instrument (technical expertise, building on the current Structural Reform Support Programme 2017-2020); and a convergence facility (preparation for adopting the euro). The Reform Support Programme will be open to all Member States on a voluntary basis, with no co-financing required. In the European Parliament, the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (ECON) and Committee on Budgets (BUDG) are working jointly on this file under Rule 55 of Parliament's Rules of Procedure. A vote in the joint committee meeting is expected on 1 April 2019, with a vote in plenary thereafter, during the second April 2019 part-session. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Establishing a European Investment Stabilisation Function

17-01-2019

The European Commission has proposed to establish a European Investment Stabilisation Function. The accompanying IA focusses on the expected positive effects of the proposal, rather than providing a balanced assessment of different policy options and all their relevant impacts. The mostly qualitative analysis is complemented by some quantifications that are, to the Commission’s own admission, based on uncertain assumptions. The caveats, methods and models of the IA could have been better explained ...

The European Commission has proposed to establish a European Investment Stabilisation Function. The accompanying IA focusses on the expected positive effects of the proposal, rather than providing a balanced assessment of different policy options and all their relevant impacts. The mostly qualitative analysis is complemented by some quantifications that are, to the Commission’s own admission, based on uncertain assumptions. The caveats, methods and models of the IA could have been better explained to increase its transparency. The selection of the preferred option seems to be based on political considerations.

Child labour: A priority for EU human rights action

15-01-2019

Despite a comprehensive normative international framework that prohibits child labour, it persists in many areas of the world, particularly in developing countries. In sub-Saharan-Africa, it has even increased in recent years. More efforts are therefore needed to combat child labour. However, not all work performed by children is harmful to their health and development. The first task is therefore to distinguish child labour – which entails harmful forms of work – from other forms of children's involvement ...

Despite a comprehensive normative international framework that prohibits child labour, it persists in many areas of the world, particularly in developing countries. In sub-Saharan-Africa, it has even increased in recent years. More efforts are therefore needed to combat child labour. However, not all work performed by children is harmful to their health and development. The first task is therefore to distinguish child labour – which entails harmful forms of work – from other forms of children's involvement with work that are acceptable and have an educational component. While international conventions provide a broad definition of child labour, they leave the task of defining more precise criteria, such as the acceptable number of working hours per week or what constitutes hazardous work, to national legislation. Child labour is a complex phenomenon that has a multiplicity of causes, among which poverty usually features first. It requires a comprehensive approach to fight it, including awareness-raising among families and local communities, due diligence by companies involved in global supply chains, and action by governments, international organisations and civil society. The European Union protects children's rights through both its internal and external policies. It has deployed measures to fight child labour through cooperation with international organisations and has funded development projects whose aim is to counter it. The human rights conditionality enshrined in the EU's trade arrangements provides another path for tackling child labour. Nevertheless, there are numerous calls from civil society and the European Parliament to impose binding legal obligations on EU-based companies, to make sure their imports of goods from developing countries are free of child labour.

European Investment Stabilisation Function (EISF)

10-01-2019

The idea behind the Commission's proposed European Investment Stabilisation Function is to use dedicated financial means from the EU budget to help Member States stabilise their economies in the event of a major asymmetric shock. The Commission would borrow on the financial markets and then lend to the country concerned, which would use the money to finance public investment. Once the crisis was over, the Member State would reimburse the debt. The Commission hopes the other Member States would agree ...

The idea behind the Commission's proposed European Investment Stabilisation Function is to use dedicated financial means from the EU budget to help Member States stabilise their economies in the event of a major asymmetric shock. The Commission would borrow on the financial markets and then lend to the country concerned, which would use the money to finance public investment. Once the crisis was over, the Member State would reimburse the debt. The Commission hopes the other Member States would agree to subsidise the interest payments incurred. The function would be limited to euro-area countries, but those that have entered the exchange rate mechanism II (ERM II) might also benefit. The lending would be quasi automatic once statistical data showed an exceptional and steep rise in unemployment. The dossier has met with considerable opposition at Council level.

Instrument for Pre-accession Assistance (IPA III)

23-11-2018

On 14 June 2018, the European Commission published a proposal for a regulation establishing the Instrument for Pre-accession Assistance (IPA) III as part of a set of external action instruments under the new 2021 to 2027 multiannual financial framework (MFF). The proposed financial envelope represents a 1.1 % decrease compared with current funding (€12.9 billion in 2018 prices). Beneficiaries include the Western Balkan countries and Turkey. The IPA, set up for the 2007 to 2013 MFF, aims to prepare ...

On 14 June 2018, the European Commission published a proposal for a regulation establishing the Instrument for Pre-accession Assistance (IPA) III as part of a set of external action instruments under the new 2021 to 2027 multiannual financial framework (MFF). The proposed financial envelope represents a 1.1 % decrease compared with current funding (€12.9 billion in 2018 prices). Beneficiaries include the Western Balkan countries and Turkey. The IPA, set up for the 2007 to 2013 MFF, aims to prepare candidate and potential candidate countries for EU membership and supports them in adopting and implementing the necessary political, institutional, legal, administrative, social and economic reforms. IPA III is clearly positioned in the context of the new Western Balkan strategy, adopted in February 2018, and builds in flexibility via à vis the evolving situation in Turkey. It is also designed to complement the EU's internal policies. In Parliament, the file has been allocated to the Committee for Foreign Affairs (AFET), with José Ignacio Salafranca Sánchez-Neyra (EPP, Spain) and Knut Fleckenstein (S&D, Germany) as co-rapporteurs. The draft report presented by the rapporteurs on 30 October 2018 is now awaiting adoption by AFET. First edition. EU Legislation in Progress briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Reform Support Programme

23-10-2018

Among the legislative proposals for the spending programmes of the MFF 2021-2027, the European Commission has proposed to establish a Reform Support Programme for structural reforms. The IA accompanying the proposal provides a good review of the baseline scenario, the problem to tackle and the objectives to achieve. However, it concentrates on the expected positive effects of the programme, rather than assessing thoroughly the impacts of alternative options against the baseline scenario like a standard ...

Among the legislative proposals for the spending programmes of the MFF 2021-2027, the European Commission has proposed to establish a Reform Support Programme for structural reforms. The IA accompanying the proposal provides a good review of the baseline scenario, the problem to tackle and the objectives to achieve. However, it concentrates on the expected positive effects of the programme, rather than assessing thoroughly the impacts of alternative options against the baseline scenario like a standard IA. The presentation of the delivery mechanisms is mostly qualitative, with a couple of quantified references that could have been better explained and substantiated. The IA remains vague on the precise scope of the voluntary programme and several implementation details and implies that its impacts depend to a large extent on the implementation by the Member States, which makes an ex-ante assessment challenging.

European defence industrial development programme (EDIDP)

28-09-2018

The European Union is facing new security threats amid growing uncertainty about the reliability of some of its allies. As a consequence, it has embarked on a general scalingup of its defence capabilities. A European defence action plan has been agreed and a European Defence Fund created to provide financial support, ranging from the research phase to the acquisition phase of military equipment and technologies. The EDIDP, which will be part of that fund, is destined to provide the European defence ...

The European Union is facing new security threats amid growing uncertainty about the reliability of some of its allies. As a consequence, it has embarked on a general scalingup of its defence capabilities. A European defence action plan has been agreed and a European Defence Fund created to provide financial support, ranging from the research phase to the acquisition phase of military equipment and technologies. The EDIDP, which will be part of that fund, is destined to provide the European defence industry with financial support during the development phase of new products and technologies in areas selected at European level. An agreement was reached in trilogue negotiations in May 2018, and after Parliament and Council had approved the deal, the final legislative act was signed on 18 July 2018. This programme, with a financial envelope of €500 million, is due to run from January 2019 to December 2020.

European Solidarity Corps

11-09-2018

The Commission launched the European Solidarity Corps in a December 2016 communication, and the present proposal for a regulation would set its legal basis, define the budgetary and implementation arrangements, specify objectives and define key terms. The Corps would have a volunteering strand on the one hand and a smaller occupational strand (traineeships and jobs) on the other. All placements focus on solidarity actions and will last between 2 to 12 months. The proposal set a target of 100 000 ...

The Commission launched the European Solidarity Corps in a December 2016 communication, and the present proposal for a regulation would set its legal basis, define the budgetary and implementation arrangements, specify objectives and define key terms. The Corps would have a volunteering strand on the one hand and a smaller occupational strand (traineeships and jobs) on the other. All placements focus on solidarity actions and will last between 2 to 12 months. The proposal set a target of 100 000 participants, with a proposed budget of €341.5 million, for the 2018-2020 period. In its resolution on the issue in April 2017, the European Parliament had insisted that the initiative should not drain other programmes. Notwithstanding that, the Commission proposed that only 25 % of the budget would be new money. Parliament reiterated its position in its resolution of July 2017 and again in the report adopted by the CULT committee ahead of trilogue negotiations. Council, however, came to the negotiating table seeking a budget that was totally dependent on redeployments. Finally, the European Parliament negotiators managed to secure €76 million (20 %) fresh money, complemented by a redistribution that favours volunteering more strongly, and the inclusion of safeguards to avoid exploitation for profit-making purposes. Second edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

An overview of the EU-ACP countries' economic partnership agreements: Building a new trade relationship

03-07-2018

In line with the objective enshrined in the Cotonou Partnership Agreement (signed in 2000), the EU has sought to update its preferential trade relationship with the ACP countries by establishing free-trade areas with regional groupings. As well as allowing ACP countries to continue exporting their products to the EU without any restriction, this would also ensure compliance with WTO rules. The negotiation process has been longer and more complicated than initially expected. So far, it has ushered ...

In line with the objective enshrined in the Cotonou Partnership Agreement (signed in 2000), the EU has sought to update its preferential trade relationship with the ACP countries by establishing free-trade areas with regional groupings. As well as allowing ACP countries to continue exporting their products to the EU without any restriction, this would also ensure compliance with WTO rules. The negotiation process has been longer and more complicated than initially expected. So far, it has ushered in nine agreements covering more than half (51) of the ACP countries. Some of these agreements are interim, others are final; seven are already under provisional application. Economic partnership agreements are development-oriented asymmetric agreements providing important advantages and safeguards to ACP countries, in order to foster their sustainable economic development, regional integration and integration on world markets. They are the first attempt to liberalise trade between economies with such a disparate level of development, which also possibly explains the difficulties encountered during the negotiations. Despite the EU's initial ambitions to conclude modern comprehensive agreements that also cover trade in services and trade-related issues, this has been fully possible only in the EPA with the Cariforum region; in the other EPAs, these elements have been left for future negotiations.

European Union Solidarity Fund

28-06-2018

Established in 2002 to support disaster-stricken regions, the European Union Solidarity Fund (EUSF) complements the efforts of public authorities by helping to fund vital emergency and recovery operations in areas affected by catastrophes such as flooding, earthquakes or forest fires. With an annual budget of €500 million, EUSF funding is granted following an application from a Member State or candidate country, and may be used to finance measures including restoring infrastructure to working order ...

Established in 2002 to support disaster-stricken regions, the European Union Solidarity Fund (EUSF) complements the efforts of public authorities by helping to fund vital emergency and recovery operations in areas affected by catastrophes such as flooding, earthquakes or forest fires. With an annual budget of €500 million, EUSF funding is granted following an application from a Member State or candidate country, and may be used to finance measures including restoring infrastructure to working order, providing temporary accommodation or cleaning up disaster areas. Although a revision of the EUSF Regulation took place in 2014, simplifying rules and clarifying eligibility criteria, several problems still remain. European Commission reports on the EUSF have drawn attention to the long waiting time countries still face before receiving EUSF funding, while industry experts also point to the risk that the EUSF could run out of funding in the event of several large disasters taking place within a short space of time. With a number of major natural disasters occurring over the past years, the EUSF has attracted renewed attention, leading the European Commission to put forward new proposals addressing the issue of post-disaster support. Parliament was also actively involved in these discussions, adopting a resolution on the EUSF in December 2016 which included several measures aimed at improving its operations, also calling on Member States to use ESI funds to invest in disaster prevention. Recent developments, such as new rules that allow reconstruction operations to be financed under the European Regional Development Fund and the proposal for a reinforced Civil Protection Mechanism, have helped create greater coherence between the EUSF and other EU measures. Perhaps most importantly, by complementing the work of the EUSF, these measures have the potential to improve the effectiveness of the EU's disaster prevention and response operations. The planned increase in the EUSF budget outlined under the recent MFF proposal can also help contribute to this process by strengthening the EUSF's response capacity, yet these plans will be subject to tough negotiations in the Council and Parliament. The next few months will arguably be of critical importance for ensuring the continued strength of the EU's disaster response capabilities and, in particular, the EUSF's role within this process. This is an updated edition of a Briefing published in January 2017, PE 595.896.

Partner

Restare connessi

email update imageSistema di aggiornamento per e-mail

Il sistema di aggiornamento per e-mail, che invia le ultime informazioni direttamente al tuo indirizzo di posta elettronica, ti permetterà di seguire tutte le persone e gli eventi legati al Parlamento, tra cui le ultime notizie riguardanti i deputati, i servizi di informazione o il Think Tank.

Potrai accedere al sistema da qualsiasi pagina del sito web del Parlamento. Per iscriverti e ricevere le notifiche relative al Think Tank, sarà sufficiente fornire l'indirizzo di posta elettronica, selezionare il tema che ti interessa, indicare con quale frequenza desideri ricevere le informazioni (quotidiana, settimanale o mensile) e confermare l'iscrizione facendo clic sul link che riceverai via mail.

RSS imageFlussi RSS

Segui tutte le notizie e gli aggiornamenti del sito del Parlamento grazie ai flussi RSS.

Per configurare il tuo flusso RSS, fai clic sul link qui sotto.