12

risultato/i

Parola(e)
Tipo di pubblicazione
Settore di intervento
Autore
Parole chiave
Data

International Agreements in Progress: EU-New Zealand free trade agreement - All set for the launch of negotiations

11-10-2017

New Zealand already enjoys a number of bilateral trade cooperation agreements with the EU. These agreements pave the way for negotiations on a free trade agreement (FTA) between the EU and New Zealand. However, both sides are expected to raise several sensitive issues during negotiations, not least because New Zealand is a major and competitive producer and exporter of agricultural goods. The EU is committed to taking European agricultural sensitivities fully into consideration in its negotiating ...

New Zealand already enjoys a number of bilateral trade cooperation agreements with the EU. These agreements pave the way for negotiations on a free trade agreement (FTA) between the EU and New Zealand. However, both sides are expected to raise several sensitive issues during negotiations, not least because New Zealand is a major and competitive producer and exporter of agricultural goods. The EU is committed to taking European agricultural sensitivities fully into consideration in its negotiating strategy, seeking to protect vulnerable sectors through specific provisions. In addition to facilitating trade and investment flows between the parties, the FTA would create a level playing field for the EU with other trading partners that have already concluded FTAs with New Zealand. The FTA would also strengthen the EU's position in Asia-Pacific value chains, and help to advance the trade policy interests of the EU in the region. On 13 September 2017, the European Commission presented draft negotiating directives for an FTA with New Zealand. This draft mandate, in line with the EU Court of Justice's recent opinion on the EU-Singapore FTA, covers only areas falling under the EU's exclusive competence. Therefore, the prospective agreement could be concluded by the EU on its own and could be ratified at EU level only. The Commission aims to finalise negotiations before the end of its mandate in late 2019.

Smart Single Market regulation in the area of professional services

15-09-2017

• In the Communication on reform recommendations [COM(2017)8290 final], the European Commission has shown how the regulation of professional services is a significant policy issue for the Single Market. It also underlines the relevance of policy action in this area in the wider context of European labour markets and EU strategies and policies. • The policy objectives for the reform recommendations need to be articulated more clearly. This includes being clear that Member States need to balance the ...

• In the Communication on reform recommendations [COM(2017)8290 final], the European Commission has shown how the regulation of professional services is a significant policy issue for the Single Market. It also underlines the relevance of policy action in this area in the wider context of European labour markets and EU strategies and policies. • The policy objectives for the reform recommendations need to be articulated more clearly. This includes being clear that Member States need to balance the costs and benefits of regulatory reform. The reform process is not just about reducing the cost of regulation, it also recognises the benefits of regulation and seeks to encourage better regulation. • Experiences during the mutual evaluation suggest strongly that Member States need guidance from the Commission on how to undertake the process of balancing costs and benefits as they implement the reform recommendations. The European Commission needs to review why Member States faced problems with this process and apply lessons learnt in order to assist Member States with the implementation of the reform recommendations. • When legislating the European Parliament should ensure that the European Commission has the following tasks: publication of detailed monitoring and evaluation plans; annual repetition of the EU Survey of Regulated Occupations; and the creation of a central repository for sharing evidence and data. • When legislating, the European Parliament should ensure that Member States are recommended to follow the guidelines on regulation of professional services issued by the European Commission and to cooperate with each other and with the European Commission in the development and sharing of evidence.

Autore esterno

Sion Jones

The consequences of Brexit on Services and Establishment. Different Scenarios for Exit and Future Cooperation

15-06-2017

This paper addresses the challenges Brexit will pose to the future of trade in services between the EU and the UK. It discusses the specific barriers to cross-border establishment and trade in services and possible solutions for a future EU-UK trade agreement. Hereby, it takes existing EU Free Trade Agreements with other states into consideration. This research paper has been commissioned by Policy Department at the request of the Internal Market and Consumer Protection Committee.

This paper addresses the challenges Brexit will pose to the future of trade in services between the EU and the UK. It discusses the specific barriers to cross-border establishment and trade in services and possible solutions for a future EU-UK trade agreement. Hereby, it takes existing EU Free Trade Agreements with other states into consideration. This research paper has been commissioned by Policy Department at the request of the Internal Market and Consumer Protection Committee.

European disability policy: From defining disability to adopting a strategy

12-06-2017

More than 70 million people in the EU, close to one in six, have a disability. Many of them encounter difficulties performing simple daily tasks, pursuing studies and getting a job. That is why, alongside and in support of Member State policies, the EU has committed to combating all forms of discrimination to which disabled people are particularly vulnerable.

More than 70 million people in the EU, close to one in six, have a disability. Many of them encounter difficulties performing simple daily tasks, pursuing studies and getting a job. That is why, alongside and in support of Member State policies, the EU has committed to combating all forms of discrimination to which disabled people are particularly vulnerable.

Cohesion policy and disability

06-03-2017

People with disabilities are among the most vulnerable in society. While disability policy is primarily a Member State competence, the EU is committed to improving the living conditions of all people with disabilities and, in particular, to addressing the issue of institutionalised care. Cohesion policy can play a key role in this process. The cohesion policy framework sets out 11 thematic objectives closely aligned to the goals of the Europe 2020 strategy, including promoting social inclusion, combating ...

People with disabilities are among the most vulnerable in society. While disability policy is primarily a Member State competence, the EU is committed to improving the living conditions of all people with disabilities and, in particular, to addressing the issue of institutionalised care. Cohesion policy can play a key role in this process. The cohesion policy framework sets out 11 thematic objectives closely aligned to the goals of the Europe 2020 strategy, including promoting social inclusion, combating poverty and any discrimination; this objective allows Member States to focus structural funds (ESIF) specifically on delivering support for people with disabilities. A new emphasis on partnerships involving disability organisations in ESIF programming as well as measures to prevent discrimination and ensure accessibility for people with disabilities through the use of special pre-conditions, ex ante conditionalities, aim to ensure that the views of disabled people are taken into account and their fundamental rights respected. Yet while operational programmes contain a broad range of measures to support people with disabilities, with the European Commission also reporting that Member States have respected the partnership principle during ESIF programming and fulfilled many of the ex ante conditionalities in place, the view of stakeholders has been more mixed. Pointing to issues such as excessive reporting requirements or a low level of knowledge among beneficiaries, they also have reservations about the quality of the participation of disability organisations in ESIF decision-making, raising questions as to the likely impact of the planned measures. Looking to the future, stakeholders emphasise the need to ensure the participation of disability organisations in all ESIF decision-making, and stress the importance of funding, potentially difficult in the context of increasing pressures on the EU budget.

Gender Equal Access to Goods and Services Directive 2004/113/EC

24-01-2017

Directive 2004/113/EC is part of EU anti-discrimination law and sets minimum rules for ensuring gender equality in access to and supply of goods and services. Its implementation across EU Member States is critically assessed in this study. It concludes that the notion of ‘indirect discrimination’ requires increased attention, for example in the health sector or in relation to the rapidly developing collaborative economy. Multiple cause-effect relationships require that gender equality in accessing ...

Directive 2004/113/EC is part of EU anti-discrimination law and sets minimum rules for ensuring gender equality in access to and supply of goods and services. Its implementation across EU Member States is critically assessed in this study. It concludes that the notion of ‘indirect discrimination’ requires increased attention, for example in the health sector or in relation to the rapidly developing collaborative economy. Multiple cause-effect relationships require that gender equality in accessing goods and services is pursued by the application of this directive in synergy with other gender equality, anti-discrimination, accessibility and consumer protection law. This European implementation assessment is intended to support the implementation report being prepared on the subject by the European Parliament’s Committee on Women's Rights and Gender Equality.

Japan: Economic indicators and trade with EU

16-12-2016

Japan is one of the most developed countries in the world. Its per capita GDP, though lower than in the past, is still higher than that of the EU. Unemployment is traditionally low. In terms of the Human Development Index (HDI), Japan is better placed than many EU Member States. However, it also has the largest public debt among the OECD countries and slow GDP growth. The EU-Japan Free Trade Agreement currently being negotiated may exploit the untapped potential of economic relations. For instance ...

Japan is one of the most developed countries in the world. Its per capita GDP, though lower than in the past, is still higher than that of the EU. Unemployment is traditionally low. In terms of the Human Development Index (HDI), Japan is better placed than many EU Member States. However, it also has the largest public debt among the OECD countries and slow GDP growth. The EU-Japan Free Trade Agreement currently being negotiated may exploit the untapped potential of economic relations. For instance, Japanese FDI inflows to the EU are decreasing, while EU investment in Japan is far from significant, despite a generally favourable Japanese business environment. Please click here for the full publication in PDF format

Proceedings of the Workshop on "Relations between Franchisors and Franchisees: Regulatory Framework and Current Challenges"

15-11-2016

The workshop organised by the Policy Department A for the IMCO Committee aimed at discussing problems in the area of franchising and the impact of the EU rules on functioning of the franchising contract. It allowed exchange of views on market conditions in the EU as well as corrective legislative and regulatory actions.

The workshop organised by the Policy Department A for the IMCO Committee aimed at discussing problems in the area of franchising and the impact of the EU rules on functioning of the franchising contract. It allowed exchange of views on market conditions in the EU as well as corrective legislative and regulatory actions.

Autore esterno

Magda SCHUSTEROVÁ and Aneta WIEWIÓROWSKA-DOMAGALSKA (Osnabrück University, Germany)

The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP): Challenges and Opportunities for the Internal Market and Consumer Protection in the Area of Services

15-09-2015

This paper was prepared by Policy Department A at the request of the European Parliament’s Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection. It finds that there is significant scope for the EU to benefit from freeing up of transatlantic services trade while safeguarding European values and preserving the right to regulate. Importantly, TTIP negotiation of reduced transatlantic regulatory barriers will help unify the internal EU services market, leading to significant increases in intra-EU ...

This paper was prepared by Policy Department A at the request of the European Parliament’s Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection. It finds that there is significant scope for the EU to benefit from freeing up of transatlantic services trade while safeguarding European values and preserving the right to regulate. Importantly, TTIP negotiation of reduced transatlantic regulatory barriers will help unify the internal EU services market, leading to significant increases in intra-EU services trade.

Autore esterno

Kenneth HEYDON (London School of Economics and Political Science, the UK)

The Cost of Non-Europe in the Single Market. Part II - Single Market for Services

24-09-2014

Cost of Non-Europe Reports identify the possibilities for economic or other gains and/or the realisation of a ‘public good’ through common action at EU level in specific policy areas and sectors. This Cost of Non-Europe Report seeks to analyse the costs for citizens, businesses and relevant stake-holders of remaining gaps and barriers in the European Single Market, building on and updating the 1988 Cecchini Report, which quantified its potential benefits. This particular study - the second in a series ...

Cost of Non-Europe Reports identify the possibilities for economic or other gains and/or the realisation of a ‘public good’ through common action at EU level in specific policy areas and sectors. This Cost of Non-Europe Report seeks to analyse the costs for citizens, businesses and relevant stake-holders of remaining gaps and barriers in the European Single Market, building on and updating the 1988 Cecchini Report, which quantified its potential benefits. This particular study - the second in a series - attempts to take stock of the remaining gaps or deficits in intra-EU market access obligations in services, and the related deficits in the proper functioning of the internal market for services. It also tries to identify the quantitative and qualitative economic gains of overcoming the costs of non-Europe of the remaining fragmentation, insofar as the EU can address such deficits.

Prossimi eventi

20-11-2019
Europe's Future: Where next for EU institutional Reform?
Altro evento -
EPRS

Partner

Restare connessi

email update imageSistema di aggiornamento per e-mail

Il sistema di aggiornamento per e-mail, che invia le ultime informazioni direttamente al tuo indirizzo di posta elettronica, ti permetterà di seguire tutte le persone e gli eventi legati al Parlamento, tra cui le ultime notizie riguardanti i deputati, i servizi di informazione o il Think Tank.

Potrai accedere al sistema da qualsiasi pagina del sito web del Parlamento. Per iscriverti e ricevere le notifiche relative al Think Tank, sarà sufficiente fornire l'indirizzo di posta elettronica, selezionare il tema che ti interessa, indicare con quale frequenza desideri ricevere le informazioni (quotidiana, settimanale o mensile) e confermare l'iscrizione facendo clic sul link che riceverai via mail.

RSS imageFlussi RSS

Segui tutte le notizie e gli aggiornamenti del sito del Parlamento grazie ai flussi RSS.

Per configurare il tuo flusso RSS, fai clic sul link qui sotto.