9

risultato/i

Parola(e)
Tipo di pubblicazione
Settore di intervento
Autore
Data

Gli strumenti della PAC e le loro riforme

01-04-2018

La politica agricola comune ha conosciuto, nel corso del tempo, cinque grandi riforme, le più recenti delle quali nel 2003 (revisione intermedia), nel 2009 («valutazione dello stato di salute») e nel 2013 (per il periodo finanziario 2014-2020). Le prime discussioni sulla PAC successiva al 2020 sono iniziate nel 2016 e le corrispondenti proposte legislative sono state presentate nel giugno 2018.

La politica agricola comune ha conosciuto, nel corso del tempo, cinque grandi riforme, le più recenti delle quali nel 2003 (revisione intermedia), nel 2009 («valutazione dello stato di salute») e nel 2013 (per il periodo finanziario 2014-2020). Le prime discussioni sulla PAC successiva al 2020 sono iniziate nel 2016 e le corrispondenti proposte legislative sono state presentate nel giugno 2018.

Il primo pilastro della PAC: I — l'Organizzazione comune dei mercati (OCM) dei prodotti agricoli

01-04-2018

L'OCM inquadra le misure di mercato previste nell'ambito della PAC. Una serie di riforme ha portato alla fusione, nel 2007, di 21 OCM in una OCM unica relativa a tutti i prodotti agricoli. Parallelamente, le revisioni della PAC l'hanno gradualmente orientata sempre più verso i mercati e hanno ridotto la portata degli strumenti di intervento, che sono ora considerati «reti di sicurezza», da utilizzare soltanto in caso di crisi.

L'OCM inquadra le misure di mercato previste nell'ambito della PAC. Una serie di riforme ha portato alla fusione, nel 2007, di 21 OCM in una OCM unica relativa a tutti i prodotti agricoli. Parallelamente, le revisioni della PAC l'hanno gradualmente orientata sempre più verso i mercati e hanno ridotto la portata degli strumenti di intervento, che sono ora considerati «reti di sicurezza», da utilizzare soltanto in caso di crisi.

Precision agriculture in Europe:Legal, social and ethical considerations

13-11-2017

The aim of this study is to illustrate the different ways in which the current EU legislative framework may be affected by the digitisation and automation of farming activities and the respective technological trends. The study analyses the issues that might have to be dealt with, identifying the European Parliament committees concerned and the legislative acts that might need to be revisited, especially in view of the forthcoming Commission communication on the future of the Common Agricultural ...

The aim of this study is to illustrate the different ways in which the current EU legislative framework may be affected by the digitisation and automation of farming activities and the respective technological trends. The study analyses the issues that might have to be dealt with, identifying the European Parliament committees concerned and the legislative acts that might need to be revisited, especially in view of the forthcoming Commission communication on the future of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). It also provides a series of overarching recommendations that EU actors may wish to take into account when dealing with precision agriculture. To do so, an analysis of the multiple ethical and legal challenges associated with precision farming technologies has been performed, along with a scanning of current legislation in a wide range of areas of EU policy-making, including agricultural policy and related fields, such as environment, health, food safety and climate change.

Research for AGRI Committee - The Post-Quotas EU Sugar Sector

03-06-2016

The liberalisation of the sugar market in the EU will bring about changes in the sugar sector. Elimination of production quotas and the minimum price for the purchase of sugar beet will affect competition and sugar production. Foreign trade will play a key role in the market balance. The EU market will become strongly linked to the world market. The sugar sector is of strategic importance and CAP market policy should include instruments that allow the maintenance of sugar production.

The liberalisation of the sugar market in the EU will bring about changes in the sugar sector. Elimination of production quotas and the minimum price for the purchase of sugar beet will affect competition and sugar production. Foreign trade will play a key role in the market balance. The EU market will become strongly linked to the world market. The sugar sector is of strategic importance and CAP market policy should include instruments that allow the maintenance of sugar production.

Autore esterno

Piotr Szajner, Barbara Wieliczko, Marek Wigier, Mariusz Hamulczuk and Wioletta Wrzaszcz (Institute of Agricultural and Food Economics - National Research Institute, Poland)

Research for AGRI Committee - State of Play of Risk Management Tools Implemented by Member States During the Period 2014-2020: National and European Framework

15-03-2016

The study aims at reviewing the implementing arrangements adopted recently by the EU Member States with regard to the risk management provisions in the agricultural sector. The study develops a general overview of the state of play of risk management in 2014/2020 Rural Development Programmes submitted by Member States (or Regions); examines similarities and differences in risk management tools implemented in order to gain a better understanding of their scope, their design, their limits and their ...

The study aims at reviewing the implementing arrangements adopted recently by the EU Member States with regard to the risk management provisions in the agricultural sector. The study develops a general overview of the state of play of risk management in 2014/2020 Rural Development Programmes submitted by Member States (or Regions); examines similarities and differences in risk management tools implemented in order to gain a better understanding of their scope, their design, their limits and their potential efficiency; and suggests future CAP developments related to risk management in order to deal more effectively with income uncertainties and market volatility.

Autore esterno

Isabel Bardají and Alberto Garrido (Coordinators ; Research Centre for the Management of Agricultural and Environmental Risks - CEIGRAM) ; Irene Blanco, Ana Felis and José María Sumpsi (Research Centre for the Management of Agricultural and Environmental Risks - CEIGRAM, France) ; Tomás García-Azcárate (Institute of Economics, Geography and Demography - CSIC, France) ; with the collaboration of: Geoffroy Enjolras (University Grenoble Alpes, France) ; Fabian Capitanio (University of Naples Federico II, Italy)

Organic farming legislation - Revision of regulation on organic production and labelling of organic products

20-10-2015

The development of organic production is a political objective of the EU. Although its organic market has constantly expanded, the EU's organic land area still represents only 6% of the total agricultural area and the difference between EU demand and production is covered by growing imports. To overcome the regulatory obstacles to the development of the sector and increase consumer confidence in the EU organic logo, in March 2014 the Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation on organic production ...

The development of organic production is a political objective of the EU. Although its organic market has constantly expanded, the EU's organic land area still represents only 6% of the total agricultural area and the difference between EU demand and production is covered by growing imports. To overcome the regulatory obstacles to the development of the sector and increase consumer confidence in the EU organic logo, in March 2014 the Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation on organic production and labelling of organic products, repealing Regulation No 834/2007. EU Agriculture Ministers agreed in June 2015 on a Council general approach to the proposal. On 13 October 2015, the Parliament's Agriculture Committee voted on its draft report on the proposal and the mandate to begin negotiations with the Council. This briefing updates an earlier edition, of 10 September 2015: PE568.317. Please click here for the full publication in PDF format

Organic farming legislation - Revision of regulation on organic production and labelling of organic products

11-09-2015

The development of organic production is a political objective of the EU. Although its organic market has constantly expanded, the EU's organic land area still represents less than 6% of the total agricultural area and the difference between EU demand and production is covered by growing imports. To overcome the regulatory obstacles to the development of the sector and increase consumer confidence in the EU organic logo, the European Commission adopted in March 2014 a proposal for a Regulation on ...

The development of organic production is a political objective of the EU. Although its organic market has constantly expanded, the EU's organic land area still represents less than 6% of the total agricultural area and the difference between EU demand and production is covered by growing imports. To overcome the regulatory obstacles to the development of the sector and increase consumer confidence in the EU organic logo, the European Commission adopted in March 2014 a proposal for a Regulation on organic production and labelling of organic products, repealing Council Regulation (EC) No 834/2007. EU Agriculture Ministers agreed in June 2015 on a Council general approach to the proposal while Parliament's Agriculture Committee is expected to vote on its draft report on the proposal in October. A more recent edition of this document is available. Find it by searching by the document title at this address: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/thinktank/en/home.html

Organic production and the European Union

16-02-2015

Organic agriculture views itself as respecting natural cycles by refraining from the use of genetically modified organisms, by limiting the use of synthetic chemical products and by ensuring animal welfare. Organic production, regulated and supported at EU level, is controlled, certified and labelled. The specifications list also adapts to different kinds of production. Initially a niche market, organic agriculture now represents a European market worth more than EUR 22 billion a year, with demand ...

Organic agriculture views itself as respecting natural cycles by refraining from the use of genetically modified organisms, by limiting the use of synthetic chemical products and by ensuring animal welfare. Organic production, regulated and supported at EU level, is controlled, certified and labelled. The specifications list also adapts to different kinds of production. Initially a niche market, organic agriculture now represents a European market worth more than EUR 22 billion a year, with demand continuing to increase. The organic sector, seeking a vision for the future, must respond to certain challenges, particularly in its coexistence with conventional agriculture, but also in terms of producer and consumer confidence in the system and its values, in a context of growing international exchanges. In March 2014, the European Commission proposed to revise the entire legislative framework of the organic sector, in particular with the aim of reducing the current derogation practices, reviewing the control system and the import regime, simplifying the legislation and cutting down on the red tape. Some initial reactions to these proposals seem rather critical. The first reading legislative appraisal has started in the European Parliament, but the announcement of the new "Juncker Commission" of its intention to withdraw this proposal by mid-2015 should an agreement not be reached by then could change the context.

EU legislation on Organic Production and Labelling: Implementation Appraisal

13-11-2014

This is the first in a new series of 'Implementation Appraisals', produced by the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS), on the operation of existing EU legislation in practice. Each such briefing focuses on a specific EU law which is, or will shortly be, subject to an amending proposal from the European Commission, intended to update the current text. The series is based on the Commission’s intentions, as announced in its annual Work Programme (CWP). 'Implementation Appraisals' aim to provide ...

This is the first in a new series of 'Implementation Appraisals', produced by the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS), on the operation of existing EU legislation in practice. Each such briefing focuses on a specific EU law which is, or will shortly be, subject to an amending proposal from the European Commission, intended to update the current text. The series is based on the Commission’s intentions, as announced in its annual Work Programme (CWP). 'Implementation Appraisals' aim to provide a succinct overview of material publicly available on the implementation, application and effectiveness of an EU law to date - drawing on available in-puts from, inter alia, the EU institutions and advisory committees, national parliaments, and relevant external consultation and outreach exercises. They are provided to assist parliamentary committees in their consideration of the new Commission proposal, once tabled. PE 536.328 v02-00