Redress and Alternative Dispute Resolution in Cross-Border e-commerce Transactions

15-01-2007

Executive summary Effective dispute settlement is regarded as one of the means of enhancing consumer confidence in cross-border purchases over the Internet. Yet a recent Eurobarometer survey1 shows that 41% of people who launched a formal complaint concerning cross-border purchases were not satisfied with the way their complaint was handled. Rather than going to the courts or elsewhere for settlement, most dissatisfied consumers took no further action, and only 6% brought the matter to an arbitration/mediation/conciliation body. Other studies of online dispute resolution (ODR) also show, on the whole, poor uptake by the public. Uptake of the EC’s own publicly funded ODR provider, ECODIR, has been described as “disappointing”2. Why do so few people resort to this kind of dispute settlement, and what are the implications of low uptake for consumer confidence in cross border ecommerce ? [...]

Executive summary Effective dispute settlement is regarded as one of the means of enhancing consumer confidence in cross-border purchases over the Internet. Yet a recent Eurobarometer survey1 shows that 41% of people who launched a formal complaint concerning cross-border purchases were not satisfied with the way their complaint was handled. Rather than going to the courts or elsewhere for settlement, most dissatisfied consumers took no further action, and only 6% brought the matter to an arbitration/mediation/conciliation body. Other studies of online dispute resolution (ODR) also show, on the whole, poor uptake by the public. Uptake of the EC’s own publicly funded ODR provider, ECODIR, has been described as “disappointing”2. Why do so few people resort to this kind of dispute settlement, and what are the implications of low uptake for consumer confidence in cross border ecommerce ? [...]

Išorės autorius

Lilian Edwards (University of Southhampton, UK) and Caroline Wilson (University of Southampton, UK)