The Law Enforcement Challenges of Cybercrime: Are We Really Playing Catch-Up?

28-10-2015

This study was commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the LIBE Committee. With a number of high-profile criminal cases, such as ‘Silk Road’, cybercrime has been very much in the spotlight in recent years, both in Europe and elsewhere. While this study shows that cybercrime poses significant challenges for law enforcement, it also argues that the key cybercrime concern for law enforcement is legal rather than technical and technological. The study further underlines that the European Parliament is largely excluded from policy development in the field of cybercrime, impeding public scrutiny and accountability.

This study was commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the LIBE Committee. With a number of high-profile criminal cases, such as ‘Silk Road’, cybercrime has been very much in the spotlight in recent years, both in Europe and elsewhere. While this study shows that cybercrime poses significant challenges for law enforcement, it also argues that the key cybercrime concern for law enforcement is legal rather than technical and technological. The study further underlines that the European Parliament is largely excluded from policy development in the field of cybercrime, impeding public scrutiny and accountability.

Išorės autorius

Ben Hayes (Transnational Institute - TNI) ; Julien Jeandesboz (University of Amsterdam - UvA) and Centre d’Études sur les Conflits, Liberté et Sécurité - CCLS) ; Francesco Ragazzi (Leiden University, Netherlands and Centre d’Études sur les Conflits, Liberté et Sécurité - CCLS) ; Stephanie Simon (University of Amsterdam - UvA) ; Valsamis Mitsilegas (Queen Mary University of London, the UK) ; This study was coordinated by the Centre d’Études sur les Conflits, Liberté et Sécurité (CCLS) and the Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS) and conducted under the scientific supervision of Didier Bigo (CCLS and Sciences Po Paris and King’s College London) and Amandine Scherrer (European Studies Coordinator and Associate Researcher at CCLS)